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film

A new documentary explores the aftermath of the 2015 mass shooting at the Boys and Girls Club in Rochester. Raekwon Manigault, Jonah Barley and Johnny Johnson Junior were killed during the shooting, which took place during a Stop the Violence basketball tournament. In Move, first-time filmmaker Tam Little speaks with the victims' families and with community members who came together to reduce the violence in their neighborhoods. The film will be screened at The Little Theatre on December 12 and December 15. It's part of the One Take Documentary Series and the Black Cinema Series. The screening on December 15 is sponsored in part by the Association of Black Journalists. 

Little joins us to share what she learned, and we'll hear from the victims' mothers about how they are carrying on their sons' legacies. Our guests:

  • Tameakia Little, filmmaker
  • Anita Barley, mother of Jonah Barley 
  • Lentory Johnson, mother of Johnny Johnson
  • Tammy Burnett, mother of Raekwon Manigault

The movie It broke box office records for late summer, which means two things: Stephen King remains popular, and clowns remain horrifying. Okay, that second part is probably unfair, but Pennywise the Dancing Clown has cast a frightening figure in the film.

So why are we so afraid of clowns? It didn't start with the book version of It, which dropped in the mid-1980s. In facts, it goes way back in literature. But modern-day clowns want to make the case that we don't have to be afraid. We explore the history of our fears and the reality of this offbeat profession. Our guests:

  • Roscoe the Court Jester
  • Richard Hughson, member of Flower City Vaudeville
  • Sky Sands, comedian
  • Abby DeVuyst, librarian, improviser, and actor

The ImageOut Film Festival is back. It showcases films and other creative works that promote LGBT arts and cultural experiences.

We preview this year’s films and talk to the organizers. Our guests:

Throughout time, you may go back and watch a movie that you loved as a child, but now, it plays differently to you. There's something that feels uncomfortable; something has changed. 

If you watch Coming to America, National Lampoon's Vacation, Dumbo, Peter Pan, and many other popular films, you'll find examples of racism, sexism, and homophobia.

This hour, we explore how perceptions of art -- particularly of films -- evolve over time. Our guests:

  • Jack Garner, longtime film critic
  • Lester D. Friedman, professor and former chair of the Media and Society Program at Hobart and William Smith College, and co-author of Monstrous Progeny
  • Bri Merkel, artistic director for The Little Theatre
  • Jonathan Ntheketha, actor, performance educator with Impact Interactive, and senior assistant director of the Multicultural Center for Academic Success in RIT's Division for Diversity and Inclusion

Wonder Woman and feminism in film The newest superhero film from the DC universe has generated a slew of controversy. Even before Wonder Woman opened in theatres on June 2, it sparked conversations about feminism in film, the role of female superheroes, and yes, even debates over armpit hair. Wonder Woman dates back to 1941, and the origins of the character may surprise you.

We talk about Wonder Woman's history, how she has evolved, if she's a feminist icon, and the roles of women on screen and on stage.

  • Abby DeVuyst, librarian, comedian, and actor
  • Michelle Finn, deputy historian for the City of Rochester and Wonder Woman scholar
  • Jackie McGriff, administrative assistant for development at WXXI, and self-described film nut
  • Adam Lubitow, film critic for City Newspaper
  • Sady Fischer, queer Latina activist and diversity consultant
  • Alexa Scott-Flaherty, director of "Twelfth Night" at Blackfriars Theatre

Despite condemnation by the American Medical Association and all the major mental health professions, conversion  therapy designed to change a person's sexual orientation from homosexual or bisexual to heterosexual is still prevalent across the United States. Only five states and Washington, D.C. have outlawed the practice for licensed mental health providers. In fact, there may be hundreds of reparative therapy centers, but many are underground or protected by religious freedom laws. Researchers say the treatments -- which range from talk therapy to electroshock therapy -- have dangerous consequences.

A new film shot in and around Rochester tells the story of a gay teen's experience with conversion therapy. Our guests are from that film, Fair Haven:

  • Tom Malloy, producer and actor who plays Reverend Thomas
  • Kerstin Karlhuber, director
  • Jack Bryant, writer
  • Gregory Harrison, actor who plays Dr. Gallagher

We preview this Sunday's Academy Awards. Our guests give their predictions for who will win, who should win, and we discuss how this year's Oscar nominations have ended the diversity drought. Our guests:

  • Jack Garner, longtime film critic
  • Lester D. Friedman, professor and former chair of the Media and Society Program at Hobart and William Smith College
  • Adam Lubitow, film critic for City Newspaper

It was semi-retired renowned film critic and writer, Jack Garner, who said: “I’ve been on top of Mount Everest. I’ve flown around Big Ben with Peter Pan...and I’ve stormed the beaches of Normandy in Saving Private Ryan.” Garner says movies have the power to transport us to places we never imagined we could see or visit. And he says the key to a worthwhile journey for the movie-watcher is all about originality of ideas in the film. With the Academy Awards right around the corner, Jack Garner joins this segment of Need to Know to share his thoughts on the nominated films this year and the ones you must-see before Oscar night on Sunday, February 26.

The Little Theatre is getting ready to show a powerful film called I Am Not Your Negro. Here's how the filmmakers describe it:

"In 1979, James Baldwin wrote a letter to his literary agent describing his new endeavor: the writing of his final book, Remember This House, recounting the lives and successive assassinations of his friends Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King, Jr. Baldwin was not able to complete the book before his death, and the unfinished manuscript was entrusted to director Raoul Peck. Built exclusively around Baldwin's words, Peck's I Am Not Your Negro delves into the complex legacy of three lives (and deaths) that permanently marked the American social and political landscape. Framing the unfinished work as a radical narration about race in America, Peck matches Baldwin's lyrical rhetoric with rich archival footage of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements, and connects these historical struggles for justice and equality to the present-day movements that have taken shape in response to the killings of young African-American men including Trayvon Martin, Tamir Rice, Mike Brown, and Amir Brooks."

Our guests discuss the film, and this particular American moment. In studio:

  • Richard McCullough, meteorologist and president of the Rochester Association of Black Journalists
  • Dr. David Anderson, history re-enactor and community leader
  • Bri Merkel, artistic director for The Little Theatre

www.kodak.com

(AP) Kodak says some of Hollywood is still hanging on to film, pointing to 29 Academy Award nominations for movies captured on its 35 mm and 16 mm Motion Picture Film stock as proof of its success.

Kodak says "La La Land," ''Fences," ''Hidden Figures," ''Jackie," ''Nocturnal Animals," ''Loving," ''Silence," ''Suicide Squad," and "Hail Caesar!" are among movies whose producers have bucked the digital cinematography trend.

Kodak is the last big supplier of motion picture film. Competitor Fujifilm stopped its production in 2013.

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