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Trump Designating North Korea As A State Sponsor Of Terrorism

Updated at 4:12 p.m. ET The Trump administration is putting North Korea back on the State Department's list of state sponsors of terrorism . President Trump says the move "supports our maximum pressure campaign to isolate this murderous regime." President Trump told reporters on Monday that the Treasury Department will officially announce additional sanctions and penalties on the North Korean regime on Tuesday. President Trump says this should have happened years ago. In fact, North Korea was...

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The University of Rochester Medical Center is embarking on $2.4 million study focused on a population that is virtually immune to food allergies: Old Order Mennonites.

Fewer than 1% of Old Order Mennonites have food allergies, asthma or other allergic diseases.

Kirsi Jarvinen-Seppo is leading the study,  an associate professor at UR. She said a difference in lifestyle could be affecting immune systems. Old Order Mennonites live on farms and deliver babies at home, while people who live in cities do just the opposite.

New research shows that the average life expectancy of homeless men and women in Rochester is more than two decades shorter than that of men and women who are not homeless. There's also a significant difference in the life expectancy of homeless men versus homeless women.

Harry Murray is the Nazareth College professor who did the research using data from the House of Mercy. He published his findings in a new report called "Homelessness as Death Sentence." We discuss the data and we'll talk about ways to help homeless people in our community. In studio:

  • Harry Murray, professor of sociology at Nazareth College
  • Sister Grace Miller, founder of the House of Mercy

As more women across the country feel empowered to share their experiences of being sexual harassed or sexually assaulted -- often in the workplace -- some people are asking the question, "What could detail the #MeToo movement?" A piece in the Daily Beast addresses that and offers a warning. We discuss it with our guests:

  • Vanessa Cheeks, reporter for Open Mic Roc
  • Erin-Kate Howard, co-founder of Lady Parts Theatre Company
  • Kelsey Claire Hagen, comedian

Empire State Manufacturing

A local maker of precision sheet metal products is expanding.

According to Empire State Development, TruForm Manufacturing, located on North Clinton Avenue in Rochester, recently installed new production equipment to service its medical customers.

Officials say TruForm has already hired 21 new employees due to the expansion, and they say another 40 jobs at the company have been retained.

To help with the expansion, New York State offered up to $350,000 through the Excelsior Jobs Program in exchange for job commitments. The total cost of the project was $500,000.

Beth Adams/WXXI News

Rochester is serving as a temporary home for hundreds of residents of Puerto Rico recently.

With electricity and water in short supply following Hurricane Maria, they are seeking refuge, at least for a while.

For Lorenzo Sanchez, it was a very specific need that brought him here. The 20-year old college student is a fencer for the Puerto Rican Fencing Federation.  He is training and for now, living with Iris Zimmerman, a former Olympian and co-owner of the Rochester Fencing Club.

The Keystone XL pipeline, an $8 billion project that has attracted significant protest from environmental groups, has cleared a major regulatory hurdle on its path to completion. On Monday, the Nebraska Public Service Commission certified the pipeline to run through the state.

Caitlin Whyte / WXXI News

A Rochester tradition continues this year at Holy Childhood and their new Special Touch Bakery.

Over 2,400 pies are being baked for the Thanksgiving holiday at Special Touch this week. The facility’s primary mission is to provide training and employment for people in our community with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

With pies stacked taller than my head, Director of Bakery Operations Joe Perdicho showed me around the bakery floor, which has been open for about a month now. He says there has been a lot of positive energy coming from the community.

Updated at 4:12 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is putting North Korea back on the State Department's list of state sponsors of terrorism. President Trump says the move "supports our maximum pressure campaign to isolate this murderous regime."

President Trump told reporters on Monday that the Treasury Department will officially announce additional sanctions and penalties on the North Korean regime on Tuesday.

First hour: What could derail the #MeToo movement?

Second hour: Homelessness as a death sentence

Town of Pittsford

Some changes will be hitting the Erie Canal in Brighton and Pittsford soon.

In order to maintain erosion and embankment security,  Executive Deputy Director at the State Canal Corporation John Callaghan says trees and brush along the canal must be removed.

"Large vegetation such as trees can have extensive root structures which could weaken the embankment, increasing a risk of failure."

Callaghan says there is no imminent risk to properties along the canal, but embankments need to be maintained to avoid possible flooding.

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The Department of Justice is suing to block AT&T's purchase of Time Warner, legally challenging a $85 billion deal that would give the telecom giant control of a media empire including CNN, DirecTV, Warner Brothers, HBO, and other major media brands.

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen today announced that she will resign from the Federal Reserve Board once her successor, Jerome Powell, is sworn in.

Yellen is the first woman to serve as Fed chair. While her term as Fed chair ends in February, Yellen could have stayed on the board until 2024, serving out her 14-year term as a Fed governor. Instead she'll follow the practice of previous Fed leaders and leave the board once Powell becomes chairman.

After Hurricane Harvey, some Texas residents, politicians and scientists are wondering whether the whole U.S. system for predicting floods is any good.

The storm's deluge flooded parts of southeast Texas that had rarely, or never, been underwater before. Some areas got more than 50 inches of rain in a few days. "When the numbers started coming in it was a little scary," says Matt Zeve, the director of operations for the Harris County Flood Control District, which includes Houston.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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From the Inclusion Desk

Caitlin Whyte / WXXI News

A Rochester tradition continues this year at Holy Childhood and their new Special Touch Bakery.

Over 2,400 pies are being baked for the Thanksgiving holiday at Special Touch this week. The facility’s primary mission is to provide training and employment for people in our community with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

With pies stacked taller than my head, Director of Bakery Operations Joe Perdicho showed me around the bakery floor, which has been open for about a month now. He says there has been a lot of positive energy coming from the community.

We discuss a difficult, often grim, but vital issue this hour: when people with disabilities are murdered by their caregivers or family members. According to the Autistic Self Advocacy Network, more than 400 people with a disability were murdered by a family member or caregiver in the last five years. In court, perpetrators often receive lighter sentences, and when these crimes are covered in the media, they are frequently described as "mercy killings."

Disability rights advocates are calling for change. They say when the justice system and the media handle murders of this nature in these ways, they dehumanize victims. We discuss the impact on the disability community with our guests:

Caitlin Whyte / WXXI News

  

The benefits of music on individuals with autism are widely known. Improved focus, advances in speech and language, and better motor skills. But sometimes it’s about the growth that you can’t quantify in numbers.

On a Tuesday night in a sleepy plaza in Penfield, the Music Education Center is buzzing. Kids are in the waiting room, parents are catching up and students are practicing anything from trombone to piano.

Noah Svokos is a curly haired 13 year old who has been taking piano lessons for 5 years at the center.

NPR.org

NPR's 2016 Tiny Desk Contest Winner Gaelynn Lea is in Rochester this weekend for a performance at Nazareth College Saturday.

She never thought she would be a performer full time. Which is a funny thought to come from someone who in the last year had 200 shows in 39 states and 6 different countries.

Born with Brittle Bone Disease, Lea is a violin player but also uses the platform she’s been given to talk about disability rights.

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

Rochester: Hub For Photonics

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