WXXI AM News

Need to Know

Thursdays at 8:00 p.m. & Sundays at 11:00 a.m. on WXXI-TV & on City 12

There’s a question that has plagued the Rochester community for decades: What will it take to improve educational outcomes for city school students? On this edition of Need to Know we’ll learn how one thing, equity, could change everything.

Also on the show, they’ve escaped war, violence, persecution and natural disasters. And some who now call Rochester “home” are still living with uncertainty. We’ll learn why World Refugee Day has a new meaning.

And meet a local valedictorian with a heart for others and a mean forehand as our Top of the Class series continues.

Renowned sociologist, professor and education commentator Pedro Noguera is in Rochester to explain what it takes to bring equity and excellence to schools. He’ll join East High School Superintendent Shaun Nelms in our studio for this timely conversation on Need to Know.

Need to Know airs Thursday night at 8 p.m. on WXXI-TV.

Artist Laural Hartman recently invited WXXI into her studio. As we know with art, there’s generally a deeper meaning behind a painting, drawing or sculpture. With Hartman’s work, we’re awakened to a life experience with several layers - some of which resonate with many of us and others we’ve never encountered until now.

Hartman, also a faculty member at RIT’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf joins Tabitha Jacques, Director of the Joseph F. and Helen C. Dyer Arts Center at RIT to explain what mainstream museums may not understand about the specialty of deaf art.

While the American Health Care Act is being considered by Congress, local disability rights advocates are taking action. They’re calling on President Trump to support the Disability Integration Act (DIA). They’re also calling for people with disabilities to have a voice in the health care reform debate. One of those advocates who recently traveled to Washington is Ericka Jones of the Center for Disability Rights.

Jones joined a demonstration outside the White House which led to more than 80 arrests according to the disability rights group ADAPT. She explains the potential impact of the DIA on all sectors of the community.

School districts throughout Rochester are battling a storm of unknowns. The federal health care bill which is a repeal of the Affordable Care Act is calling for $880 billion in cuts to Medicaid over the next ten years. Why does that matter to public school districts? It ultimately affects services delivered to some of their most vulnerable students - those in special education.

Susan Hetherington – director of the Strong Center for Developmental Disabilities at the University of Rochester - explains some of the potential implications of the health care bill for students.

This story is from WXXI's  Inclusion Desk, part of our Move to Include partnership between WXXI and the Golisano Foundation designed to promote inclusion for people with intellectual and physical disabilities.

The repeal of the Affordable Care Act could have some unintended consequences on the most vulnerable: children with disabilities. On this special Move to Include edition of Need to Know we’ll learn how special education in our public schools may see unbearable funding cuts.

Also on the show, some local disability rights advocates were recently detained outside the White House. We’ll discuss what they’re calling on President Trump to do and if he’s responded.

And a complex journey for a local artist unfolds on canvas. How local talent is awakening our understanding of deaf culture through art.

Move to Include and the Inclusion Desk is a partnership between WXXI and the Golisano Foundation designed to promote inclusion for people with intellectual and physical disabilities.

There are several unanswered questions about the repeal of the Affordable Care Act - including what it means for special education students. As the new health bill stands right now - it would cut assistance to children in special ed. We’ll break down the potential changes.

Plus, you'll experience a world unfamiliar to many through the lens of deaf artists. Learn how local talent is awakening our understanding of their lives through their work.

The Rochester School Board recently passed a nearly $900 million budget. District spending has a few critics among Rochester’s mayoral candidates who are calling for more accountability and transparency. One person who has spent much time dissecting what’s working and what’s not in city schools is Board President Van White. He joins this edition of Need to Know to talk mayor-school district partnership, the current state of the city school system and more.

On this edition of Need to Know we continue our Top of the Class series. The series introduces viewers to high school students in the Greater Rochester community not only working hard in the classroom, but also trying to make our community and our world a better place. Joining Need to Know host Hélène Biandudi Hofer for this segment is Eman Muthana. The World of Inquiry High School student is a runner-up for the 2017 Princeton Prize in Race Relations – Rochester. Muthana is recognized by World of Inquiry staff and students for having a significant positive effect on race relations in her school and the larger community.

Historically high water levels are still afflicting the shores of Lake Ontario. And change likely won’t come until early June - that’s when lake levels are expected to crest. The flooding has affected hundreds of properties since March. Veronica Volk is the Great Lakes Today reporter and producer for WXXI News. She has been tracking this story for the past two months and she joins this edition of Need to Know to explain what’s going on and what’s to come.

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