WXXI AM News

University of Rochester

Texas recently brought 100 top-level researchers to the state to search for cancer treatments. How did Texas poach talent from other places? A new state priority on research funding. And now an association of New York medical schools is asking our state to do the same.

Is this how we cure certain cancers, or triumph over diseases? It's possible: the schools argue that it's also how we create jobs and prevent other states from stealing our talented men and women. So how much should taxpayers contribute, and how does the process work? Our guests:

SASHA-ANN SIMONS

ROCHESTER (AP) The University of Rochester is getting $766,000 in federal research grants.

Rep. Louise Slaughter says the school is getting $450,000 for immunology research from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

A second $316,000 grant will help the study of how children learn to perform basic and complex math. That grant comes from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

This year's Skalny Concert at the University of Rochester is titled Masterpieces of Chamber Music.

The concert is co-sponsored by the Skalny Center for Polish and Central European Studies and the University of Rochester Department of Music.

The University of Rochester is working with the Rochester City School District to dramatically change the results at East High. Will it work? How exactly is it playing out? And can this model travel to other city schools? We welcomed a panel to discuss it. Our guests:

  • Shaun Nelms, Ed.D., superintendent of East EPO 
  • Stephen Uebbing, Ed.D., project director of East EPO and University of Rochester professor who was the chief force behind the design of the EPO proposal
  • Eddie Blanding, LMSW, social worker at East 
  • Catherine Wilson, East staff member and parent of an East student
  • Melissa Caso, student at East Upper School 
  • Sam Sheldon, student at East Lower School

The Immovable, But Beautiful, Hopeman Carillon

Aug 7, 2015
Adam Fenster / University of Rochester

There are many artistic and musical treasures in Rochester – one of the heaviest is the Hopeman Memorial Carillon in the tower of the Rush Rhees Library at the University of Rochester. 

A carillon is a collection of at least 23 bells arranged and tuned so they can be sounded together harmoniously. The Hopeman Carillon is made up of 50 bells. All together, the bells weigh more than six-thousand pounds.

We're getting up-to-speed on stem cell research. The debate was raging a decade ago: embryonic vs. adult stem cells. Many local scientists pushed for more opportunity to gain access to embryonic stem cells, given the potential to attack disease. How is research progressing? What's next? Mark Noble, professor of genetics, neurology, and anatomy at URMC will deliver a presentation later this month at the Rochester Academy of Medicine titled, "My Child Does Not Have Time for Your Ethics!". He joins us in studio along with Richard Dees, ethicist at the University of Rochester.

Representatives from University of Rochester are responding to racist, threatening posts on Yik Yak by asking the app to hand over the names of the posters.

Yik Yak is an anonymous posting app. Anyone can download it to their smartphone, share 200 character open messages, and view posts within a ten mile radius. For a bunch of reasons, Yik Yak has really found its niche on college campuses. Students often post about parties, professors, or other people, and sometimes it gets obscene and dark.

Student leaders from local universities gathered with Senator Gillibrand at University of Rochester to discuss campus sexual violence legislation. The senator says the Campus Accountability and Safety Act would provide incentive for universities to address sex crimes on campus. She says it would also increase transparency, and strengthen support for survivors.

Student leaders and administrators at the University of Rochester have created a new video designed to raise awareness about sexual assault on campus.

Jiebo Luo / University of Rochester

New software could help you track your mental health using your smartphone.

Researchers at the University of Rochester are finding ways to use video and front-facing cameras to monitor tiny facial cues that may indicate a person's current mood or mental health.

Jiebo Luo is a professor of Computer Science. He heads up a team that developed software designed to pick up on these little facial cues.

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