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Capitol Bureau

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is due to release his budget Tuesday. Revenues are down, and the repeal of the Affordable Care Act could cost the state billions of dollars.

So what should residents expect?

We already know that Cuomo wants to spend more money on schools this year; he said so several times in his six State of the State speeches. 

“We will increase funding for education to a new record level, all-time high all across the state,” Cuomo promised in New York City on Jan. 9.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is due to release his budget on Tuesday, and agencies that work with those with intellectual disabilities are among those hoping for more funds. They say they need help to pay workers the new higher minimum wage.

New York’s minimum wage is going up over the next few years, to $15 eventually in New York City and lesser amounts upstate. Groups that provide services for the developmentally disabled rely on Medicaid reimbursements to pay their workers, and they say they’ll have a hard time meeting the higher wages without more money from the state.

Governor Cuomo's office

Gov. Andrew Cuomo has ended his six-city State of the State tour, speaking for nine hours total, according to his estimates, and traveling over 1,200 miles — with one emergency helicopter landing thrown in for good measure.

But the departure from the traditional speech before lawmakers at the Capitol has its advantages and its drawbacks.

The governor began the multi-day rollout of his agenda right after the winter holidays during an appearance with Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, who is still popular among New Yorkers on the left after his presidential campaign.

Karen DeWitt

Gov. Andrew Cuomo saved his ethics proposals for the last stop of his State of the State tour in Albany, where he released a 10-point plan to address rampant corruption that has reached his own administration.

Governor Cuomo's office

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is pushing a plan that he says could cut property taxes in New York — by requiring county leaders to develop a cost-cutting plan and letting voters decide whether it’s a good idea.

As governor, Cuomo does not directly control local property taxes. But he wants to require county executives to do something about the state’s rates, which are highest in the nation. Under his plan, the county leaders would develop cost-cutting blueprints and put them on the ballot so voters could decide whether they want the reductions or not.

Governor Cuomo's office

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is proposing that New York state allow ride-sharing services like Uber and Lyft. 

The ride-sharing services have been trying unsuccessfully to expand to areas outside of New York City. Upstate and parts of Long Island are among the last places in the country not to have access to companies like Uber and Lyft.

Cuomo, in a State of the State speech in Buffalo, said that it’s time that changed, calling it an “unfair duality.”

“If it makes sense for downstate, it makes sense for upstate,” Cuomo said.

Matt Ryan New York Now

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is doing something different with the State of the State this year. Instead of delivering a speech in Albany to lawmakers who will have to approve his proposals, he’s giving six mini speeches in three days all around the state. Legislative leaders will not be attending.

For nearly a century, the State of the State was held in early January, with traditions including a cordial reception at the governor’s mansion and a lavish brunch by the Assembly speaker.

The new year for the state Legislature has begun in discord, with an absent governor and Republicans in the Senate vowing to take a harder line against Democrat Andrew Cuomo. 

The year began without Cuomo, who abandoned the tradition of conducting a State of the State speech on the first day of the session in favor of giving a presentation on airport renovations to a group of business leaders in New York City. He’ll do speeches across the state later. 

Matt Ryan New York Now

An ethics reform proposal quietly circulated between Gov. Andrew Cuomo and legislative leaders for a possible special session that also could include a pay raise is getting blasted by the state’s attorney general as possibly unconstitutional.

Cuomo has been talking about reforming economic development contract awards in his administration, following federal criminal charges against nine people — one a former top aide — on bribery and bid-rigging charges in connection with the Buffalo Billion and other projects.

Advocates for the homeless say the governor and Legislature don’t need to call a special session to free up more money to help create more housing for those in need. They say political leaders could simply sign an already printed memorandum of understanding  and start helping people now.

Kevin O’Connor, director of Joseph’s House in Troy, read the names of homeless clients who have passed away in the past year – people he said died too young.

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