WXXI AM News

healthcare

How can doctors better communicate with their patients, especially when they need to discuss the prognosis of a serious illness? That's the subject of an upcoming lecture at the Rochester Academy of Medicine.

We preview that talk with our guests:

  • Dr. Ronald Epstein, M.D., professor of family medicine, psychiatry, and oncology at the University of Rochester Medical Center
  • Dr. Robert Horowitz, M.D., chief and professor of palliative care in the Department of Medicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center

Amazon, JPMorgan Chase, and Berkshire Hathaway are joining together to launch a new healthcare company. They may seem like strange bedfellows in the healthcare industry, but they think their partnership and ideas could help drive down the cost of care for their employees – about 950,000 people worldwide.

How will they do it? One option is offering telemedicine technology to providers. It’s a growing service that is already widely used in our area. So what will the future of healthcare look like – not only for the employees of these companies, but for all Americans? We talk about the impact of telemedicine and other innovative services, and how they could change the way you visit your doctor. Our guests:

  • Dr. Neil Herendeen, M.D., professor of pediatrics and pediatrician at Golisano Children's Hospital
  • Cynthia Gordon, director of telehealth services at Rochester Regional Health
  • Christopher Bell, executive director of the Monroe County Medical Society
  • Lois Irwin, president of EZaccessMD

What is going on with CHIP? The Children's Health Insurance Program has been widely discussed as a potential victim of budget cuts in Washington. What exactly is CHIP, and whom does it serve? What kind of impact should we expect if the program is cut?

The Washington Post and NPR have tried to lay out the particulars, dispel myths, and explain what kind of timeline the program is on. Meanwhile, celebrities like Jimmy Kimmel have taken up the cause, saying that millions of special-needs children are at risk.

We break it down with our guests:

  • Dr. Elizabeth Murray, assistant professor of pediatrics and pediatrician at Golisano Children's Hospital
  • Dr. Steve Cook, associate professor of pediatrics and pediatrician at Golisano Children's Hospital

What can hospitals learn from the airline industry? Pilot and author John Nance says they can improve their quality of care and reduce medical mistakes if they adapt safety measures designed for airlines. He joins us in studio to explain how it would work.

  • John Nance, author of Why Hospitals Should Fly, and a lawyer, pilot, veteran, and ABC News analyst
  • Amie Kulak, director of quality and education for Rochester Regional Healthcare Association
  • Nancy Tinsley, president of Rochester General Hospital

President Trump says that Americans should consider Obamacare dead and buried, but it's not. So what options do Americans have when it comes to the open enrollment period?

We discuss options and the current state of healthcare legislation. Our guests:

  • Jane Dodds, practice administrator for Women Gynecology and Childbirth Associates, and 30 year member of Medical Group Management Association
  • Leslie Moran, senior vice president for the New York Health Plan Association

What happens when doctors and nurses get overwhelmed? Every day, clinicians provide treatment for patients with life-threatening or life-limiting conditions. Being exposed to human suffering and having to face ethical challenges leaves many providers distressed, and sometimes, burned out. A Mayo Clinic study reported that in 2014, more than half of U.S. physicians experience at least one symptom of burnout, leading clinician burnout to be labeled as a public health crisis.

What does this mean for you when you visit the doctor or schedule a surgery? And what are the implications for the healthcare system as a whole? An upcoming presentation at the Rochester Academy of Medicine will explore clinician burnout, and offer strategies to prevent and mitigate it. We preview that presentation and answer your questions with our guests:

The number of people becoming part of the "sandwich generation" is growing. That's a group of parents responsible for raising children while caring for their aging parents. Conversations about death and dying are part of the aging process, and families often feel hesitant to have discussions about end-of-life wishes. An upcoming community-wide forum hopes to change that.

The Rochester Academy of Medicine is hosting the series, which includes sessions on end-of-life care, nursing home and hospice care, spiritual life, and palliative care. We discuss what options are appropriate. In studio:

  • Dr. Jeff Dmochowski, M.D., retired, chair of the program committee for retired physicians at the Rochester Academy of Medicine
  • Dr. Timothy E. Quill, M.D., professor of medicine, psychiatry, and medical humanities at the University of Rochester Medical Center

Stephanie Woodward was one of 20 Rochester-area disability rights activists arrested while protesting the Senate health care bill in Washington, D.C. last week. The group, called ADAPT, staged a “die-in” outside of Senator Mitch McConnell’s office.

Woodward is the director of advocacy for the Center for Disability Rights. She says the bill’s proposed cuts to Medicaid would be devastating to people with disabilities, and without it, people who now live independently would be forced into nursing homes.

Woodward joins us in studio to talk about her experience in Washington, and what she hopes to see with the health care bill.

Have you ever felt like your doctor had no time for you? Or that, when you finally had time with a doc, you felt rushed and unheard? Dr. Ron Epstein's new book aims to change all of that. It's called Attending: Medicine, Mindfulness, and Humanity. But what is mindfulness in a medical setting? Dr. Epstein says that the best doctors have it, and it allows them to connect with their patients in meaningful, human contexts. That's the difference between drumming through a routine, and listening long enough to realize that a shoulder pain might be something more sinister.

Dr. Epstein joins us to work through ways doctors can train themselves to be present, and connect with their patients -- raising the quality of care for everyone.

It's being called one of the most promising breakthroughs in medicine, and researchers say understanding it better could transform how we treat a number of diseases. We’re talking about the microbiome. Maybe you’ve heard the term used in various health-related discussions, but what does it really mean?

We discuss how the bacteria in our bodies help us digest food, fight off infection, and affect our mood.  Our guests:

  • Dr. Kirsi Jarvinen-Seppo, M.D., Ph.D., chief of pediatric allergy and immunology at Golisano Children's Hospital at Strong
  • Dr. Antti Seppo, Ph.D., research associate professor in pediatric allergy/immunology at the University of Rochester Medical Center
  • Dr. Helena Boersma, Ed.D., executive clinical director at the Ranch at Bethel

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