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In Inaugural Address, Trump Decries 'Carnage' And Promises 'America First'

A newly inaugurated Donald J. Trump delivered a fiercely populist and often dark address, promising to transfer power in Washington from political elites to the people and vowing to put "America first." Surrounded by members of Congress and the Supreme Court, the nation's 45th president repeated themes from his historic and divisive campaign message, describing children in poverty, schools in crisis and streets pocked with crime and "carnage." "For too long, a small group in our nation's...

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Sasha-Ann Simons / WXXI News

The inauguration of President Donald Trump was the topic of conversation Friday at a lot of places around Rochester where people usually gather, and barbershops traditionally are  a place to share thoughts and comments.

At Changing Faces Barbershop in Irondequoit, one of the barbers, Kelvin Young, who was among those watching the ceremonies on the TV in the shop, said he hopes President Trump can deliver what he promised as a candidate.

Weekend Connections is a collection of some of the most noteworthy moments from the week on Connections with Evan Dawson. This episode includes conversations about:

  • A local professor's trip to Iraqi Kurdistan and how she views oil as a human rights issue;
  • The dangers and realities of human trafficking;
  • SNAP and food options for people living in poverty;
  • The value of art.

One of the chief arguments over the state budget will be whether to renew an income tax surcharge on New York’s wealthiest.

The state is facing a $3.5 billion deficit, and Gov. Andrew Cuomo wants to add a billion dollars to the state’s public schools. He also wants to offer free tuition at public colleges for families making less than $125,000 a year.

Cuomo said continuing the tax surcharge — known as the millionaires’ tax — is the simplest way to finance all that.

“Frankly we don’t have the resources to lose the millionaires’ revenue now,” Cuomo said.

NPR

NPR Politics is listening to President-elect Donald Trump’s inaugural address and fact checking it below.

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A newly inaugurated Donald J. Trump delivered a fiercely populist and often dark address, promising to transfer power in Washington from political elites to the people and vowing to put "America first."

Surrounded by members of Congress and the Supreme Court, the nation's 45th president repeated themes from his historic and divisive campaign message, describing children in poverty, schools in crisis and streets pocked with crime and "carnage."

NPR

Watch today’s inauguration celebration from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. with coverage from PBS NewsHour.

Many central New Yorkers are gathering in Washington D.C. today for the inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump. Some are eagerly awaiting the speech from the infamously unpredictable Trump. Others are there to protest.

Nearly as many people are expected in the nation’s capital to protest Donald Trump as there are to attend his inauguration. Among the 250,000 people who received a ticket to the event is a World War II veteran from Western New York who is proud to have defended the rights of protestors, but upset by politicians choosing not to attend.


NPR

Keep tabs on everything happening this Inauguration day through our live blog from NPR News and NPR Politics.

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NYS Dept of Ag & Markets

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York state is making $2 million available to local governments and non-profit groups to help in the fight against invasive species.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo's administration announced the funding on Thursday. The grants will support projects which seek to detect, monitor and stop the spread of non-native plants and animals.

Cuomo, a Democrat, says the funding is vital to helping the state control and remove invasive species and prevent them from doing damage to the local environment.

The grants range in size from $11,000 to $100,000.

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News from NPR

Alongside the oath of office at the Capitol on Friday, a much quieter part of the presidential handover took place, as the federal government's websites changed hands.

When the transition from President Obama to President Trump happened officially at noon ET, a lot changed, including the White House website.

Waiting on the new website were six priority areas laid out, including on foreign policy. The entire foreign policy section is literally just 220 words, so it's hard to draw more than a thumbnail sketch about Trump's foreign policy. But it gives the first hint of something of a Trump doctrine.

The Asian Football Confederation says it found out that a dozen Brazilian-born soccer players playing for East Timor were registered using phony birth or baptism certificates.

Now, it has booted the East Timor team out of the 2023 Asian Cup. The players involved in the scheme played in 29 matches, which included World Cup qualifying games.

All Things Considered co-host Ari Shapiro is on a road trip leading up to the inauguration of Donald Trump on Jan. 20. He is driving through North Carolina and Virginia, on the way to Washington, D.C. These are two swing states that went in opposite directions in November, each by a close margin: North Carolina for Trump, Virginia for Hillary Clinton. As the country faces dramatic changes, we're asking people what they want from that change — and what concerns them.

More news from NPR

From the Inclusion Desk

WXXI ARTS INFOCUS

Music has a way of touching every one of us. Some of us may have a deep appreciation for the artistry in making music, others may appreciate its ability to convey emotion and transport us to a different place.

But, as shown at the Hochstein School of Music and Dance, music can also be used as a form of therapy. Expressive Arts sessions improve the quality of life for people who are well, and meets the needs of children and adults with disabilities, disorders, illnesses, or learning differences. 

Courtesy Aimee Levesque

At the Golden Globe Awards this year, Meryl Streep received an honorary award for outstanding contributions to the world of entertainment.

In her acceptance speech, she criticized President-elect Trump for mocking a reporter with a disability. Trump, who denies that, dismissed Streep’s comments on Twitter.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is due to release his budget on Tuesday, and agencies that work with those with intellectual disabilities are among those hoping for more funds. They say they need help to pay workers the new higher minimum wage.

New York’s minimum wage is going up over the next few years, to $15 eventually in New York City and lesser amounts upstate. Groups that provide services for the developmentally disabled rely on Medicaid reimbursements to pay their workers, and they say they’ll have a hard time meeting the higher wages without more money from the state.

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

Rochester: Hub For Photonics

What is photonics and why is it coming to Rochester?

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