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New plan in Greece to deal with potential flooding

Feb 6, 2018
Town of Greece

Greece Town Supervisor Bill Reilich has a plan to ward off potential floodwaters this year.

He has commissioned the installation of new shut-off valves and piping, and the construction of berm in locations greatly impacted by high lake levels last year.

Reilich says research indicates that shut-off valves and new piping will be more effective than running pumps 24 hours a day like last year.

Alex Crichton / WXXI News

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is calling for a federal agency to take emergency action to help residents along the Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence River shorelines deal with flooding problems.

Cuomo has written to a regional official with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, following up on the historic flooding that damaged homes and businesses along Lake Ontario and the Saint Lawrence River last year.

Veronica Volk / WXXI News

Water levels on Lake Ontario are well below the record peak they hit last May, but they are relatively high for this time of year. That’s according to the International Lake Ontario - St. Lawrence River Board which can help regulate the lake level to some extent via the Moses Saunders dam.

As of January 30th, Lake Ontario was a foot above average.

Arun Heer is U.S. Secretary for the board. He says the board continues to maximize the outflow of water from Lake Ontario.

Veronica Volk / Great Lakes Today/WXXI News

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — New York's U.S. senators want the Army Corps of Engineers to fund a new study of what needs to be done to prevent future flood devastation along Lake Ontario.

Democratic Sens. Chuck Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand say the Great Lakes Coast Resiliency Study will develop an infrastructure strategy for future coastal management.

The Corps created such a plan for making the Atlantic shoreline more resilient in the wake of Superstorm Sandy.

Office of the Monroe County Executive

New York State will double available funding for homeowners impacted by shoreline flooding along Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River last year.

Governor Andrew Cuomo says that he is doubling available funding for those homeowners and increasing the state’s commitment from $15 million to $30 million.

The governor also says he previously advanced $5 million in funding that was approved by the state legislature this week, bringing the state’s total commitment to $50 million. Cuomo also says he will continue to work with lawmakers to secure additional state aid.

This has to be one of the most Zen-like videos of the year: a snowy owl riding the icy waves of Lake Ontario. Now, it's a hit on social media. 

Over the past two winters, there wasn’t much ice cover on the Great Lakes. That changed with this month’s deep freeze.


A new year brings new opportunities for recreation and commercial interests along the Great Lakes. It also means seven gubernatorial elections in states that border the lakes, and growing concern over climate change.

Great Lakes Today asked environmental groups and others for their thoughts on 2017 -- and what’s to come in the new year. One issue stood out: the wide gap between regional interests and the Trump administration. 

The past year was loaded with turmoil for the Great Lakes. A new president tried to cut $300 million in  restoration projects. Homes were flooded along Lake Ontario. And one of the scariest invasive species -- the Asian carp -- was found less than 10 miles from Lake Michigan.

Here's a look at some of the biggest stories that Great Lakes Today brought you -- from New York to Minnesota, as well as the provinces of Quebec and Ontario. 

The Great Lakes/St. Lawrence River make up the world's biggest freshwater system -- and an enormously valuable resource. It supplies drinking water for millions of residents and powers the region's economy.

Last year, 42 million gallons were withdrawn from the basin each day, according to a new report from the Great Lakes Commission. Here's where it went.

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