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teaching

Musician redefines herself after hearing loss

Apr 4, 2018
Photo Credit: Eastman School of Music

Gaelen McCormick has been losing her hearing, to varying degrees over several years as a result of Ménière’s disease – a condition that also causes vertigo and tinnitus.

"My husband and I have a morning ritual. Wake up, and the first thing he says, is “I love you” and the next thing I can say is “I can hear you” or “I can’t hear you” – and that’s how we start our day." 

The loss of hearing was a particular challenge for McCormick because of her profession: she is a musician.

Karen DeWitt / WXXI News

New York State's Teacher of the Year is back in studio. Christopher Albrecht is a fourth grade teacher at the Fred W. Hill School in Brockport. He joins us to discuss the value of community service and service-based learning, and the impact those models can have on students.

Albrecht also shares what he has learned from other districts as he travels the state as a teacher ambassador. Our guests:

  • Christopher Albrecht, fourth grade teacher at the Fred W. Hill School in Brockport, and New York State’s Teacher of the Year
  • Jacob Gaskill, graduate of SUNY ESF, current Ph.D. candidate, and Christopher Albrecht’s former student

What can the U.S. education system learn from Finland? Perhaps the better question is, do students need school subjects? Teachers in Finland are gearing up for a significant shift in curricula for high school students. In 2020, curricula for students aged 16 and older will be rooted in phenomenon-based learning. That means instead of students taking math class, then science class, then English class, they will choose an event or phenomenon to study, incorporating multiple subjects in the process (something like exploring the climates of different countries, and reporting on them in French).

The model is getting some pushback, with critics saying it may lower standards and widen the gap between students who grasp concepts more quickly and those who need more direction. Could such a model be adopted in the U.S.?

Our guests weigh in on different forms of learning and the future of education. In studio:

  • Evvy Fanning, local high school English teacher
  • Douglas Allard, 7th grade social studies teacher in the Phelps Clifton Springs School District
  • Jennifer Wagner, RCSD educator and parent
  • Joanne Larson, professor of education and associate director of research at the Center for Urban Education Success at the University of Rochester's Warner School of Education

The New York State Board of Regents named its "Teacher of the Year," and the winner is from our area.

Christopher Albrecht is a fourth grade teacher in the Brockport Central School District. We talk to him about his career, and his thoughts on the future of education and the teaching profession.

Center for Teaching Vanderbilt University / Flickr

(AP) - The Cuomo administration is inviting teachers across New York to enter a competition to develop classroom projects and activities to commemorate the 100th anniversary of women securing the right to vote in the state. 

New York voters approved a woman's right to vote in November 1917, three years before the 19th amendment granted the same right to women nationally. 

"C.R.A.P" is not the most appealing name for a test, but it is memorable. C.R.A.P. stands for Currency, Reliability/Relevance, Authority, and Purpose/Point of View. With all the talk of fake news, you might think that the test is new, but it was created about a decade ago and now teachers and librarians nationwide are using it to help students identify reliable sources of information. 

Are we raising a generation that is better able to evaluate sources? Or are we in a permanent age of fake news? We answer those questions and learn about the test with our guests:

  • Sarah White, adjunct professor of English at MCC and The College at Brockport
  • Bob Berkman, business outreach librarian at the University of Rochester
  • Jocie Kopfman, teaches the "Rights and Responsibilities" class in The Commons at The Harley School
  • Lars Keulling, academic dean for The Harley School

Rochester City School Board president Van White has written a new children's book. It's called "Heroes," and it's about the everyday heroes in our lives: doctors, firefighters, caregivers. He joins us to talk about why he wrote the book and the importance of diversity and inclusion in literature.

From the Washington Redskins to the Cleveland Indians to so-called “pow-wows” at summer camps, elements of Native American history are being used for commercial gain, and many people don't realize it's offensive toward Native Americans. Is there a knowledge gap when it comes to Native American culture? How are schools teaching Native American history?

Our guests from Ganondagan say most schools need improvement when it comes to their lesson plans about Native American history, but there are a few schools doing admirable work. We talk about what they’d like to see in the classroom, and we hear local success stories. In studio:

  • Peter Jemison, historic site manager for Ganondagan
  • Michael Galban, curator and historian at the Seneca Art and Culture Center at Ganondagan
  • Katie McFarland, director of professional development for the Canandaigua City School District

If you were designing the school day from scratch, what would the day look like? What would the classroom look like? Education expert Sir Ken Robinson says the education paradigm must be changed. He argues schools are organized along factory lines --with ringing bells, separate facilities, and standardized curricula. He says this limits students’ creativity, their learning capacity, and their academic performance.

So how can we change how school days are modeled to maximize students’ potential? Our guests weigh in on everything from class sizes, spaces, testing, and when certain subjects should be taught. In studio:

  • Joanne Larson, professor of education and associate director of research at the Center for Urban Education Success at the University of Rochester’s Warner School of Education
  • Kevin Meuwissen, associate professor of teaching and curriculum, social studies education scholar, and director of teacher education for the University of Rochester’s Warner School of Education
  • Seth O’Bryan, Upper School math teacher and commons coordinator at The Harley School

When NPR tweeted the entire Declaration of Independence, a small but vocal set of Twitter users thoughts it was offensive. They didn't know what they were reading, and thought it was an anti-Trump screed.

So what are we teaching kids about the Declaration of Independence and American history? And why do immigrants fare so much better than American citizens on naturalization tests? We explore these questions with our guests:

  • Evvy Fanning, local high school English teacher
  • Samuel Bovard, 7th and 8th grade ESOL/ELA teacher in the Rochester City School District
  • Kevin Meuwissen, associate professor of teaching and curriculum, social studies education scholar, and director of teacher education for the Warner School of Education at the University of Rochester
  • Michael Oberg, distinguished professor of history at SUNY Geneseo

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