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Wegmans

Colleen Wegman named CEO of Wegmans

There are some changes in the executive ranks at Wegmans. In what likely has been a succession plan for some time, on Wednesday, the Rochester-based grocer announced that Colleen Wegman has been named President and CEO of the chain, and her father, Danny Wegman will have the title of chairman. 45 year old Colleen Wegman has been with the company since 1991. She was named president in 2005 by the late Bob Wegman, who was her grandfather, and had been chairman of the company. That same year...

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The latest announcement from the AIM Photonics board about that initiative in Rochester involves the development of electronic sensors that  can be used  by the military and for various civilian applications.

Officials say the new Defense Department project will help researchers develop sensors that can be used for things like environmental monitoring, diagnosing disease, ensuring food safety and detecting chemical and biological weapons.

With lawmakers in Albany preoccupied with getting the budget done by week’s end, groups have to get creative to gain attention. Supporters of spending for public defense for the poor came up with one way: a “Wheel of Fortune”-style game staged right in the middle of the action.

The New York Civil Liberties Union chose a busy corridor in the Capitol between lawmakers’ offices and the Senate and Assembly chambers to hold a contest featuring a brightly colored wheel styled after the one on the iconic television show.

We talk with Joann Lublin, the management news editor for The Wall Street Journal.

While her work at The Journal has earned numerous accolades, including a Pulitzer Prize, Lublin's ascent to the newspaper’s highest ranks did not come without challenges. As one of the paper's first female reporters, she says she experienced sexual harassment, unequal pay, and a number of other obstacles. Lublin decided to share her experiences — along with those of more than 50 other high ranking female corporate executives — in a new book, Earning It: Hard-Won Lessons from Trailblazing Women at the Top of the Business World.

She joins us to discuss leadership lessons and her thoughts on the future of women in the workplace.

Paychex is reporting fiscal third quarter results that beat Wall Street estimates in terms of earnings per share.

The company earned $202 million for the quarter, up 12 percent from a year ago, or 56 cents per share. The analysts’ average estimate was 54 cents.

Revenues of more than $782 million were 6 percent higher than last year, but came in slightly less than analysts expected.

Paychex President & CEO Martin Mucci says that it was a solid quarter for the company.

How and where we build housing, streets, and stores can have major effects the health of our communities. That’s the focus of the next Reshaping Rochester event, which explores how to create equitable and healthy neighborhoods.

We discuss the rising popularity of Health Impact Assessments (HIAs), which analyze how public health can be impacted by proposed plans and policies. In San Francisco, for instance, developers building an affordable housing complex near an area with high traffic pollution changed their plans to construct windows on the traffic side of the building after seeing data from an HIA. The new plans led to windows facing a courtyard, with less noise and pollution, and more views of green space.

The solutions proposed by HIAs are pushing developers to think about construction and health in new ways. There are even a few HIAs in Rochester, including one exploring the city’s waterfront. We discuss all of this and more with our guests:

News coverage including the youth voice, gauging the youth perspective, and digging into issues affecting our youth are of importance to WXXI and to Need to Know. Part of that coverage also means finding and reaching out to young people, in this case high school seniors, who are not only working hard to make the grade in school, but also want to make our community and our world a better place. This edition of Need to Know is the launch of our new series “Top of the Class” which will introduce viewers to these amazing young people. Greece Athena High School senior, Chima Dimgba, is the first student to be recognized in the series.

Alex Crichton

A new facility will soon be open to serve children and families dealing with autism spectrum disorder.

The ribbon was cut today on UR Medicine's Neuromedicine and Behavioral Health Center on East River Road.

Dr. Nina Schor is Pediatrician-in-Chief at Golisano Children's Hospital.

She says the center will serve as an outpatient facility.

Wegmans

There are some changes in the executive ranks at Wegmans.

In what likely has been a succession plan for some time, on Wednesday, the Rochester-based grocer announced that Colleen Wegman has been named President and CEO of the chain, and her father, Danny Wegman will have the title of chairman.

45 year old Colleen Wegman has been with the company since 1991. She was named president in 2005 by the late Bob Wegman, who was her grandfather, and had been chairman of the company. That same year Danny Wegman was named CEO. 

Xerox Corporation

Xerox has announced what it says is the largest product launch in the 110 year history of the company.

The launch on Wednesday hosted by Xerox CEO Jeff  Jacobson and other company officials in New York City involves 29 printers and multi-function devices that look to take advantage of various software capabilities.

They revolve around ConnectKey, that is Xerox technology which helps the user move between various kinds of office equipment and documents.

Mayor Lovely Warren is seeking community input Wednesday evening about what to do with the vacant City-owned site at 151 Mt. Hope Ave.

The nearly two-acre site is located near the Genesee River, south of I-490 in the South Wedge neighborhood. 

"As we work to transform our city, creating safer more vibrant neighborhoods, more jobs and better educational opportunities for our children, we are here to listen to what residents and business owners have to say about opportunities in their neighborhood,” Warren said in  a news release.

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News from NPR

They come from places like Vietnam, China, Mexico and Guatemala, lured by promises of better-paying jobs and legal immigration. Instead, they're smuggled into the U.S., forced to work around the clock as bussers, wait staff and cooks, and housed in cramped living quarters. For this, they must pay exorbitant fees that become an insurmountable debt, even as their pay is often withheld, stolen or unfairly docked.

Two separate high-profile incidents broadcast this week highlighted the criticism black women regularly face in the workplace and spurred many to share their own experiences on social media.

For years, a State Department employee allegedly received tens of thousands of dollars in gifts from Chinese intelligence agents and failed to report the repeated contacts to U.S. officials.

Candace Claiborne pleaded not guilty at a federal court appearance Wednesday to charges of obstructing an official proceeding and making false statements to the FBI, over her relationship with the Chinese agents.

Cristiano Ronaldo is one of the world's most recognizable people.

An international soccer superstar, blessed with good looks and a golden foot, Ronaldo indisputably stands as one of the greatest to take the pitch. He's so beloved, in fact, that he just got an international airport named after him in his native Madeira Islands in Portugal — plus a bust fashioned in his likeness.

More news from NPR

From the Inclusion Desk

Alex Crichton

A new facility will soon be open to serve children and families dealing with autism spectrum disorder.

The ribbon was cut today on UR Medicine's Neuromedicine and Behavioral Health Center on East River Road.

Dr. Nina Schor is Pediatrician-in-Chief at Golisano Children's Hospital.

She says the center will serve as an outpatient facility.

Last week the Supreme Court unanimously ruled on a case that some say may change special education.

Advocates from the Center for Disability Rights and other organizations are calling on local Republican congressional members to preserve critical components of the Affordable Care Act that would affect disabled populations.

Damita Peace works with the Regional Center for Independent Living and said most importantly, they’re asking for the continued right that people with disabilities can live and receive necessary care in their homes, rather than institutions.

Sesame Street Workshop

Sesame Street is introducing a new Muppet to its cast, and she is unlike any Muppet they have had before.

Her name is Julia, and she has autism.

The character was introduced online in 2015, but will now become a regular on the television show.

Rachel Rosner, the director of education and support services at Rochester-based Autism Up, said introducing a character with autism is a huge step forward for the show — and for raising awareness.

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

Rochester: Hub For Photonics

What is photonics and why is it coming to Rochester?

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