WXXI AM News

Need to Know

Thursdays at 8:00 p.m. & Sundays at 11:00 a.m. on WXXI-TV & on City 12

He says he’s one of us and he’s the American dream. Monroe county legislator Tony Micciche joins the program to talk taxes, jobs, education and what it will take become the first Republican mayor in more than 40 years in the city of Rochester. Our conversation with this year’s mayoral candidates continues on Need to Know.

It’s been said that history has a way of repeating itself. The global refugee crisis of more than 65 million displaced people draws a correlation to one of the darkest times in human history. Today the world is experiencing the worst humanitarian crisis since World War II.

As some nations open their borders to refugees escaping conflicts in their homelands, closer to home we remember our past when nearly a thousand refugees from Europe arrived in Oswego, New York in 1944.

For Keturah Ariel, making art that inspires, uplifts and advocates for her community is a priority. When the artist had a hard time finding paintings and drawings of girls that reflected her - young women of color - she began creating the images herself. The result: a business for her passion that empowers young girls.

On this edition of Need to Know, we’ll learn about Ariel’s story from PBS affiliate WOSU. We’ll also talk with Rochester artist Johnnie Lee Smith who says African American and Hispanic youth not only need to see images of themselves reflected in art, but also need to see artists who look like them. 

When kids lash out or negatively act and speak out in the classroom there are repercussions. There’s detention, suspension, expulsion and sometimes legal ramifications. But what’s the story behind their behavior? And what would the response be if we knew, that for some, their actions are directly connected to the violence they’ve witnessed or endured and the long-term damage that violence has caused such as trauma? According to a survey done by the Department of Justice, 58 percent of kids have experienced or witnessed violence. On this edition of Need to Know we hear about a local effort to mitigate the impact of this public health crisis.

You may have heard a relatively unfamiliar name now in the race for Rochester’s next mayor. It’s Lori Thomas. The former teacher says she’s not a party politician, but a public servant who, if elected, will make the city prosperous. And, like some of her competitors in this race, she’s got a plan. A plan for turning vacant lots into homes for veterans. A plan for empowering the lives of seniors. And a plan for improving the lives of city youth. We hear from Lori Thomas on this edition of Need to Know.

What a “no party” candidate says she can bring to the City of Rochester so power returns to the people. But how? Mayoral candidate Lori Thomas joins this edition of Need to Know to explain.

Also on the show, more than half of kids in the US have been exposed to violence. The ripple effect of that exposure is damaging in more ways than one. We’ll hear about a local effort trying to mitigate the impact in Rochester.

And artists explain what it really means when you see your own cultural identity reflected in a painting...and in the painter.

From a “tiny homes” project for veterans to emergency centers within the four quadrants of the City of Rochester – the latest candidate to join the race for mayor is promising revitalization if elected. We’ll hear from retired teacher and education advocate Lori Thomas on her 6-step plan.

Walt Disney. Women of the Maassia tribe. Models. Children. Landscapes. There seems to be no shortage of people, moments, and memories captured by legendary Kodak photographer Neil Montanus. The man whose images have been seen and celebrated by millions around the world is now celebrating a rebirth of sorts in his career….at age 90. Just before his special exhibition, Neil Montanus joins this edition of Need to Know with his son Jim Montanus – a fellow photographer and owner of Montanus Gallery.

There’s a movement taking place across the country and it’s spreading throughout the world. It’s an EcoDistrict movement. This may be a little known term for many, but if it’s successful in Rochester, the local effort could serve as a model throughout our region and the state. But what is an EcoDistrict, why do we need it and how can it really regenerate urban areas such as Rochester?

If they’re successful they can create jobs, serve as an answer to unmet needs in the market and bring about social change. In cities, they’re also a key factor for growth both in population and income. So what’s happening now in the City of Rochester to make the landscape appealing for urban entrepreneurs and is it working? In this Need to Know segment we’ll hear from Ebony Miller Wesley, Interim Director of RIT’s Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Heidi Zimmer-Meyer, President of Rochester Downtown Development Corporation (The Commissary).

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