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It’s been one year since The University of Rochester took on the role as the Educational Partnership Organization for East High School.

Superintendent of the Lower and Upper schools Shaun Nelms said that year one has been about identifying the root issues they plan to address with this partnership. The list ranged from low attendance rates and curriculum changes, to behavioral problems, and student teacher relations.

The statistic Nelms was most proud of was increased retention rates from grade 9 to grade 10.

East High School | University of Rochester

You could call it the most watched school in Rochester. East High School is kicking off year two in its collaboration with the University of Rochester. On this edition of Need to Know we learn what’s in store for this new school year as this innovative intervention continues to unfold.

Also on the show, photonics is now in Rochester and eventually the jobs promised will be here too. We’ll tell you how local schools are preparing their students to cash in on the booming industry.

And in the midst of continued turmoil and unrest in South Sudan, hope springs forth. How the Rochester-South Sudan partnership is bringing new opportunities to the youth of Mayan-Abun.

Randy Gorbman / WXXI News

About 1,300 University of Rochester new and incoming students  were all around the Rochester Monday as part of the annual Wilson Day activities.

That’s an event that’s been going on for more than 25 years, where the students go out to help a number of community agencies with everything from gardening to interacting with seniors.

U of R president Joel Seligman notes that Wilson Day was named after a founder of  Xerox, Joseph Wilson.

Caitlin Whyte / WXXI News

Graduate students, faculty and union officials gathered on the Wilson Quad at the University of Rochester on Wednesday to say that the graduate assistants at the U of R will try to form their own union.

That’s after the National Labor Relations Board ruled this week that graduate students who assist in teaching and research at private universities have a right to union representation.

This ruling reverses the 2004 Brown University decision that blocked graduate students from collective bargaining.

Born In the USA is perhaps one of the most misunderstood songs in American history. This week, we've heard several radio stations play it as an homage to American greatness at the Olympics. Someone should tell them the song is about how awful our country was to Vietnam veterans.

But that has us wondering: what are the most mistaken or misunderstood pieces of art across the genres? From music to painting to poetry to literature, our panel tells us where we're routinely going wrong. (We're looking at you, Guy With the Road Not Taken Poster.) Our guests:

We open the hour with a conversation with Noam Chomsky, the scientist, linguist, philosopher, and social critic. Chomsky will have events later this week at the University of Rochester and The Little Theatre.*

Then we talk to University staff and students about the Chomsky visit. Our guests:

  • Ted Brown, professor of history, medical humanities, and public health and policy at the University of Rochester
  • Jeff Runner, professor and chair of the Department of Linguistics at the University of Rochester
  • Jesse Bernstein, class of 2018

*Please note: The event at The Little Theatre is sold out.

rochester.edu

The Norovirus numbers in a recent outbreak at the University of Rochester have increased.

University Health Service now reports that the total number of students from the River Campus and the Eastman School of Music showing symptoms of the virus over the last several days is 95.

That was as of Thursday. Most of the cases were at the River Campus, just three cases have been reported so far at the Eastman School of Music.

Non-tenured faculty members at the University of Rochester are considering forming a union to help adjunct and contingent professors improve their compensation. They could join colleagues at more than 40 colleges around the country who have unionized.

Those who support unionization say it would improve adjunct faculty members’ standard of living, provide a more stable environment for students, and increase retention and graduation rates. Opponents argue that it will result in fewer jobs, larger class sizes, and less money being available for scholarships and tuition relief.  

Our panel discusses both sides of the issue. Our guests:

  • Lisa Cerami, adjunct professor of German at Nazareth College
  • Matt Witten, adjunct professor of contemporary music at the University of Rochester, Monroe Community College, Finger Lakes Community College, Rowan University, and D’Youville College
  • Christopher Niemiec, senior lecturer in psychology at the University of Rochester
  • Miles Meth, University of Rochester student in favor of the union
  • Darya Nicol, University of Rochester student in favor of the union

This past fall, a group of students at the University of Rochester created a list of demands and concerns surrounding inclusion and diversity on campus. University administrators promised a thorough review and a constructive approach. But now, some of those students are saying they don't feel the university has responded with genuine concern or urgency.

We bring both sides together to talk about it. Our guests:

The expression, "I saw it with my own eyes," conveys a level of truth, but is seeing always believing?

University of Rochester professor Joan Saab is researching visual hoaxes from the 19th century and why people are willing to suspend their disbelief. We talk about why the "petrified man" -- also known as the Cardiff Giant -- and the bat-like people and unicorns of the Great Moon Hoax captured the imaginations of people around the world even after it was clear the stories were not true. Saab will give a presentation on the subject Wednesday evening at the University of Rochester.

Also, you may have noticed that Thomas Jefferson has been quoted frequently by politicians, but in many cases, the quotes are misattributed. We explore the relationship between hearing or reading and believing by looking at the use of spurious quotes. Our guests:

  • Joan Saab, associate professor of art history and visual and cultural studies at the University of Rochester
  • Anna Berkes, research librarian at the Jefferson Library at Monticello

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