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Former assembly speaker: 'I pray I will not die in prison'

NEW YORK (AP) — Former New York Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver is begging for mercy ahead of his sentencing next week, telling a judge he prays he will not die in prison. The 74-year-old Democrat submitted a letter in Manhattan federal court late Friday, saying he and his wife "are both crumbling" since he was convicted in May during a retrial on corruption charges. Prosecutors, in their own submission Friday, sought a sentence of well over 10 years in prison. Silver was sentenced to 12...

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Caitlin Whyte / WXXI News

A first of its kind "pilgrimage" brought both Republican and Democratic leaders to Western New York this weekend to explore two significant freedom movements in the state, the abolitionist movement and women’s suffrage.

After a day in and around Seneca Falls, the lawmakers made their way to Rochester Sunday morning, to honor the late Congresswoman Louise Slaughter at Susan B. Anthony Square.

Republican Congressman Tom Reed of the Southern Tier and Democratic Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney of New York City hosted the weekend of events.

At a festival appearance in New York City's Central Park, Hillary Clinton spoke against President Trump's apparent reluctance to accept intelligence showing that Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential election.

"The great mystery is why the president has not spoken up for our country and we saw that most clearly in this recent meeting with Putin," she said.

Updated at 7:42 p.m. EST

"The good news is that your favorite President did nothing wrong!" President Trump tweeted Saturday morning. His message follows a New York Times report on Friday that his longtime lawyer, Michael Cohen, secretly recorded their discussion about payments to a former Playboy model who said she had a 10-month affair with Trump.

wnyc.org

NEW YORK (AP) — Former New York Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver is begging for mercy ahead of his sentencing next week, telling a judge he prays he will not die in prison.

The 74-year-old Democrat submitted a letter in Manhattan federal court late Friday, saying he and his wife "are both crumbling" since he was convicted in May during a retrial on corruption charges.

Prosecutors, in their own submission Friday, sought a sentence of well over 10 years in prison.

Spectrum News

Rochester fire officials have released a cause for the massive fire at a scrap yard on the west side of the city on Friday afternoon.

They say that an old fuel pump that had been crushed released vapors that ignited, sparking a fire that involved a rubbish pile of metal, with a number of stripped vehicles consumed in the flames.

The fire was at 80 Steel Street. It was reported just  before 4:30pm, and the billowing smoke was seen for miles.

B. Watts / Out Alliance

ROC Pride Week wraps up with two big events this weekend -- the annual Rochester Pride Parade and Pride Festival.

Out Alliance Communications Director Rowan Collins says they expect around 35,000 people to see the parade on Saturday this year, up from 30,000 last year.

"Our overarching theme for Pride this year has been "Stand Out: Live in Color." It really is about embracing authenticity.  Whoever you are at this moment is okay, and we want you to bring that person with you."

Sen. Gillibrand hosts town hall at MCC

Jul 20, 2018

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand took questions from some of her constituents in the Rochester area on Friday evening.

She made a stop at Monroe Community College for the first of several town hall meetings across the state. Dozens attended, and there were more questions than time allowed. Gillibrand took questions on topics ranging from healthcare to immigration.

A Rochester business owner has been accused of scheming to defraud the Rochester School Modernization Program and the Rochester Joint Schools Construction Board.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office on Friday announced that 53 year old Orville Dixon of Rochester faces a charge of wire fraud.

Dixon was president and owner of Journee Construction when he allegedly allowed contractors, who did not meet the requirements of a diversity plan to use his company as a pass-through agency, for a fee.

The tragic death of a city teen is causing a community to rethink how it assists families with autism. On this edition of Need to Know we learn about the work to bring support and crisis services to those in need.

Also on the show, it’s known as one of the least diverse professions in our nation. We’ll hear about efforts to diversify the local legal field.

And from a distance, her pieces look like landscape paintings. Up close, something else jumps out at you. Don’t miss the work of artist Victoria Connors.

www.rochesterpuertoricanparade.com

First hour: Local Puerto Ricans discuss cultural pride, politics, and more

Second hour: Exploring the intersection of art, technology, and social justice

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News from NPR

The Trump Administration released previously classified documents Saturday related to the FBI wiretapping of one-time campaign adviser Carter Page. Republicans say the documents reveal the FBI relied on an anti-Trump source for its decision, while Democrats say the warrants underscore murky and possibly criminal connections between the Russian government and the Trump campaign.

Just over four years ago, on July 17, 2014, six delegates on their way to the International AIDS Conference died in the shoot-down of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 over eastern Ukraine.

The delegates were among the 298 people killed hours after their flight took off from Amsterdam.

International investigations concluded that the missile that downed the jet originated with the Russian military, which has denied involvement.

All roads may lead to Rome, but once you get there, good luck taking the subway. The sprawling metropolis is expanding its mass transit system — a sluggish process made even slower as workers keep running into buried ancient ruins.

"I found some gold rings. I found glasswork laminated in gold depicting a Roman god, some amphoras," says Gilberto Pagani, a bulldozer operator at the Amba Aradam metro stop, currently under construction not far from the Colosseum.

The last time Matthew Caruana Galizia saw his mother alive, she was going to the bank.

A government minister had gotten the courts to freeze her bank accounts. She intended to fight for access to her funds.

"If someone tried to shut her up, if someone tried to stop her, she'd just fight back even harder," the son says. "That was her spirit."

Daphne Caruana Galizia was an investigative reporter, a towering, intense mother of three, digging up dirt on the most powerful figures in Malta, the European Union's smallest member state.

More news from NPR

From the Inclusion Desk

freeimages.com/Julia Freeman-Woolpert

Deaf individuals are up to seven times as likely as their hearing peers to have heart disease, high blood pressure, and strokes.

That's according to research from RIT's National Technical Institute for the Deaf and the University of Michigan.

Professor Peter Hauser, director of NTID's Center on Cognition and Language, recently reported to a UN committee in Geneva, Switzerland about the problem.

Hauser said, through an interpreter, these health disparities are the result of knowledge gaps in the deaf community.

Prime Care Coordination, described by its executive director Tracy Boff as “an umbrella organization” for groups that aid people with disabilities, has opened its regional hub in Webster.

“This is going to coordinate all of a person’s care including their medical care, behavioral health needs, social needs, their housing — all of their needs,” Boff said.

Prime Care, a Medicaid-funded company wholly owned by non-profit agencies, has replaced the Medicaid Service Coordination program, which until July 1 handled medical and social services for people with disabilities.

New York agency to protect disabled vows more transparency

Jul 5, 2018
New York State Justice Center for the Protection of People with Special Needs

ALBANY — New York's agency tasked with investigating accusations of abuse and neglect against disabled people in state care is promising to improve transparency following years of complaints about conducting nearly all of its work in secret.

Denise Miranda took over last year as executive director of the Justice Center for the Protection of People with Special Needs.

freeimages.com/Thomas Picard

The founder of Rochester's first film camp for deaf and hard of hearing youth is offering a workshop at Writers and Books this summer.

Speaking through an interpreter, Stacy Lawrence said she wants to share her passion for filmmaking with kids and help them understand what they are capable of.

"I want these children to realize that they are in the same company as wonderful deaf artists and deaf poets right here in Rochester, right under our noses."

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

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