WXXI AM News

environment

Veronica Volk / WXXI News/Great Lakes Today

Spring flooding along Lake Ontario is damaging many homes along the shoreline, and it’s hurting people who have businesses there. Now, business owners say it will take a long time to recover -- even after the floodwaters go away.

Marge’s is a little bungalow bar in Rochester. Inside, there's a small wooden bar and a few games, but you don't go to Marge’s to stay inside.

Out back is a big stretch of beach looking out over Lake Ontario. There's a tiki hut, and frozen drink machine, and live music on the weekends.

You may have heard the phrase "zero waste" being used a lot lately. What does it actually mean? A few local entities are taking on this sustainability initiative, including CMAC and the Brighton School District. Brighton hopes to be the first district in Monroe County to recycle most of its waste. The initial goal is to divert 80 percent of the district's waste from landfills, and reach 90 percent landfill diversion in three years. Our guests explain what it means to go zero waste in 2017.

  • Cassidy Putney of Impact Earth, a company based in Rochester that helps organizations reduce waste and become more sustainable
  • Dr. Kevin McGowan, superintendent of the Brighton Central School District
  • Lynn Freida from CMAC

Steve Curwood is the host and executive producer of Living on Earth. His pilot of the show aired in the 1990, and now, 27 years later, he says the majority of the climate issues that he addressed on that first program -- the state of the oceans, energy choices, environmental justice -- have become more significant problems. Curwood says the only issue that has improved is the public understanding of climate change. 

This hour, Curwood joins us for a conversation about social equity, climate resilience, and green development in Rochester. Our guests:

The Rochester Regional Group is bringing the first African-American president of the Sierra Club to Rochester for its annual Environmental Forum. Aaron Mair is committed to not just environmental activism, but social justice as it relates to our environment.

We discuss his mission and his work. Our guests:

Two North Country bald eagles die of lead poisoning

Apr 19, 2017
Trish Marki, used with permission

Two bald eagles died in the North Country this spring after being poisoned with lead. That’s according to a wildlife rehabilitation group in the Lake George area.

This comes at a time when there’s a fierce debate over sportsmen’s use of lead ammunition and lead fishing tackle.

What might we expect regarding environmental and climate issues under the Trump administration? We discuss the President-elect's appointments for Secretary of State and head of the EPA, their views on climate science, and more. Our guests:

  • Lawrence Torcello, associate professor in the Department of Philosophy at RIT
  • Karen Berger, lecturer in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of Rochester

The Finger Lakes Land Trust has priorities for the Finger Lakes region. We discuss the organization's regional conservation agenda.  Our guests:

  • Andrew Zepp, executive director of the Finger Lakes Land Trust
  • Lisa Cleckner, director of the Finger Lakes Institute
  • Marti Macinski, board member for the Finger Lakes Land Trust, and owner of Standing Stone Vineyards

RIT has received a federal grant to research sustainable solutions for minimizing and managing the growing and complex challenges of food waste.

The $1 million National Science Foundation grant was awarded to Callie Babbitt, an associate professor at the Golisano Institute for Sustainability.

Opponents Urge Cuomo to Say No to Pipeline Expansion

Sep 21, 2016
Karen DeWitt

Opponents of a pipeline expansion that would flow through vast portions of New York want the Cuomo administration to deny a key permit, an act that could halt the upgrade. 

The New Market Dominion pipeline is one of a dizzying array of fuel pipelines that flow through New York, in many cases taking natural gas from hydrofracking sites in other states to markets in New York and other places.

A Penfield resident decided she had seen enough cookie-cutter subdivisions springing up, and she stepped in to make sure 18 acres of green space wouldn't become another. Mindy MacLaren bought the land across from Rothfuss Park, and soon it will be turned over to the Genesee Land Trust. What will they do with it? Should we be more concerned about preserving natural spaces?

This nature preserve will be named for Irene Gossin, the first woman elected to an executive political office in Monroe County history, and one of the first prominent local environmentalists. Gossin is 97, and we talk to her about the honor, and her history of environmental advocacy. Our guests:

  • Mindy MacLaren, Penfield resident
  • Gay Mills, executive director of The Genesee Land Trust
  • Kate McArdle, current leader of the Penfield Democratic Committee

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