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Health & Medical News

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A local breast cancer activist believes new state laws that expand breast cancer screening will make a difference for women who can't find the time or resources to get a regular mammogram.

The legislative package requires 210 hospitals and clinics across the state to expand the hours when they offer screenings.

In addition to their regular hours, facilities must add four additional hours per week, either in the morning ( 7 a.m. to 9 a.m.) evening ( 5 p.m. to 7.pm.) or on the weekends.

There's a new name for Visiting Nurse Service of Rochester and Monroe County and its affiliates. The organization will now be known as UR Medicine Home Care.

That brand will include various services that are now under the Visiting Nurse banner as well as Meals on Wheels of Monroe County.

Officials say the main reason for the rebranding is to promote the community's awareness that Visiting Nurse Service and the other home health providers are part of UR Medicine.

freeimages.com/Pierre Amerlynck

Today is the Summer Solstice, the longest day of the year. It also happens to be one of the hottest. 

Certified geriatrician Dr. Brian Heppard is hoping the symbolism drives home the point of his 6-day, 350-mile bike tour through the Finger Lakes.

The event is intended to raise funds for Alzheimer's services and research and call attention to the seemingly endless journey facing anyone diagnosed with the disease and their caretakers.

www.minorities.affordablehealthinsurance.org

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York is poised to expand access to breast cancer screening under an agreement reached by top state lawmakers and Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who made combating the cancer a priority after the successful cancer treatment of his girlfriend, Food Network star Sandra Lee.

Under the deal, the state would order hospitals to expand hours when mammograms are offered and require insurance companies to eliminate deductibles and co-pays for the screening and some other diagnostic tests.

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York lawmakers have passed a bill to require that hospitals post statements explaining patient protections against surprise medical bills and patients' right to designate a caregiver to receive instructions about post-discharge care.

Sponsors say the notification requirement follows two major recent changes in New York law on patient rights.

Consumer protections against surprise medical bills took effect in April 2015.

freeimages.com/Lotus Head

A decade or so ago, it was thought that cancer patients should focus on rest to allow their body to heal from treatments.

There's been a big shift that thinking since then, and a new study from the University of Rochester’s Wilmot Cancer Institute confirms the idea that exercise can help patients with some of the symptoms of chemotherapy.

Rochester's Zoo Director isn't commenting on the process followed at the Cincinnati Zoo when an endangered gorilla was shot and killed after a young boy fell into its enclosure.

But Larry Sorel says zoo officials there had to make a very tough decision in a highly emotional time, and they did what they thought was best.

He says Seneca Park Zoo, an accredited quality zoo by the Association of Zoos and Aquarium, has very strict emergency procedures and protocols in place, in the event of any kind of emergency.

onpoint.wbur.org

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York lawmakers are considering legislation to limit the amount of prescription opioid drugs patients can get after an initial visit to the doctor's office, part of an effort to reduce the amount of pills that accumulate in medicine cabinets and help fuel a statewide addiction crisis.

Slaughter on New Superbug Discovery

May 27, 2016

Congresswoman Louise Slaughter says she's been sounding the alarm for years about the overuse of antibiotics. 

Now, a superbug has been discovered.

Representative Slaughter, the only microbiologist in Congress, says this is a result of feeding antibiotics to healthy livestock so they can grow faster and fatter, and deliver more money at market.

Slaughter cites a government-backed report from British economist Lord Jim O'Neill, which says by the year 2050, 10 million people could die each year from so-called "superbugs."

Post Concussion Problems in the Classroom

May 20, 2016
npr.org

A new University of Rochester study looks at whether students are experiencing problems in school after suffering a concussion compared to other sports-related injuries.

The study shows females and those who have suffered 2 or more previous concussions are still having problems academically one month after their injury.

Erin Wasserman  is a sports injury epidemiologist at UNC Chapel Hill.

She was lead author of the study at the U of R. 

The research group is also from the U of R.

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