WXXI AM News
Karen DeWitt

The New York State Assembly and Senate adjourned for the year Wednesday evening, without any deals on extending control of the New York City Mayor’s authority over the public school system, or the continuation of sales taxes in Upstate and Long Island counties. 

Assembly Democrats tied the two issues together in one bill, and Assembly Majority Leader Joe Morelle late Wednesday afternoon said they didn't have any intention of unlinking the two items. 

The Irondequoit Town Board has voted to authorize Monroe County to move ahead with created reduced speed limit zones near the West Irondequoit campus on Cooper Road and Eastridge High School on East Ridge Road.

For a quarter-mile stretch on each road, the speed limit will be reduced to 25 miles-per-hour on school days, between the hours of 7:00-9:00 am and 2:00-4:00 p.m.

WXXI photo

Lyft is the first ride-hailing service to sign an agreement with Monroe County to allow it to operate out of the Greater Rochester International Airport when the ride-hailing operations begin in upstate New York June 29th.

Starting that day, passengers arriving here can be picked up at a designated area in front of the baggage claim area.

County Executive Cheryl Dinolfo says it’s important that Monroe County have the same kind of services that many other communities have.

Matt Ryan New York Now

The New York State Assembly and Senate were preparing to adjourn for the year Wednesday afternoon, without any deals on extending control of the New York City Mayor’s authority over the public school system, or the continuation of sales taxes in Upstate and Long Island counties.

Assembly Democrats have tied the two issues together in one bill, and Assembly Majority Leader Joe Morelle says they don’t have any intention of delinking the two items.

Karen Shakerdge/WXXI

One day when Amy Plouffe was at work, she felt a sharp pain on the left side of her body.

“The side of my rib cage down to my hip and my leg was very, very sore. It felt like I pulled a muscle or something,” Plouffe said from her home in Bloomfield, New York.

Her doctor gave her a prescription to treat a pulled nerve, but it didn’t help. And then, a couple of days later, she felt something in her right breast.

Super Bowl Champion and Rochester native Roland Williams says he’s seen the effects poverty, gangs, drugs, and violence can have on teens living in poverty, and he’s made it his mission to set local students on a path to success. That’s why he founded the Champion Academy, which offers “extreme mentoring” to students in middle and high school.

We get an inside look at how the Academy works from leaders and participants, and we hear Williams’ vision for its future. Our guests:

  • Roland Williams, former NFL player and founder of the Champion Academy
  • Anthony Bogar, member of the Champion Academy
  • Titiana Bogar, Anthony’s mother
  • Veronica Wilson, community partnerships manager for the Champion Academy

A recent production of "Julius Caesar" at New York City’s Shakespeare in the Park has caused uproar within right-wing circles. Some conservatives say the Caesar character -- who is styled after President Trump and assassinated -- normalizes political violence against the right. But do these critics miss the point of the play? The work has long been used as a vehicle for political commentary, and Shakespeare scholars cite its role as a cautionary tale of the dangers of political assassination.

Our guests discuss what the play really means, how it’s taught (if it is taught) in schools, and the role of farce in theater. In studio:

  • Diana Louise Carter, producer for WallByrd Theatre Co.'s summer production of Macbeth, and publicist for the Rochester Shakespeare Players' summer production of As You Like It
  • Evvy Fanning, local high school English teacher
  • Jacob Baller, senior at Webster Thomas High School
  • Sheila Byrne, Advanced Placement English teacher at Webster Thomas High School who prepares students for the Rochester Shakespeare Competition

NYS  officials say that they’ve reached a potential settlement with Charter Communications regarding the build-out of its cable network.

The State Department of Public Service announced the $13 million settlement, saying that Charter failed to meet requirements for expanding the cable network as called for when the state approved Charter’s acquisition of Time Warner Cable.

For Barack Obama it’s playing basketball and pool. For Congresswoman Frederica Wilson it’s collecting hats. For George W. Bush it’s painting. These are some of the hobbies of political leaders in our nation that give us just a little insight into the person behind the politician. But what about our local political figures in Rochester? It can be rare to get a behind-the-scenes look of their lives….until now. A special segment on Need to Know this summer will take us inside the lives of candidates in the race for Rochester mayor. The focus: getting to know them through one of their favorite pastimes. First up, Democrat Rachel Barnhart.

Why is it that so often when we meet someone for the first time we ask, “What do you do?” Do our jobs really define us? What more can we learn about someone when we look beyond how they earn a paycheck?

These questions and more are the inspiration documentary play written and performed by two Spencerport natives. Kate Marple and Melissa Bergstrom’s “Big Work” examines our modern day relationship to our jobs and the ripple effect this has on our lives.

Kate and Melissa are co-founders of Perpetual Visitors Theater Company in Boston.

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