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So far this year, there were 462 reported drug overdoses in Monroe County; 68 of them were fatal.

A Rochester-based addiction recovery support group is expanding its efforts to respond to the ongoing opioid crisis.

Recovery Now NY is opening a new, monthly drop-in center in Irondequoit tonight where people struggling with substance abuse and their families can go to get learn about treatment and services.  It’s located at Glad Tidings Church at 1980 Culver Road.

Congressman Tom Reed declared his adamant opposition to the use of heroin injection sites recently.

The Southern Tier Republican says the proposal is made by “extremists on the left.”

"To me it’s just an extreme position that is dangerous to our communities given the nature of what we’re talking about, given the response and feedback I’ve heard from law enforcement officers, in regards to creating a culture attracting those that would push and distribute."

A New York State Assembly bill was submitted to allow cities to create their own heroin injection sites.

University of Rochester

A national conference held at the University of Rochester Saturday focused on battling the opioid crisis.

The Center for Leading Innovation and Collaboration or CLIC hosted the daylong session of meetings, to discuss how to best address opioid misuse and abuse through translational science.

But what is translational science?

Co-director of CLIC, Martin Zand explains.

siena.edu

A new poll from Siena College shows that 90% of New Yorkers say the current opioid crisis is worse than previous public health crises.

An overwhelming majority of New Yorkers also supports strengthening prescription monitoring services; 82% say doctors should be punished for over prescribing.

But when it comes down to how the addiction started, Research Institute Director Don Levy says New Yorkers are divided on who is to blame.

Billboards with a warning to drug dealers

May 3, 2018
JVANBREDERODE@townofgates.org

Law enforcement and the private sector are teaming up to send a message to drug dealers:

If you deal drugs and someone dies, you're going to prison for homicide.

That's what it says on a billboard near High Falls that was unveiled this morning.

Gary Rogers, owner of Dock Hardware, paid for it.

He said one of his employees was personally affected by the opioid crisis.

siena.edu

  

The latest Siena College poll on opioids says 24% of New Yorkers were prescribed opioids in the last two years.

Don Levy, Research Institute Director at Siena College says in the third part of their polling series on the epidemic, they wanted to know what happens in the doctor’s office.

Alex Crichton

Treating opioid addiction as a crime isn't an adequate way to deal with this crisis.

That's according to the 16th Surgeon General of the United States, Dr. David Satcher, who returned today to the University of Rochester Medical School, where he completed his residency in 1972 and received an honorary degree in 1995.

He says treating the opioid epidemic like we treated the cocaine problem in the 1980s just won't work.

A recent poll illustrates the stigma surrounding drug addiction.

More than three-quarters of New Yorkers who responded to a Siena College survey about the opioid crisis say the moral failings of those who are addicted is a contributing factor in the epidemic.

At the same time, people hold the opposing view that addiction is a disease.

siena.edu

A new Siena Poll addressing the state's opioid epidemic shows that 54% of New Yorkers are personally touched by opioid abuse.

Director of the Siena College Research Institute Don Levy says there is no argument that this is an epidemic.

"When we said has it touched your life? Is someone in your family, is someone you are friendly with, someone you know from work, do you know someone who has died from an overdose...when you look and say how many people meet at least one of those conditions, its nearly six out of 10 New Yorkers, it’s an astronomical figure."

It’s not everyday that you hear about a neighborhood, plagued with drug sales and use, coming together and saying: “We have had enough, no more!” That’s exactly what’s happening right now in the City of Rochester’s North Clinton Avenue neighborhood. It’s an area so synonymous with drug activity, some refer to it as “Heroin Alley.” On this edition of Need to Know, you’ll see it’s also a place working to forge a new path.

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