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Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

Bernie Sanders swept all three Democratic caucuses that were held on Saturday, according to the Associated Press.

He took each state by a striking margin. In Washington state — the biggest prize for Sanders, where 101 pledged delegates were up for grabs — Sanders won with 73 percent of the vote.

In Alaska, with 16 pledged delegates were at stake, Sanders won with 82 percent; and in Hawaii, with 25 delegates, the senator from Vermont won with 70 percent.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry says that Americans were among those killed in Tuesday's terrorist attacks in Belgium's capital, which killed at least 31 people and injured hundreds more.

Speaking in Brussels on Friday, Kerry said he was grieving with "the loved ones of those who have been very cruelly taken from us — including Americans."

The director of the State Department Press Office has since specified that two U.S. citizens were killed in the attacks.

It's the first confirmation of American deaths in the attacks.

U.N. judges have found former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic guilty of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity in Srebrenica and other areas of Bosnia during the war there during the 1990s.

Karadzic was acquitted of one of two charges of genocide in Muslim regions of Bosnia. He was sentenced to 40 years in prison, with allowance for the time he has already spent behind bars. He has been held since 2008.

A day after terrorist attacks in Brussels claimed by ISIS killed at least 31 people and wounded at least 270 others, police continue to search for a suspected accomplice.

The man in question, wearing a hat and light-colored jacket, was seen with two suspected suicide bombers on closed-circuit TV at the Brussels airport Tuesday morning, shortly before two explosions went off at the airport and one bomb was set off at a metro station.

The Los Angeles Police Department is currently testing a knife that was allegedly discovered years ago at the former home of O.J. Simpson, who was acquitted in the 1994 murders of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ron Goldman.

Capt. Andrew Neiman of the LAPD said in a press conference Friday that the knife had been in the possession of a now-retired police officer.

After 41 days, the Oregon occupation is over: All four militants who remained at an occupied wildlife refuge have surrendered to the FBI.

The U.S. economy added just 151,000 jobs in January while unemployment dropped slightly, to 4.9 percent, according to the latest figures from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Economists had expected to see about 190,000 new jobs.

The unemployment rate, which has held steady at 5 percent the past few months, dropped slightly to 4.9 percent. It's the first time unemployment has fallen below 5 percent since the recession.

An earthquake of magnitude 7.1 struck the southern coast of Alaska early Sunday, the U.S. Geological Survey says. The quake, which was centered just over 160 miles southwest of Anchorage, hit at 1:30 a.m. local time (5:30 a.m. EST), waking up many residents of Alaska's largest city.

Tsai Ing-Wen, of Taiwan's pro-independence party, claimed victory in the nation's presidential elections on Saturday night.

With the vote count still underway, Tsai led with 60 percent of the vote, indicating a landslide victory; the ruling Nationalist party conceded defeat.

That makes Tsai the self-governing island's first female president.

Iran is releasing four Iranian-American prisoners Saturday, as part of a prisoner swap with the U.S.

The release, originally reported by Iranian state media, has been confirmed by U.S. officials. Iran is also releasing a fifth American detainee, separate from the exchange.

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