WXXI AM News

Inclusion Desk

The Inclusion Desk is a multi-platform reporting effort by WXXI News to inform and transform attitudes and behavior about inclusion. The Inclusion Desk grew from the Move to Include partnership between WXXI and the Golisano Foundation. Through programming and special events, WXXI and the Golisano Foundation look to build a more inclusive community by inspiring and motivating people to embrace different abilities and include all people in every aspect of community life.

SASHA-ANN SIMONS/WXXI

“There aren’t many accessible homes for people with disabilities. And when they are accessible, they’re usually too expensive or segregated,” says 24-year-old wheelchair user, Jensen Caraballo.

It’s been 25 years since the Americans with Disabilities Act established a mandate that five percent of all federally assisted housing developments must be accessible for persons with mobility disabilities.

Reporting in upstate New York from Innovation Trail reporters indicates that many New Yorkers living with disabilities still face challenges accessing services and difficult choices balancing quality of life and affordability.

(Videos after the jump)

Illusionist Adds Magic to Physical Therapy

Mar 19, 2015
spencersmagic.com

Kevin Spencer is an illusionist who has performed on stages across the world.

Following a serious car crash years ago, he woke from a coma and began a long, arduous process of physical therapy. Spencer was bored with the process and didn’t understand how it was helping him get better.

That’s when he developed the Healing of Magic program, which incorporates magic tricks into traditional occupational and physical therapy.

Click on the audio link above to hear Kevin Spencer describe how this works.

End the R word. Our panel talks about efforts to stamp out the flippant and hurtful usage of the term "retard" or its variant, "retarded." The discussion is part of our Move To Include initiative. 

Our panel:

It's called "Spread the Word to End the R-Word, " and it's a campaign to try and get people to stop using the word 'retarded'.  That campaign locally, organized by the Golisano Foundation is now in its fifth year and there are a number of activities over the next week to bring awareness to the issue and how the use of the word retarded is disparaging to people with intellectual disabilities.

Foundation director Ann Costello says this campaign really focuses on young people, so that the next generations will move away from using that word.

Nazareth College

It all began with one Gorbel employee, says President Brian Reh, who was going through physical therapy with her daughter.

"The idea came originally from one of our employees who had experienced first-hand how tough it was to go through gait rehabilitation with the current lack of technology. We had a lot of great things we were doing in the industrial technology sector, and she came forward and said, What if we could apply this to the health field?"

Veronica Volk / WXXI

Camp Puzzle Peace held a ceremonious ribbon-cutting ceremony for the opening of their Family Autism Center.

The 2300-square-foot facility on University Avenue provides room for play and education for families dealing with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Jen Hackett is the President of Camp Puzzle Peace. She says she's overwhelmed by the support of the community that made the center possible.

We wrap up our "Dialogue on Disability" with a conversation about employment access for all. With us to discuss: • Bill McDonald, executive director, Medical Motor Service • Dee Mascari, programs and services coordinator, National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Upstate New York Chapter• Ruth Redmond, NMSS Program Participant • Sara Taylor, director of employment, Rochester Rehabilitation

Our series of shows on Dialogue on Disability continues with a look at the importance of staying active after a brain injury. 

The Panel:

Paul Akers of Epilepsy-Pralid, Inc
Anita O'Brien of Rochester Rehabilitation

Pages