WXXI AM News

Inclusion Desk

The Inclusion Desk is a multi-platform reporting effort by WXXI News to inform and transform attitudes and behavior about inclusion. The Inclusion Desk grew from the Move to Include partnership between WXXI and the Golisano Foundation. Through programming and special events, WXXI and the Golisano Foundation look to build a more inclusive community by inspiring and motivating people to embrace different abilities and include all people in every aspect of community life.

Eastman Dental celebrating 100 years

Jun 9, 2017
urmc.rochester.edu/dentistry/centennial.aspx

The Eastman Dental Institute for Oral Health is celebrating 100 years since George Eastman opened his first dental dispensary in the city of Rochester.

"Rochester was the first place, but then he opened additional dispensaries in Europe, in London, in Rome, in Brussels, in Stockholm and in Paris," said Dr. Eli Eliav, director of the Eastman Institute for Oral Health.

Eliav says there weren't many philanthropists that supported dentistry the way Eastman did.

There's a lot going on in the local autism community: The U of R has the brand-new Levine Autism Clinic. On South Avenue, there are plans for the new Golisano Autism Center. And this weekend, national experts will be in town to give talks, run workshops, and help lead a conference on autism. So what does the latest research tell us? Our guests:

  • Suzannah Iadarola, Ph.D., assistant professor of pediatrics at UR Medicine’s Golisano Children’s Hospital
  • Chris Hilton, mother, and finance and operations director for AutismUp
  • Terrie Meyn, COO of CP Rochester

This conversation is part of WXXI’s Inclusion Desk, spotlighting issues related to disabilities. The WXXI Inclusion Desk is part of Move to Include — a partnership to encourage thoughtful discussion about issues of inclusion and the differently-abled.

Randy Gorbman / WXXI News

Area law enforcement agencies joined dozens of Special Olympics athletes on Friday for a torch run from Gates Town Hall to Downtown Rochester.

The event raises money for Special Olympics, and that’s something that participants like Kenny Moriarty of Rochester really appreciate.

“It’s incredible, the flames and the running, you’re doing the exercise.” Moriarty also told WXXI News he really appreciates “the sponsors and all the thanks and all the help we get.”

Artist Laural Hartman recently invited WXXI into her studio. As we know with art, there’s generally a deeper meaning behind a painting, drawing or sculpture. With Hartman’s work, we’re awakened to a life experience with several layers - some of which resonate with many of us and others we’ve never encountered until now.

Hartman, also a faculty member at RIT’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf joins Tabitha Jacques, Director of the Joseph F. and Helen C. Dyer Arts Center at RIT to explain what mainstream museums may not understand about the specialty of deaf art.

While the American Health Care Act is being considered by Congress, local disability rights advocates are taking action. They’re calling on President Trump to support the Disability Integration Act (DIA). They’re also calling for people with disabilities to have a voice in the health care reform debate. One of those advocates who recently traveled to Washington is Ericka Jones of the Center for Disability Rights.

Jones joined a demonstration outside the White House which led to more than 80 arrests according to the disability rights group ADAPT. She explains the potential impact of the DIA on all sectors of the community.

School districts throughout Rochester are battling a storm of unknowns. The federal health care bill which is a repeal of the Affordable Care Act is calling for $880 billion in cuts to Medicaid over the next ten years. Why does that matter to public school districts? It ultimately affects services delivered to some of their most vulnerable students - those in special education.

Susan Hetherington – director of the Strong Center for Developmental Disabilities at the University of Rochester - explains some of the potential implications of the health care bill for students.

This story is from WXXI's  Inclusion Desk, part of our Move to Include partnership between WXXI and the Golisano Foundation designed to promote inclusion for people with intellectual and physical disabilities.

The repeal of the Affordable Care Act could have some unintended consequences on the most vulnerable: children with disabilities. On this special Move to Include edition of Need to Know we’ll learn how special education in our public schools may see unbearable funding cuts.

Also on the show, some local disability rights advocates were recently detained outside the White House. We’ll discuss what they’re calling on President Trump to do and if he’s responded.

And a complex journey for a local artist unfolds on canvas. How local talent is awakening our understanding of deaf culture through art.

Move to Include and the Inclusion Desk is a partnership between WXXI and the Golisano Foundation designed to promote inclusion for people with intellectual and physical disabilities.

There are several unanswered questions about the repeal of the Affordable Care Act - including what it means for special education students. As the new health bill stands right now - it would cut assistance to children in special ed. We’ll break down the potential changes.

Plus, you'll experience a world unfamiliar to many through the lens of deaf artists. Learn how local talent is awakening our understanding of their lives through their work.

Area lawmakers gathered at the Gates Chili High School field house Thursday to announce $200,000 in state funds to help expand Unified Champion Schools.

That's a program that brings together students with and without intellectual disabilities through education, sports and youth leadership.

It promotes inclusion through shared sport training and competition experiences.

Neal Johnson is the president and CEO of Special Olympics-New York.   He says this program can help battle issues like bullying and harassment.

Golisano Autism Center to be built in Rochester

May 16, 2017

Several agencies are working together on a new facility to provide comprehensive services for the more than 10,000 people diagnosed with autism in the Greater Rochester and surrounding area.

The Al Sigl Community of Agencies, along with the Mary Cariola Center, AutismUp and CP Rochester are collaborating on the new Golisano Autism Center to serve the greater Rochester region.

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