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Tianna Manon/WXXI News

Philanthropist and Paychex founder Tom Golisano announced on Thursday that he is pledging $5 million to support construction of a new pediatric Behavioral Health and Wellness Center at the University of Rochester.

Golisano, whose support also resulted in the Golisano Children’s Hospital being named after him, says the new pediatric facility will address gaps in care and accommodate more clinical staff to help reduce the number of children who are on a waiting list for services.

Karen DeWitt

The state comptroller has announced that New York is joining 28 other states in offering a program that will help parents with disabled children save money for their future.

The program is modeled on the college savings program, which also is operated by the comptroller’s office. It allows an account to be set up in the name of any New Yorker who is diagnosed with a disability before the age of 26.

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A new apartment complex in the town of Sweden is providing affordable homes for people with disabilities and low to moderate income individuals and families.

The 56-unit complex is co-owned by Lifetime Assistance and Rochester’s Cornerstone Group, a housing development and property management firm. 

Whitney MacIntyre, housing transition coordinator at Lifetime, says the new development is an inclusive environment where neighbors know neighbors and they can ask each other for help.

Caitlin Whyte / WXXI News

Despite the gray sky outside, inside the studio was quite cheerful.

The bright, colorful space housed three girls chatting about the weekend while glazing handmade bunnies.

Sarah Beren is a licensed creative art therapist and owns Spotted Rabbit, a studio with art classes, art therapy and an apprenticeship program for a population within the disability community she saw was underserved.

Rochester's new train station is open for business

Oct 6, 2017
Tianna Manon/WXXI News

Rochester’s new train station is turning heads. The brick and glass building replaces a smaller and temporary building local patrons were forced to use for over three decades.

And it marks the end of a three-year construction project which cost roughly $30 million. The station opened on Friday with a ribbon-cutting from Congresswoman Louise Slaughter, Governor Andrew Cuomo, Assembly Majority Leader Joe Morelle and Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren.

Julie Cataldo is strapped into a harness as she sits in her wheelchair just a few feet from the edge of the Erie Canal. A hydraulic lift hoists her from the chair and swings her out over the water.

The lift lowers her into a kayak, and its operator adjusts her seat.


Stephanie Woodward

Local disability rights advocates say they and others are starting to make progress in their efforts to change the national conversation around health care.

Over 20 Rochester-area residents were among the 101 people arrested for disrupting a Senate health care hearing in Washington on Monday.  It was the second time this year protesters saw Republican efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act fail.

marycariola.org

Mary Cariola Children's Center is hosting its annual fundraiser Sunday at Penfield’s Veterans Memorial Park.

The 11th year of the “Walking on Sunshine” fundraiser helps raise money for children with multiple complex disabilities.

CEO Karen Zandi says it’s a family event that funds the center’s school, residencies and community services; and is more social than exercise.

The organization supports youth with a range of disabilities including autism.

Parents of hundreds of children with special needs in New York State say their kids are not receiving the services they need. A recent report in the Democrat & Chronicle stated that in the 2016-2017 school year "nearly 400 3- and 4-year-olds in Monroe County were not evaluated for developmental delays within 60 days of their referral as required by law, according to local school district records.” The delay in referrals puts children at a developmental disadvantage, and at risk for needing costlier services in the future.

Local providers say the state’s reimbursement process is to blame: providers receive tardy and inadequate funding. Democrat & Chronicle reporter Justin Murphy explored this issue. He joins us in studio, and we’ll hear from local parents about the challenges they face. Our guests:

  • Justin Murphy, education reporter at the Democrat & Chronicle
  • Sharon Peck, parent
  • Pat Graff, director of special education at Rochester Childfirst Network
  • Cathy Rasmussen, director of York Wellness and Rehabilitation Institute, and associate dean of compliance and clinical affairs at the School of Health and Human Services at Nazareth College
  • Robin Hooper, early education director for the Rochester City School District

This conversation is part of WXXI’s Inclusion Desk, spotlighting issues related to disabilities. The WXXI Inclusion Desk is part of Move to Include, a partnership to encourage thoughtful discussion about issues of inclusion and the differently-abled.

Karen DeWitt / WXXI News

A Brockport School District teacher has been named the New York State Teacher of the Year.

The honor goes to Christopher Albrecht, a fourth-grade teacher at the Fred W. Hill School in Brockport, where he has taught for 20 years.  He has spent the last 14 years teaching fourth grade.

Brockport Schools Superintendent Lesli Myers says the district “couldn’t be prouder of his achievement,” and school principal Brandon Broughton says that Albrecht “is always accessible and takes great joy in celebrating his students’ successes with them.”

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