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Connections

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Evan Dawson talks about what matters to you on ConnectionsEvery weekday from Noon-2 p.m. Be part of the program with questions or comments by phone - 1-844-295-TALK (8255), email, Facebook or Twitter

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Super Bowl champion Roland Williams spoke with WXXI's Evan Dawson following the NFL's new national anthem policy. The league voted in the new policy on Wednesday; it states that if players kneel on the field or sidelines, their teams will be fined, but players are allowed to remain in the locker room while the anthem is played.

Williams shares his comments on the policy and the broader context of the decision.

On Wednesday, NFL owners voted in a new national anthem policy. The policy states that if players kneel on the field or sidelines, their teams will be fined, but players are allowed to remain in the locker room while the anthem is played.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell is pleased with the decision, saying the protests created a “false perception among many that thousands of NFL players were unpatriotic.” President Trump is also applauding the policy, but says it doesn’t go far enough. He says he doesn’t think players should be staying in locker rooms to protest, and if a player is not standing for the anthem, “Maybe you shouldn’t be in the country.”

This hour, our guests discuss the new policy and what it means in the context of free speech. Our guests:

  • Simeon Banister, interim vice president of community programs at the Community Foundation
  • Chris Thomas, partner with Nixon Peabody
  • Matthew McGee, U.S. Coast Guard (retired), and marketing, events, and development manager for the Veterans Outreach Center
  • Paul Vosburgh, head coach of the St. John Fisher Football team

Physicians are reacting to President Trump’s recent decision to appoint Dr. Mehmet Oz to his Council on Sport, Fitness, and Nutrition. Many doctors and lawmakers across the country are criticizing the move, saying the celebrity doctor has promoted unscientific methods, discredited research, and “miracle” products on his program. He also faced backlash in 2012 for his episode on reparative therapy, which he claimed could turn gay people straight.

Oz tweeted that he’ll be advising the president on how to improve children’s health programs in school systems. Our guests discuss what the appointment could mean in the broad context, and the dangers of promoting pseudoscience. In studio:

  • Dr. Robert Cole, medical director for the Rochester Regional Health Primary Care and Ambulatory Specialties Institute
  • Dr. Elizabeth Murray, pediatrician at Golisano Children's Hospital at Strong

www.doctoroz.com

First hour: Dr. Oz and the dangers of promoting pseudoscience

Second hour: Discussing the NFL's new national anthem policy

After another mass school shooting, it has been reported that the gunman had been pursuing one of the female victims. While the reports have clashed, it's possible that the gunman felt rejected, and decided to murder the young woman for not accepting his advances.

Our panel discusses what we are teaching kids -- boys in particular -- about healthy relationships, and the rights of girls and women to say no. In studio:

The local public transportation system is about to change. "Reimagine RTS" is a year-long effort to revamp Rochester's public bus system to match community needs and desires. RTS just released phase three of the study. Phase three shares with the public the recommendations of RTS' consultant, and gathers more feedback.

So what should we expect to change, based on phase three? More bus routes? A new system entirely? We find out with RTS CEO Bill Carpenter

First hour: Discussing phase three of Reimagine RTS

Second hour: How are we teaching kids about healthy relationships?

The Reel Mind Theatre and Film Series is underway. It features films and performances that address the stigma attached to mental illness and behavior disorders, while providing messages of hope.

One of the films in this year's lineup is the documentary, Deej; it tells the story of David James Savarese, a non-speaking young man with autism. Savarese joins us in studio to share his remarkable journey and the challenges he has overcome. Plus, we get a look at what's next in the series. Our guests: 

  • Dr. Larry Guttmacher, M.D., clinical professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Rochester Medical Center, and co-director of the Reel Mind Film series
  • David James Savarese, poet, co-producer of Deej, and advocate for people with autism 
  • Dr. Lori Jeanne Peloquin, Ph.D., clinical psychologist in the Departments of Psychiatry and Pediatrics at the University of Rochester Medical Center
  • Lynne Fisher, education program administrator for NAMI-Rochester

Would cities look different if they were designed primarily by women? Katrina Johnston-Zimmerman thinks so. She’s an urban anthropologist advocating for gender equality in urban design.

Johnston-Zimmerman will be in Rochester next week to speak at the Community Design Center's Reshaping Rochester Series, but first, she joins us on Connections to share her research and ideas. Our guests:

First hour: What would cities designed by women look like?

Second hour: Discussing the Reel Mind Theatre and Film Series

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