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Rep. Slaughter will join House Democrats who will skip the inauguration

(WXXI News and AP) Add local Congresswoman Louise Slaughter to the list of Democrats not attending Friday’s presidential inauguration of Republican Donald Trump. The Fairport Democrat issued a statement Tuesday, saying that, “ I take the privilege of serving as a member of Congress seriously, so this was not an easy decision. Congressman John Lewis and I came to Congress at the same time, and he has become like a brother to me. He came to Rochester late last year and visited the convent where...

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WXXI ARTS INFOCUS

Music has a way of touching every one of us. Some of us may have a deep appreciation for the artistry in making music, others may appreciate its ability to convey emotion and transport us to a different place.

But, as shown at the Hochstein School of Music and Dance, music can also be used as a form of therapy. Expressive Arts sessions improve the quality of life for people who are well, and meets the needs of children and adults with disabilities, disorders, illnesses, or learning differences. 

In one of his last moves in office, President Obama has commuted the 35-year prison sentence of Chelsea Manning, the Army private who leaked a massive trove of military secrets to WikiLeaks.

The former intelligence analyst's prison sentence has been shortened to expire on May 17, 2017, according to a statement from the White House.

TWC News

The Pittsford man whose confrontation with an autistic high school athlete from Syracuse has been sentenced to probation.

After pleading guilty last year to second degree harassment, which is a violation, and a charge of endangering the welfare of a child, which is a misdemeanor, 57 year old Martin MacDonald was sentenced Tuesday to three years of probation and 80 hours of community service for reportedly shoving 15 year old Chase Coleman to the ground at Cobbs Hill Park last October.

Coleman was running in a race when he went off course in the area of the city park.

louise.house.gov

(WXXI News and AP) Add local Congresswoman Louise Slaughter to the list of Democrats not attending Friday’s presidential inauguration of Republican Donald Trump.

Some state lawmakers are rejecting Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s budget proposal to extend a tax on millionaires.

The spending plan was outlined to some lawmakers at a lunch at the governor’s mansion, but won’t be available to the public until later this evening.

Senate Republican Majority Leader John Flanagan said he’s against a plan by Cuomo to once again extend the tax.

“I like cutting taxes,” Flanagan said.

Did BuzzFeed make a mistake by publishing the entire dossier of unverified links between Donald Trump and Russia? Editor-in-chief Ben Smith says no; he errs on the side of sunlight, and he views BuzzFeed as part of a new kind of media paradigm. But traditional journalists have said it was a reckless decision, a mistake.

Our panel debates the decision, and the future of disseminating information. In studio:

  • Tianna Manon, editor-in-chief of Open Mic Rochester
  • David Riley, former government reporter for the Democrat & Chronicle
  • Jack Rosenberry, journalism professor at St. John Fisher College
  • Jim Memmott, journalist with the Democrat & Chronicle and professor at the University of Rochester

Human trafficking is real, and it's here in Rochester. How can we spot red flags and potential victims? Our panel discusses misconceptions and realities regarding human trafficking. How does it start? Who is targeted?

We also preview local events -- including the "Human Trafficking: A Rochester Problem Too" conference at RIT -- and discuss an acclaimed novel called Little Peach. The author, Peggy Kern, will be part of a panel discussion in Rochester that will include representatives from Hillside Family of Agencies, Bivona Child Advocacy Center, and the Center for Youth. Our guests:

  • Jennifer Wolfley, human trafficking victim, founder and director of outreach services for the Paperbag Ladies, and criminal justice professor at RIT
  • Celia McIntosh, chair of the Rochester Regional Coalition Against Human Trafficking (RRCAHT)
  • Tanya Conley, supervising attorney at Legal Aid Attorney for the Child Program
  • Mary Whittier, founding executive director of Bivona Child Advocacy Center
  • Peggy Kern, author of the young adult novel, Little Peach

A professor at RIT has won funding from the National Science Foundation to develop an inclusive approach to physics graduate education as well as retaining traditionally underrepresented U.S. citizens.

Associate Professor Casey Miller is working with a $428,000 grant to increase diversity and physics Ph.D. completion rates among women, African Americans, Hispanic Americans and Native Americans.

Miller says the future needs  of the U.S. technological workforce depend on cultivating the talent pool and underrepresented groups.

Changing the face of public housing

4 hours ago
rochesterhousing.org

The Rochester Housing Authority wants to change the face of public housing.

RHA officials cut the ribbon today on a new building on Garson Avenue that houses four units.

Executive Director for RHA, John Hill, says they remodeled the entire interior and also made improvements to the exterior to make this public housing property look like any other attractive home in the neighborhood.

He says that's one way to improve the quality of life for residents who live there.

When an estimated hundreds of thousands of people pack the National Mall in Washington Friday morning, a Gates woman will be among them.

This will be Roberta Favitta's first presidential inauguration, and she admits to being a bit nervous about the large crowds.

"You'll never know what to expect with things that have happened in Paris and all over the world, and Isis, and all that stuff,” she said. “I heard three quarters of a million people will be there, so yeah, it's a little bit frightening."

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News from NPR

A partial repeal of Obamacare could leave 18 million people who have insurance today with no coverage one year later, according to an analysis by the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office.

The report estimates that 32 million people would lose their insurance over 10 years.

Kenya is gearing up for what will no doubt be a contentious presidential election this August.

There's the heroic, lightning-quick medical care that saves us from crises. And then there's the slow-but-steady incremental medical attention that doctors provide for weeks, months, years, even decades in the attempt to heal complex conditions.

In one of his last moves in office, President Obama has commuted the 35-year prison sentence of Chelsea Manning, the Army private who leaked a massive trove of military secrets to WikiLeaks.

The former intelligence analyst's prison sentence has been shortened to expire on May 17, 2017, according to a statement from the White House.

More news from NPR

From the Inclusion Desk

WXXI ARTS INFOCUS

Music has a way of touching every one of us. Some of us may have a deep appreciation for the artistry in making music, others may appreciate its ability to convey emotion and transport us to a different place.

But, as shown at the Hochstein School of Music and Dance, music can also be used as a form of therapy. Expressive Arts sessions improve the quality of life for people who are well, and meets the needs of children and adults with disabilities, disorders, illnesses, or learning differences. 

Courtesy Aimee Levesque

At the Golden Globe Awards this year, Meryl Streep received an honorary award for outstanding contributions to the world of entertainment.

In her acceptance speech, she criticized President-elect Trump for mocking a reporter with a disability. Trump, who denies that, dismissed Streep’s comments on Twitter.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is due to release his budget on Tuesday, and agencies that work with those with intellectual disabilities are among those hoping for more funds. They say they need help to pay workers the new higher minimum wage.

New York’s minimum wage is going up over the next few years, to $15 eventually in New York City and lesser amounts upstate. Groups that provide services for the developmentally disabled rely on Medicaid reimbursements to pay their workers, and they say they’ll have a hard time meeting the higher wages without more money from the state.

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

Rochester: Hub For Photonics

What is photonics and why is it coming to Rochester?

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