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Livingston County Health Dept.

Local support for $2 billion investment in New York's water

Advocates for the environment are pleased the latest state budget contains a 2 and a half billion dollar investment in drinking water infrastructure and water quality protection. But more could be done to protect source water. That's according to Dr. Lisa Cleckner, director of the Finger Lakes Institute at Hobart and William Smith Colleges. FLI provides research and education about the Finger Lakes environment. She says funding for water protection programs has been on the decline. "We're...

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Secretary of State Rex Tillerson says the Trump administration is open to direct talks with North Korea as long as the agenda is right — that is, denuclearizing the Korean Peninsula.

As he prepared to chair a U.N. Security Council meeting on the subject, Tillerson sat down with NPR's Steve Inskeep to explain his approach. The secretary says North Korea has to come to the table willing to talk about giving up its nuclear weapons.

It’s been said that history has a way of repeating itself. The global refugee crisis of more than 65 million displaced people draws a correlation to one of the darkest times in human history. Today the world is experiencing the worst humanitarian crisis since World War II.

As some nations open their borders to refugees escaping conflicts in their homelands, closer to home we remember our past when nearly a thousand refugees from Europe arrived in Oswego, New York in 1944.

First hour: Investigative journalist David Cay Johnston

Second hour: Songwriters Bat McGrath and Connie Deming

A bill that could address corruption in Albany is progressing in the state Legislature, but it might not be the measure that Gov. Andrew Cuomo wants to become law.

Several former Cuomo associates, including a former top aide, face federal corruption trials on charges of bribery and bid-rigging in connection with the contracts for some of the governor’s signature economic development projects, including the Buffalo Billion.

High Tech Rochester has announced the winners of this year’s Rochester Venture Challenge.

The top prize went to Empire Medicinals, a Rochester healthcare startup,  which looks to modernize traditional herbal medicines.

As the 1st place winner, Empire Medicinals receives a grand prize of $25,000 and one year of incubation services at High Tech Rochester.

2nd place went to Therm Apparel, and the 3rd place winner was Primary Book Club.

An old army base about 70 miles from Rochester was the only site in the United States to welcome refugees from Europe during the Holocaust. Fort Ontario in Oswego, an internment camp, became home to 982 refugees in 1944, but many people don't know its story or the history and politics behind the refugees' arrival. Now, Fort Ontario is back in the news: there's proposed legislation to make the site a national park. 

In 1987, WXXI produced a documentary about the camp. It's called Safe Haven. We honor the film's 30th anniversary and the lives of Holocaust victims and survivors by sharing their stories. Our guests:

  • Paul Lewis, writer, director, and producer of Safe Haven
  • Irving Schild, Holocaust survivor who lived at Fort Ontario
  • Warren Heilbronner, Holocaust survivor

The Rochester area has made a top-20 list of organizations being recognized for their support of the arts.

The list is put out by the National Center for Arts Research, part of Southern Methodist University, and it publishes what it calls an annual Arts Vibrancy Index.

The Rochester metro area ranks number 19 on the list of the top 20 most ‘arts vibrant’ large communities (population over 1 million). The total survey  ranks more than 900 communities.

Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren delivered her third State of the City address Monday night. In it, she outlined a list of accomplishments from the last year, including that her administration "created or retained more than 30,000 jobs across the entire city." That figure -- among other statements Warren made about her successes -- has been challenged by her opponents. 

We sit down with Deputy Mayor Cedric Alexander to discuss the address, the administration's goals for the future, and we ask our questions and yours.

Updated at 3:45 p.m. ET

United Airlines and lawyers for the passenger seen on video being dragged from a United airliner in Chicago say the man has reached "an amicable settlement" with the airline. The terms of the agreement were not announced.

Livingston County Health Dept.

Advocates for the environment are pleased the latest state budget contains a 2 and a half billion dollar investment in drinking water infrastructure and water quality protection.

But more could be done to protect source water.

