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Connections

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Evan Dawson talks about what matters to you on ConnectionsEvery weekday from Noon-2 p.m. Be part of the program with questions or comments by phone - 1-844-295-TALK (8255), email, Facebook or Twitter

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An international disability rights activist known for his work in native Saudi Arabia is in Rochester. Mohammed Saad joins us to talk about his work to make a variety of every day life experiences more accessible for the visually impaired, including cooking, using technology, and event photography. He's our guest for the hour. 

When NPR tweeted the entire Declaration of Independence, a small but vocal set of Twitter users thoughts it was offensive. They didn't know what they were reading, and thought it was an anti-Trump screed.

So what are we teaching kids about the Declaration of Independence and American history? And why do immigrants fare so much better than American citizens on naturalization tests? We explore these questions with our guests:

  • Evvy Fanning, local high school English teacher
  • Samuel Bovard, 7th and 8th grade ESOL/ELA teacher in the Rochester City School District
  • Kevin Meuwissen, associate professor of teaching and curriculum, social studies education scholar, and director of teacher education for the Warner School of Education at the University of Rochester
  • Michael Oberg, distinguished professor of history at SUNY Geneseo

NPR

First hour: How we teach students the Declaration of Independence and American history

Second hour: Saudi disability rights activist Mohammed Saad

Weekend Connections is a collection of some of the most noteworthy moments from the week on Connections with Evan Dawson. This episode includes conversations about:

  • Access to birth certificates and family information for people who have been adopted in New York State*;
  • The therapeutic benefits of friendship for people with mental illness;
  • The value of print reporting, and a small-town newspaper that won a Pulitzer Prize.

*Correction: In the podcast, the host and producer say the legislation has passed the New York State Assembly, but the bill has passed both the Assembly and the Senate.

We hear the adoption story of a local man. Caleb Shulman learned at age seven that he was adopted. As an adult, he set out to find his birth family and access his birth certificate. While he was able to connect with his biological mother, he has not been able to obtain his original birth certificate.

The New York State Legislature passed a bill that it says would help adoptees over the age of 18 access their birth certificates and information about their biological parents. The bill is pending Governor Cuomo's approval. Some opponents of the legislation say it doesn't go far enough in protecting the rights of adoptees and would make it more difficult for adoptees to see their birth certificates. Some supporters say the bill is a compromise to those who want to protect the identity of birth parents [even though confidentiality is not promised in surrender papers] and would be a meaningful adoptee rights law in New York State.  We discuss issues of confidentiality, the adoption process, and more. Our guests:

  • Caleb Shulman, adoptee
  • Laura Glasner, adoption director for Correct: The podcast recording include

Tens of thousands of Americans die from opioid overdoses each year. In March of 2016, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced independent pharmacies in New York State would be able to provide Narcan -- a medication that reverses the effects of opioid overdose -- without a prescription. Despite this accessibility, Monroe County Commissioner of Public Health Dr. Mike Mendoza says few people are taking advantage of the availability of the kits. He says lack of awareness and stigma contribute to the issue. 

Our guests discuss the opioid epidemic and overdose prevention. In studio:

  • Dr. Mike Mendoza, M.D., Monroe County Commissioner of Public Health
  • Jennifer Faringer, director of DePaul's National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence-Rochester Area (NCADD-RA)
  • Dr. Holly Russell, M.D., family physician and primary care Suboxone prescriber

npr.org

First hour: The opioid epidemic and overdose prevention

Second hour: Access to records for adoptees in New York State

We kick off our annual Summer of Food series with a conversation about women in the wine industry. We’re joined by organizers of an upcoming symposium hosted by the Finger Lakes chapter of Women for WineSense. The organization’s Grand Event later this month will cover a number of subjects, including the science of food and wine, how wine factors into a healthy lifestyle, how dessert wines fit into the craft cocktail scene, and more.

Our guests discuss current issues in the wine industry, and the origins of the Women for WineSense group: why it was formed, how it has evolved, and its goals for the future. Our guests:

  • Donna Schlosser Long, president of the Women for WineSense Finger Lakes Chapter
  • Katie Roller, co-chair for the Women for WineSense Grand Event
  • Michaela Rodeno, co-founder of Women for WineSense
  • Julie Johnson, co-founder of Women for WineSense

Saturday marks one year since the Black Lives Matter protest in Rochester. The demonstrations near East and Alexander Streets lasted hours, with more than 70 people being arrested by police in riot gear, who said they were trying to keep the peace. A year later, activists who were part of that protest are sharing their thoughts about the movement’s progress and goals.

We talk to them about the successes and their frustrations. In studio:

  • Frederick Douglass (pseudonym), Black Lives Matter organizer
  • Nicole, Black Lives Matter organizer
  • Jazper, Black Lives Matter organizer
  • Tonya Noel, co-founder of the Flower City Noire Collective and director of Cause N FX Greenspace

Saturday marks one year since the Black Lives Matter protest in Rochester. The demonstrations near East and Alexander Streets lasted hours, with more than 70 people being arrested by police in riot gear, who said they were trying to keep the peace. A year later, activists who were part of that protest are sharing their thoughts about the movement’s progress and goals.

We talk to them about the successes and their frustrations. In studio:

  • Frederick Douglass (pseudonym), Black Lives Matter organizer
  • Nicole, Black Lives Matter organizer
  • Jazper, Black Lives Matter organizer
  • Tonya Noel, co-founder of the Flower City Noire Collective and director of Cause N FX Greenspace

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