WXXI AM News

Megan Mack

Connections Producer

Megan Mack the producer of Connections with Evan Dawson and Unleashed: The Pet Show. She joined the WXXI News team from WHEC-TV, where she produced newscasts and The Olympic Zone, and from the University of Rochester, where she served as an assistant director of public relations. Her background extends to television sports and entertainment, and to communications and social media management for non-profits.

Megan earned her B.S. in Television-Radio-Film from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, and her B.A. in Italian Language, Literature, and Culture from the College of Arts and Sciences at Syracuse University. She is also a graduate of The Second City’s Conservatory program.

Ways to Connect

Weekend Connections is a collection of some of the most noteworthy moments from the week on Connections with Evan Dawson. This episode includes conversations about:

  • Affirmative action at universities, with Hobart and William Smith Colleges President Gregory Vincent;
  • How Native American history and culture are taught in schools;
  • Diversity in high school reading lists;
  • Intimate partner violence.

Weekend Connections is a collection of some of the most noteworthy moments from the week on Connections with Evan Dawson. This episode includes conversations about:

  • Rochester's Climate Action Plan;
  • Truth in comedy, with comedian Mike Birbiglia;
  • How the Declaration of Independence and American history are taught in schools;
  • Misconceptions about people who are blind, with Saudi disability rights activist Mohammed Saad.

Weekend Connections is a collection of some of the most noteworthy moments from the week on Connections with Evan Dawson. This episode includes conversations about:

  • Access to birth certificates and family information for people who have been adopted in New York State*;
  • The therapeutic benefits of friendship for people with mental illness;
  • The value of print reporting, and a small-town newspaper that won a Pulitzer Prize.

*Correction: In the podcast, the host and producer say the legislation has passed the New York State Assembly, but the bill has passed both the Assembly and the Senate.

Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Dennis Cantrell/ Creative Commons License / U.S. Navy

First hour: Innovation Hub explores the American Dream

Second hour: The Capitol Steps

Weekend Connections is a collection of some of the most noteworthy moments from the week on Connections with Evan Dawson. This episode includes conversations about:

  • A disability rights activist's experience in Washington, D.C., while protesting potential cuts to Medicaid;
  • How journalists decide what to cover and what not to cover;
  • The differences between cultural appropriation and cultural exchange;
  • The benefits of integrating geothermal and solar energy systems in homes.

Weekend Connections is a collection of some of the most noteworthy moments from the week on Connections with Evan Dawson. This episode includes conversations about:

  • What life is like in a refugee camp;
  • The Champion Academy and how to help students living in poverty*;
  • Pride month and efforts to build a more inclusive movement;
  • Music and activism, with singer Bethany Yarrow.

As a child, singer Bethany Yarrow was surrounded by a family of activists who loved folk music. That's because her father is Peter Yarrow of Peter, Paul, and Mary. As an adult, her musical tastes drifted to other genres, but eventually, she went back to her roots and was inspired by how folk music can convey important messages.

She and her partner, cellist Rufus Capadoccia, have performed and participated in demonstrations all over the world in support of causes like the environmental movement, the Dakota Access Pipeline, and more.

Yarrow is in town for a performance in the Finger Lakes, but first, she's our guest on Connections. We talk to her about her activism and music with meaning.

Wonder Woman and feminism in film The newest superhero film from the DC universe has generated a slew of controversy. Even before Wonder Woman opened in theatres on June 2, it sparked conversations about feminism in film, the role of female superheroes, and yes, even debates over armpit hair. Wonder Woman dates back to 1941, and the origins of the character may surprise you.

We talk about Wonder Woman's history, how she has evolved, if she's a feminist icon, and the roles of women on screen and on stage.

  • Abby DeVuyst, librarian, comedian, and actor
  • Michelle Finn, deputy historian for the City of Rochester and Wonder Woman scholar
  • Jackie McGriff, administrative assistant for development at WXXI, and self-described film nut
  • Adam Lubitow, film critic for City Newspaper
  • Sady Fischer, queer Latina activist and diversity consultant
  • Alexa Scott-Flaherty, director of "Twelfth Night" at Blackfriars Theatre

NPR

First hour: Wonder Woman and feminism in film

Second hour: Singer and activist Bethany Yarrow

The annual Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival kicks off Friday.

Festival founder John Nugent joins us in studio to preview the acts, share some behind-the-scenes stories, and talk about how the festival has grown over the last 16 years. We also hear from two of this year’s performers: Laura Dubin and Mike Cottone.

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