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Iconic Rochester artist Wendell Castle has died

An iconic figure in the art world, both in Rochester and around the world has died. Wendell Castle died in his Scottsville home on Saturday. That word came Sunday morning from RIT, where Castle was an artist in residence. He was 85 years old. Wendell Castle was an artist for more than 60 years and is considered a founder of the American Crafts and Art Furniture movements. More than 100 of his works are installed in museums worldwide, and up until recently, was still innovating in his studio...

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Imagine if the flu was about as common as diphtheria, measles, or other relatively rare viruses.

Researchers say if a universal vaccine being tested right now does what they hope it will, people would be able to get a flu shot once every five or ten years and be protected against any form of influenza.

As health officials report one of the most severe flu seasons in recent years, Rochester Clinical Research is one of five sites around the U.S. enrolling subjects in trial studies for the vaccine.

Public trust in the media is at an all-time low. One reason - concern over ‘fake news’ is at a high. That’s according to a new survey released this week by Gallup and the Knight Foundation. Seventy-three percent of Americans say inaccurate information on the web is a “major problem” with news coverage. So how do we deal with this issue of ‘fake news’ and how do we improve public trust in the media? Mike Johansson (Senior Lecturer, RIT School of Communication), Deanna Dewberry (Anchor & Reporter, News10NBC), and Justin Murphy (Education Reporter, Democrat & Chronicle), in addition to Rochester area residents, share their perspectives on this edition of Need to Know

Updated at 8:30 a.m. ET.

The partial shutdown of the federal government has stretched into a third day, as discussions continue on a funding and immigration plan.

Lawmakers said Sunday they made progress on a potential agreement to end the shutdown, but did not reach a final deal. Senate leaders scheduled a procedural vote for noon on Monday on a bill to reopen the government and extend funding through Feb. 8.

www.nps.gov

NEW YORK (AP) — The Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island will be open for visitors Monday, with New York state picking up the tab for the federal workers.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo made the announcement Sunday afternoon.

The two sites have been closed due to the federal government shutdown.

The Democratic Cuomo says the sites are vital to the state's tourism industry, so the state will spend about $65,000 per day for the federal employees who operate the sites. He says the revenue gained more than offsets the costs.

Matt Ryan New York Now

On Monday the first of a series of federal corruption trials begins for several former associates of Governor Cuomo. The proceedings in the federal courthouse in lower Manhattan will focus on bribery and other charges against Governor Cuomo’s former closest aide, Joseph Percoco.

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A friend and colleague of Wendell Castle said the artist was tireless and always enthusiastic about his next venture.

WXXI News spoke with Professor and Chair of RITs Industrial Design program Josh Owen, who came to RIT about eight years ago, and had been working with Castle ever since.

"Always enthusiastic about innovation and about pushing materiality and technology. We brought countless students and faculty into his studio to witness his robot carving away at his new ideas that were otherwise impossible to realize in any other manner."

Kodak made news when the former photo giant announced it will launch its own Bitcoin-like currency later this month called “Kodak Coin.” Kodak joins the cryptocurrency craze at a time when all eyes are on the market leader, Bitcoin. The digital currency saw a surge in 2017 yet some investors and researchers question its viability long-term and whether the “Bitcoin bubble”  as some call it will soon pop. RIT’s Josephine Wolff (Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Computing Security) and Bitcoin NYS Founder Gary Palmer Jr., weigh in on this segment of Need to Know.

WXXI TV

An iconic figure in the art world, both in Rochester and around the world has died.

Wendell Castle died in his Scottsville home on Saturday. That word came Sunday morning from RIT, where Castle was an artist in residence. He was 85 years old.

Wendell Castle was an artist for more than 60 years and is considered a founder of the American Crafts and Art Furniture movements. More than 100  of his works are installed in museums worldwide, and up until recently, was still innovating in his studio in the Rochester area.

Updated at 10:01 p.m. ET

The Senate will vote at noon on Monday to end the government shutdown. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell took to the floor Sunday evening and laid out a plan to restore government funding for three weeks and consider immigration proposals, while bipartisan talks continue to end the impasse that has triggered a partial government shutdown since Friday night.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer objected to a vote on Sunday evening, but not the plan to vote on Monday.

Greg Cotterill / WXXI News

People participating in marches in the United States and around the world walked in support of female empowerment and denounced President Donald Trump's views on immigration, abortion, LGBT rights and women's rights on the anniversary of his inauguration.

That included the location often referred to as the birthplace of the women’s rights movement, Seneca Falls, where a large crowd marched Saturday by the Women’s Rights National Historical Park, and the National Women’s Hall of Fame, among other landmarks.

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Coverage of harassment claims against faculty at the University of Rochester

News from NPR

Vice President Mike Pence says the U.S. will complete the plan to move its embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem by the end of 2019, announcing a faster timeline for opening the embassy than had been previously reported. Pence announced the new deadline during his visit to Israel.

"In the weeks ahead, our administration will advance its plan to open the United States embassy in Jerusalem — and that United States embassy will open before the end of next year," Pence said.

It's said that time heals all wounds. But not for people afflicted with dementia like Gerda Noack. The 93-year-old German woman's memory is fading, as is her eyesight.

The losses scare her. On a recent morning at the AlexA Residence for Senior Citizens in Dresden where she lives, Noack sounded anxious as she asked, over and over: "Where am I supposed to go?"

The leader of Catalonia's parliament has nominated Carles Puigdemont to a new term as president, adding another twist in the story of the separatist leader who was ousted from power by Spain last year.

The move comes as Spain's Supreme Court rejects prosecutors' call to renew a European arrest warrant against Puigdemont. Prosecutors were calling for Puigdemont to be arrested in Denmark, where he traveled on Monday.

More news from NPR

From the Inclusion Desk

Classically trained violinist and songwriter Gaelynn Lea has been immersed in music since her childhood. While she says her primary focus in life is on her career as a musician, it was her rise to fame after winning the 2016 NPR Tiny Desk contest when she also took on a new role - that of a disability advocate and public speaker.  During a recent concert in Rochester at Nazareth College, Lea told Need to Know that the underrepresentation of people with disabilities in the arts has given her a new stage to share a powerful message.

We conclude our Dialogue on Disability Week with a conversation about "invisible" disabilities. Our guests share the challenges they face living with multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. In studio:

freeimages.com/Jos van Galen

Some 2,000 Rochester area residents with disabilities are in need of housing.

And that number only reflects individuals who get services through one state agency, the New York State Office of People With Developmental Disabilities.  The overall need for affordable, accessible housing is even greater.

This has always been an issue, but it's become a bigger problem in recent years, as more people are interested in living independently.

Our Dialogue on Disability Week continues with a conversation about adaptive sports. According to the CDC, nearly half of adults with disabilities ages 18 to 64 do not get aerobic physical activity. Local organizations are helping to change that by offering opportunities in adaptive sports.

We hear the stories of local athletes in those programs. Our guests:

  • Michael Cocquyt, supervisor of SportsNet
  • Jen Truscott, alpine skier
  • David Grace, sled hockey athlete, who participates in many winter sports

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

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