WXXI AM News

Opioids

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So far this year, there were 462 reported drug overdoses in Monroe County; 68 of them were fatal.

A Rochester-based addiction recovery support group is expanding its efforts to respond to the ongoing opioid crisis.

Recovery Now NY is opening a new, monthly drop-in center in Irondequoit tonight where people struggling with substance abuse and their families can go to get learn about treatment and services.  It’s located at Glad Tidings Church at 1980 Culver Road.

The fact that rural, economically disadvantaged parts of the country broke heavily for the Republican candidate in the 2016 election is well known. But Medicare data indicate that voters in areas that went for Trump weren't just hurting economically — many of them were receiving prescriptions for opioid painkillers.

New York looks to expand access to medical marijuana

Jun 18, 2018

The New York State Health Department plans to make medical marijuana available to more New Yorkers.  Opioid use will be the newest addition to the list of qualifying conditions under the state’s medical marijuana program.

The health department characterized the decision as a step toward curbing the opioid epidemic, saying that medical marijuana treats the pain that opioids are meant to address while also reducing the chance of addiction and eliminating the risk of a fatal overdose.

Congressman Tom Reed declared his adamant opposition to the use of heroin injection sites recently.

The Southern Tier Republican says the proposal is made by “extremists on the left.”

"To me it’s just an extreme position that is dangerous to our communities given the nature of what we’re talking about, given the response and feedback I’ve heard from law enforcement officers, in regards to creating a culture attracting those that would push and distribute."

A New York State Assembly bill was submitted to allow cities to create their own heroin injection sites.

University of Rochester

A national conference held at the University of Rochester Saturday focused on battling the opioid crisis.

The Center for Leading Innovation and Collaboration or CLIC hosted the daylong session of meetings, to discuss how to best address opioid misuse and abuse through translational science.

But what is translational science?

Co-director of CLIC, Martin Zand explains.

What does it take to change the identity of a neighborhood? Residents of the Lyell Avenue neighborhood having been working to develop solutions to persistent challenges in the area, and now they want to share their work with the community. They will host a forum on June 1st, and it's open to the public. 

We hear from them, and from Monroe County Sheriff Baxter on what it takes to uplift a neighborhood. Our guests:

siena.edu

A new poll from Siena College shows that 90% of New Yorkers say the current opioid crisis is worse than previous public health crises.

An overwhelming majority of New Yorkers also supports strengthening prescription monitoring services; 82% say doctors should be punished for over prescribing.

But when it comes down to how the addiction started, Research Institute Director Don Levy says New Yorkers are divided on who is to blame.

Billboards with a warning to drug dealers

May 3, 2018
JVANBREDERODE@townofgates.org

Law enforcement and the private sector are teaming up to send a message to drug dealers:

If you deal drugs and someone dies, you're going to prison for homicide.

That's what it says on a billboard near High Falls that was unveiled this morning.

Gary Rogers, owner of Dock Hardware, paid for it.

He said one of his employees was personally affected by the opioid crisis.

siena.edu

  

The latest Siena College poll on opioids says 24% of New Yorkers were prescribed opioids in the last two years.

Don Levy, Research Institute Director at Siena College says in the third part of their polling series on the epidemic, they wanted to know what happens in the doctor’s office.

Alex Crichton

Treating opioid addiction as a crime isn't an adequate way to deal with this crisis.

That's according to the 16th Surgeon General of the United States, Dr. David Satcher, who returned today to the University of Rochester Medical School, where he completed his residency in 1972 and received an honorary degree in 1995.

He says treating the opioid epidemic like we treated the cocaine problem in the 1980s just won't work.

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