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Closing the state budget deficit - it's the $4.4B question

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) - New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo vowed to fight back against Washington Republicans on Tuesday with a $168 billion state budget proposal that lays out spending on schools and mass transit while also confronting greater uncertainty in federal funding. Cuomo said he'll urge lawmakers to consider restructuring the state tax system to soften the blow of the new federal tax overhaul enacted by Republicans. One idea is a new payroll tax which would largely replace the current income...

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Rochester, NY – A Rochester-area state senator is amending legislation to expand the so-called "Son of Sam" law -- in light of reports that an inmate at the Elmira Correctional Facility made nearly $1 million by investing in the stock market.

Republican Michael Nozzolio of Seneca County says he'll introduce legislation to cofiscate any profits a prisoner makes from "non-sanctioned ventures" while behind bars. Nozzolio would turn the money over to the state Crime Victims Assistance Fund, to be used in aiding crime victims.

Rochester, NY – The new heart transplant program at the University of Rochester Medical Center has performed its first proceedure. The heart transplant was performed early yesterday morning...on a 58 year old Rochester man. Patient David Beatson was the first to be placed on the cardiac transplant list at Strong Memorial Hospital.

He's in stable condition, and doctors say he's doing well.

Rochester, NY – Senator Charles Schumer says the Senate Judiciary Committee heard "devestating testimony" today about the effects of proposed airline mergers on New York.

Schumer is calling on the Justice Department and the White House to block the wave of airline mergers sweeping the industry until the stituation can be studied. Senator Schumer says he plans to talk with Transportation Secretary Norman Minetta to get his point across.

Rochester, NY – The Rochester Institute of Technology has announced plans for a new high-tech college.

R-I-T's eighth college will be a school of Computer and Information Sciences. It will bring together all the high-tech fields already taught at the school into a single discipline.

R-I-T officials have been raising millions of dollars required to add the new college. They believe it will increase enrollment by another one-thousand students.

Rochester, NY – A disability rights advocate wants to work with Amtrak on emergency evacuation for wheelchair users -- after being involved in Monday's train wreck near Syracuse.

Teresa Carroll of Rochester is a quadraplegic who gets around in an electric wheelchair. She's on the board of directors of Rochester's Center for Independent Living.

Seven members of the center were taking the train to a legislative breakfast in Albany. The train had just left Syracuse when it slammed into the rear of a CSX freight train.

Rochester NY – The American Classical Music Hall of Fame is honoring the founder of the Eastman Wind Ensemble. Frederick Fennell has been selected as one of this year's inductees. The director of the Eastman School of Music calls Fennell " a music legend". The induction ceremony will take place April 21st in Cincinnati Ohio.

    Rochester NY – The University of Rochester Medical Center will receive over one million dollars from the American Cancer Society. The grant will go towards helping medical researchers understand the cause of nausea from chemotherapy. Nausea is one of the most serious side effects from undergoing chemotheraphy treatment for cancer.Scientists have recently developed new drugs that better control vomiting. But they are not as effective when it comes to reducing nausea.

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      Coverage of harassment claims against faculty at the University of Rochester

      News from NPR

      Americans are split on whether they think the Justice Department's Russia investigation is fair and are unsure of special counsel Robert Mueller, but they overwhelmingly believe he should be allowed to finish his investigation, according to a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll.

      Fewer than half of Americans (48 percent) think the Russia probe has been fair, more than a quarter (28 percent) think it has not been and another quarter are unsure (23 percent).

      The institutions that have been the pillars of U.S. politics and capitalism are crumbling.

      That is one finding from the latest NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll, which shows Americans have limited confidence in its public schools, courts, organized labor and banks — and even less confidence in big business, the presidency, the political parties and the media.

      Colin Campbell needs help dressing, bathing and moving between his bed and his wheelchair. He has a feeding tube because his partially paralyzed tongue makes swallowing "almost impossible," he says.

      Campbell, 58, spends $4,000 a month on home health care services so he can continue to live in his home just outside Los Angeles. Eight years ago, he was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or "Lou Gehrig's disease," which relentlessly attacks the nerve cells in his brain and spinal cord and has no cure.

      Accidental deaths in the United States rose significantly in 2016, becoming the third-leading cause of fatalities for the first time in more than a century – a trend fueled by the steep rise in opioid overdoses, the National Safety Council reports.

      Accidents — defined by the council as unintentional, preventable injuries — claimed a record 161,374 lives in 2016, a 10 percent increase over 2015. They include motor vehicle crashes, falls, drowning, chocking and poisoning, a category that encompasses accidental overdoses.

      More news from NPR

      From the Inclusion Desk

      Classically trained violinist and songwriter Gaelynn Lea has been immersed in music since her childhood. While she says her primary focus in life is on her career as a musician, it was her rise to fame after winning the 2016 NPR Tiny Desk contest when she also took on a new role - that of a disability advocate and public speaker.  During a recent concert in Rochester at Nazareth College, Lea told Need to Know that the underrepresentation of people with disabilities in the arts has given her a new stage to share a powerful message.

      We conclude our Dialogue on Disability Week with a conversation about "invisible" disabilities. Our guests share the challenges they face living with multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. In studio:

      freeimages.com/Jos van Galen

      Some 2,000 Rochester area residents with disabilities are in need of housing.

      And that number only reflects individuals who get services through one state agency, the New York State Office of People With Developmental Disabilities.  The overall need for affordable, accessible housing is even greater.

      This has always been an issue, but it's become a bigger problem in recent years, as more people are interested in living independently.

      Our Dialogue on Disability Week continues with a conversation about adaptive sports. According to the CDC, nearly half of adults with disabilities ages 18 to 64 do not get aerobic physical activity. Local organizations are helping to change that by offering opportunities in adaptive sports.

      We hear the stories of local athletes in those programs. Our guests:

      • Michael Cocquyt, supervisor of SportsNet
      • Jen Truscott, alpine skier
      • David Grace, sled hockey athlete, who participates in many winter sports

      More stories from the Inclusion Desk

      Rochester: Hub For Photonics

      What is photonics and why is it coming to Rochester?

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