WXXI AM News

American Graduate

American Graduate...

Parents of hundreds of children with special needs in New York State say their kids are not receiving the services they need. A recent report in the Democrat & Chronicle stated that in the 2016-2017 school year "nearly 400 3- and 4-year-olds in Monroe County were not evaluated for developmental delays within 60 days of their referral as required by law, according to local school district records.” The delay in referrals puts children at a developmental disadvantage, and at risk for needing costlier services in the future.

Local providers say the state’s reimbursement process is to blame: providers receive tardy and inadequate funding. Democrat & Chronicle reporter Justin Murphy explored this issue. He joins us in studio, and we’ll hear from local parents about the challenges they face. Our guests:

  • Justin Murphy, education reporter at the Democrat & Chronicle
  • Sharon Peck, parent
  • Pat Graff, director of special education at Rochester Childfirst Network
  • Cathy Rasmussen, director of York Wellness and Rehabilitation Institute, and associate dean of compliance and clinical affairs at the School of Health and Human Services at Nazareth College
  • Robin Hooper, early education director for the Rochester City School District

This conversation is part of WXXI’s Inclusion Desk, spotlighting issues related to disabilities. The WXXI Inclusion Desk is part of Move to Include, a partnership to encourage thoughtful discussion about issues of inclusion and the differently-abled.

Karen DeWitt / WXXI News

A Brockport School District teacher has been named the New York State Teacher of the Year.

The honor goes to Christopher Albrecht, a fourth-grade teacher at the Fred W. Hill School in Brockport, where he has taught for 20 years.  He has spent the last 14 years teaching fourth grade.

Brockport Schools Superintendent Lesli Myers says the district “couldn’t be prouder of his achievement,” and school principal Brandon Broughton says that Albrecht “is always accessible and takes great joy in celebrating his students’ successes with them.”

WXXI

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York education leaders have tweaked and renamed the Common Core learning standards in response to criticism over the way they were written and implemented.

A Board of Regents committee on Monday approved the reworked Next Generation Learning Standards for English and math, with plans to fully implement them with the start of the 2020-21 school year. Education Commissioner MaryEllen Elia says that will give teachers and students time to adjust before the standards become the basis for statewide testing.

freeimages.com/Flavio Takemoto

The organization representing more than 600 public school boards across the state says how science is taught in the classroom will influence how a generation of students think about climate change.

Starting this fall, new standards for teaching science go into effect in New York.  They put a much more specific emphasis on the role of human activity in global warming.

Click on the LISTEN link above to hear an interview with Dave Albert, spokesman for the New York State School Boards Association.

RCSD's Attendance Blitz focuses on chronic absentees

Aug 24, 2017

Rochester City School District teachers and staff went door-to-door Thursday, visiting roughly 200 students who missed more than 10 percent of school last year.

The goal of this "attendance blitz", said Superintendent Barbara Deane-Williams, is to encourage a strong start to the new year and to also better understand the challenges students may face getting to school.

Caitlin Whyte / WXXI News

Congresswoman Louise Slaughter toured the site of a local YouthBuild project Wednesday.

The home building project helps at-risk youth successfully transition from school to the workforce while rebuilding their communities, helping participants work toward a high school diploma or GED while gaining experience in the construction industry.

Congresswoman Slaughter said everything about this project is positive.

Test Scores Inch Up

Aug 22, 2017

The results of this year’s Common Core-related standardized tests show scores for New York’s schoolchildren inching up. About one-fifth of the children boycotted the tests altogether because of continued controversy over the Common Core learning standards.

WXXI

The State Education Department has released results of Spring testing for grades 3–8  for English Language Arts and math.

The state says that overall, for ELA, the percentage of students in grades 3–8 who scored at the proficient level increased by 1.9 percentage points to 39.8.

In math, the percentage of students at the proficient level increased to 40.2, up 1.1 percent over last year.

The Rochester City School District is conducting a week long leadership summit consisting of national speakers, educational seminars and personal introspection.           

The five-day summit will focus on following the District’s priority areas: educational equity, relational capacity, innovation, accountability and coherence.

Only five school districts in New York State do not have full day kindergarten. Pittsford remains one of those districts, despite the efforts of teachers and administrators to convince voters. Brighton recently moved to adopt full day kindergarten.

Our guests discuss their views and educating young children:

  • Mike Pero, superintendent of the Pittsford Central School District
  • Kevin McGowan, superintendent of the Brighton Central School District

Pages