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rochester police department

Mutual trust isn’t always associated with relationships between the police and the community. But one new deputy chief in Rochester is on a mission to not only build mutual trust, but to also change the way residents view law enforcement. Newly appointed deputy chief of communications for the Rochester Police Department, La’Ron Singletary, tells you how he attempts to accomplish this on this edition of Need to Know.

City of Rochester

Mayor Lovely Warren and Rochester Police Chief Michael Ciminelli have announced some changes in the department’s command staff.

Effective in January, Captain La’Ron Singletary, who is currently Commanding Officer of the Administrative Services Division will  be promoted to Deputy Chief; Lt. Fabian Rivera will be promoted to Commander of RPD’s Special Operations division; and Lt. Elena Correia will be promoted to Commander of the Administrative Services division.

SASHA-ANN SIMONS/ WXXI NEWS

After his sister’s untimely death in 2003, Bing Reaves, Jr. helped protect the young sons she left behind.

“When I got the news I just felt hopeless. I wanted to be there for her, but I couldn’t,” Reaves said.

SASHA-ANN SIMONS/ WXXI NEWS

To get to the root of the problems between some Rochester residents and officers, the city plans to go straight to the sources.  

At a news conference Tuesday morning, Mayor Lovely Warren announced an initiative dubbed “90 Days of Community Engagement” that will begin in October. At her request, Rochester Police Chief Michael Ciminelli and the department’s deputy chief for community relations will spend the first 60 days gaining public input on how to further improve the relationship between officers and the community.  Officers are also expected to provide feedback with the same goal in mind.

A new program aims to increase the diversity in the Rochester Police Department, the Rochester Fire Department, and other areas related to public safety. We explore the Career Pathways to Public Safety program. Our guests:

  • Robert Poles, coordinator of the Career Pathways to Public Safety Program
  • Autumn Johnson, sponsored by AMR (former Rural Metro) to take EMT course at REOC
  • Kenan Haynes, works as a firefighter for RFD
  • Doug Vorndran, firefighter trainee
  • Deon Johnson, works as a security guard for City Security

A new theater program is helping local at-risk teenagers get back on a path to success. Shakespeare on the Streets matches students enrolled in Hillside's Reinvesting in Youth program with members of the Rochester Police Department, the Rochester Latino Theatre Company, and local Shakespeare artists.  

The student actors -- who have all had encounters with law enforcement -- will perform selections of Henry V on March 11 at 6:30 p.m. and March 12 at 3 p.m. at Wilson Foundation Academy. We talk to program organizers and to student participants, who explain how the play's themes have inspired them to work toward new beginnings. Our guests: 

In many ways, police work is more under the microscope than it has ever been. There are cameras everywhere. Citizens capture almost everything on cell phone video. Many officers welcome that; but still others say that it makes doing their jobs occasionally difficult, feeling that a single incident can be captured, without context, and cost a career.

We sit down with Rochester Police Chief Michael Ciminelli to discuss how his officers feel about the scrutiny, and how to continue building a strong relationship with the local community. Our guests:

  • Rochester Police Chief Michael Ciminelli
  • Rochester Police Captain Kevin Costello
  • Rochester Police Investigator Jackie Shuman

First hour: Police work in the age of cell phone cameras

Second hour: Upstate Revitalization Initiative

In many ways, police work is more under the microscope than it has ever been. There are cameras everywhere. Citizens capture almost everything on cell phone video. Many officers welcome that; but still others say that it makes doing their jobs occasionally difficult, feeling that a single incident can be captured, without context, and cost a career.

In our first hour, we'll sit down with Rochester Police Chief Michael Ciminelli to discuss how his officers feel about the scrutiny, and how to continue building a strong relationship with the local community. Our guests:

  • Rochester Police Chief Michael Ciminelli
  • Rochester Police Captain Kevin Costello
  • Rochester Police Investigator Jackie Shuman

In our second hour, the Rochester/Finger Lakes region was one of three regions to win the state's big economic development prize money. That means a total of $500 million is coming from the state, to be used in various ways. How, exactly, will it be spent? How should it be spent? What kinds of impacts should we look forward to? In studio, to answer those questions and more:

  • Joseph Morelle, New York State Assembly Majority Leader
  • Vincent Esposito, Empire State Development Finger Lakes Regional Director
  • Mark Peterson, Greater Rochester Enterprise President and CEO

RPD Says Viral Video Doesn't Tell the Whole Story

Oct 29, 2015
Michelle Faust

Rochester Police say they’re investigating an incident that resulted in a 15-second viral video of 5 officers taking down a man in the middle of Main Street. RPD’s initial findings are that the officers’ actions were in line with their training.

Rochester Police Chief Mike Ciminelli says every use of force by an officer is reviewed and this case is still being looked at.

According to the department’s initial analysis, the man subdued by police on Tuesday behaved in a violent and threatening manner.

We're going to cover a few topics in this hour. Why are gas prices so high in Rochester? Who signed up during open enrollment for the New York State Health Exchange? Why is Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver facing a federal investigation? When will Rochester present their police department redistricting plan?

Get ready for a fast-paced, informative hour.

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