WXXI AM News

education

The Rochester School Board recently passed a nearly $900 million budget. District spending has a few critics among Rochester’s mayoral candidates who are calling for more accountability and transparency. One person who has spent much time dissecting what’s working and what’s not in city schools is Board President Van White. He joins this edition of Need to Know to talk mayor-school district partnership, the current state of the city school system and more.

On this edition of Need to Know we continue our Top of the Class series. The series introduces viewers to high school students in the Greater Rochester community not only working hard in the classroom, but also trying to make our community and our world a better place. Joining Need to Know host Hélène Biandudi Hofer for this segment is Eman Muthana. The World of Inquiry High School student is a runner-up for the 2017 Princeton Prize in Race Relations – Rochester. Muthana is recognized by World of Inquiry staff and students for having a significant positive effect on race relations in her school and the larger community.

Candidates in the race for Rochester mayor are painting a picture of what city schools might look like under their administration. Now that we’ve heard some of their plans, we hear from the School Board President. On this edition of Need to Know, Van White weighs in on their proposals, the Superintendent and his vision for what’s next in city schools.

Also on the show, our relatively warm forecast this week doesn’t change the fact that Lake Ontario remains at record high levels. Great Lakes reporter/producer Veronica Volk shares the stories of those impacted, mounting fears and next steps.

And we’ll meet a Rochester high school student utilizing her own life experiences for the sake of racial tolerance and understanding. She’s the latest to join WXXI’s “Top of the Class” series on Need to Know.

Area lawmakers gathered at the Gates Chili High School field house Thursday to announce $200,000 in state funds to help expand Unified Champion Schools.

That's a program that brings together students with and without intellectual disabilities through education, sports and youth leadership.

It promotes inclusion through shared sport training and competition experiences.

Neal Johnson is the president and CEO of Special Olympics-New York.   He says this program can help battle issues like bullying and harassment.

Dating violence is a widespread issue, and many teens who are victims of violence in relationships do not report their experiences out of fear. According to a 2011 survey conducted by the CDC, "23 percent of females and 14 percent of males who ever experienced rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner, first experienced some form of partner violence between 11 and 17 years of age."

We'll discuss teen dating abuse and new initiatives that address barriers faced by survivors. Willow Domestic Violence Center is leading the way with local initiatives. It's opening a new state-of-the-art facility that includes an expanded emergency shelter, an expanded counseling center, and an onsite pet shelter.

Our guests:

You may have heard the phrase "zero waste" being used a lot lately. What does it actually mean? A few local entities are taking on this sustainability initiative, including CMAC and the Brighton School District. Brighton hopes to be the first district in Monroe County to recycle most of its waste. The initial goal is to divert 80 percent of the district's waste from landfills, and reach 90 percent landfill diversion in three years. Our guests explain what it means to go zero waste in 2017.

  • Cassidy Putney of Impact Earth, a company based in Rochester that helps organizations reduce waste and become more sustainable
  • Dr. Kevin McGowan, superintendent of the Brighton Central School District
  • Lynn Freida from CMAC

Nearly all  area school district budgets passed in Tuesday’s voting.

But in Pittsford, not enough people favored the budget to meet the 60 percent threshold needed for a ‘super majority’ since the district wanted to exceed the state tax cap.

The vote was 3,687 people in favor of the budget, 3,207 against.

Among the reasons district officials wanted to exceed the tax cap was to pay for full-day kindergarten in Pittsford, which many districts across the state now offer.

Voters in New York State will get a chance to vote on their local school budgets on Tuesday. The vast majority are keeping their spending requests within the mandatory tax cap,

The property tax cap is now in its sixth year, and according to the New York State School Boards’ David Albert, most of the state’s nearly 700 school districts are asking for increases that are within the limits of the cap.

NPR

School districts across the state are holding votes on their budgets Tuesday. While almost all of them are keeping their spending requests within the mandatory tax cap, some districts wonder whether the cap is sustainable over the long term. 

The property tax cap is now in its sixth year, and according to David Albert with the New York State School Boards, most of the state’s nearly 700 school districts are asking for increases that are within the limits of the cap.

Last fall, the American Academy of Pediatrics issued new recommendations for limiting media use among children. How can parents work under these guidelines and help their kids unplug and reconnect to non-digital activities?

A book called The Game is Playing Your Kid offers advice for monitoring and limiting screen time for children. The author, Dr. Joe Dilley, is in Rochester as a guest of the Norman Howard School. He joins us in studio to talk about how parents can help kids transition from overuse to more mindful use of technology. He's joined by Dr. Elizabeth Murray, assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics at Golisano Children's Hospital.

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