WXXI AM News

Opioid Crisis: The Ripple Effect

As part of a public media collaborative funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, WXXI News and partners Oregon Public Broadcasting and ideastream in Ohio present a special series, Opioid Crisis: The Ripple Effect.

The reporting series will look at the people and issues indirectly affected by the opioid crisis and make the case that the epidemic’s ripple effects impact many. 

We want to hear what you have to say about opioid and heroin use in our community. Please click on this link to take a short survey.

 

Opioid epidemic fueling rise in deadly heart infections

Apr 14, 2018
ideastream

While statistics about overdose deaths from the opioid epidemic continue to dominate headlines, other debilitating and costly problems have been creeping up in the shadows.

Doctors across the country are increasingly worried about the rise of bacterial infections attacking the heart valves of IV drug users — a condition known as infective endocarditis.

Patients in Oregon embrace medical cannabis as opioid alternative — without guidance

Apr 14, 2018
Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB

Dawn Faihtinger is in her 60s and lives in an RV at a park on the Oregon coast.

She’s been battling pain for nearly 50 years, ever since she was hit by a car as a teenager.

“I was in a coma for seven weeks,” she said. “I had a compound fracture of my right leg. Had my skull split open.”

Faihtinger later learned she had multiple sclerosis. She spent 15 years in a wheelchair and on heavy doses of opioids, including Oxycodone and fentanyl.

Randy Gorbman / WXXI News

Abuse of opioid drugs has cost the U.S. a lot of money in a number of ways. That includes a big impact on business, particularly the construction industry.


The people, the stories, the addiction. On a special edition of Need to Know we examine what you likely haven’t heard about the heroin and opioid crisis and the epidemic’s ripple effects impacting our region. It's part of our series Opioid Crisis: The Ripple Effect.

David Marshall

Opioids can have devastating consequences for the people who abuse them, affecting their health, safety and freedom – but it doesn’t stop there.

Drug abuse can ruin the lives of people who never touch the substances themselves.

Stephanie Forrester is 37, from Fairport. She has two kids: a son and a daughter. She said they grew up around her addiction.

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