That's according to Dr. Lisa Cleckner, director of the Finger Lakes Institute at Hobart and William Smith Colleges.

FLI provides research and education about the Finger Lakes environment.

She says funding for water protection programs has been on the decline.

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News from NPR

When President Donald Trump selected retired Marine Gen. James Mattis for defense secretary, it was a rare choice. No recently retired general had been selected for the top Pentagon job since George Marshall, some 66 years earlier.

Here is a proposition that may seem self-evident to many people: As societies become more modern, religion loses its grip. Superstition inevitably gives way to rationality. A belief in magic is replaced by a belief in science.

Sociologists call it the "secularization thesis." In 1822, Thomas Jefferson suggested an early version of it, predicting that Unitarianism "will, ere long, be the religion of the majority from north to south."

Friday, for the first time since 1983, a sitting president will address the National Rifle Association at the group's annual convention — when President Trump, along with a who's who of gun rights advocates, is scheduled to talk at the NRA Leadership Forum in Atlanta, Ga.

Gerald Chinchar, a Navy veteran who loves TV Westerns, isn't quite at the end of his life, but the end is probably not far away. The 77-year-old's medications fill a dresser drawer, and congestive heart failure puts him at high risk of emergency room visits and long hospital stays. He fell twice last year, shattering his hip and femur, and now gets around his San Diego home in a wheelchair.

Above all, Chinchar hopes to avoid another long stint in the hospital. He still likes to go watch his grandchildren's sporting events and play blackjack at the casino.

More news from NPR

From the Inclusion Desk

tippingpointmedia.com

The Arc of Monroe County held an annual event that celebrates people with developmental disabilities and their willingness and ability to get jobs within the community.

Around 100 business leaders and hiring managers attended the event, which is designed to cultivate a diverse workforce.

The Arc of Monroe's Job Path program is the region's oldest and largest training and placement service for individuals with disabilities, according to Arc CEO Barbara Wale.

Rochester is home to the nation's largest deaf population per capita, and throughout the years, the city has been praised for its efforts to promote accessibility and inclusivity among the deaf community. Kodak and Xerox provided jobs for deaf people, local hospitals led the way in staffing interpreters, and this year, NTID is teaming up with the University of Rochester to offer training and resources for deaf scientists. In 2006, the New York Times said, “It is here that the world of the deaf intersects the world of the hearing as in no other city.”

Despite all of this, there are still misconceptions among the hearing community that impede further progress. This hour, we talk to members of the Deaf community about Deaf culture, the challenges they face, and what they hope to see for a more inclusive future. Our guests:

  • Matthew S. Moore, president of MSM Productions, Ltd, author of For Hearing People Only, and publisher of Deaf Life Magazine
  • Matthew J. Schwartz, ASL teacher at Rush Henrietta High School, ASL coach, and performer
  • Darcy O'Dell, interpreter
  • Anthony Bizzarro, interpreter

This conversation is part of WXXI’s Inclusion Desk, spotlighting issues related to disabilities. The WXXI Inclusion Desk is part of Move to Include — a partnership to encourage thoughtful discussion about issues of inclusion and the differently-abled. You can watch this conversation, with captions, on City 12 or at:

Karen Shakerdge/WXXI

One disability rights activist says that often people are too quick to assume someone with a disability can’t make their own decisions. Emily Ladau, a writer and editor in chief of the Rooted in Rights blog, visited Rochester recently to raise awareness about a different way of thinking called self-direction.

rochesteraccessibleadventures.org

An organization in Rochester is working to establish real time access to recreation and sports for people with disabilities.

Rochester Accessible Adventures is about a year old, and Executive Director Anita O’Brien says their mission is to train recreational businesses to offer their services to everyone.

"I love the idea of adventure and that each person is able to choose what that means to them in life. Particularly in RAA it really is focused on recreation, active healthy lifestyle opportunities."

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

Rochester: Hub For Photonics

What is photonics and why is it coming to Rochester?

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