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Connections

Weekdays Noon-2:00 p.m. on WXXI-AM 1370, FM 107.5, and WRUR-FM 88.5 in Rochester and WEOS 89.5 FM in Geneva

Evan Dawson talks about what matters to you on ConnectionsEvery weekday from Noon-2 p.m. Be part of the program with questions or comments by phone - 1-844-295-TALK (8255), email, Facebook or Twitter

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Ways to Connect

It’s the kickoff of our annual Summer of Food series. We’re joined by local chefs who discuss the modern food movement, what’s “hot” in the culinary scene, and the legacy of Anthony Bourdain. Our guests:

  • Mark Cupolo, chef and owner of Rocco
  • Zaaqi "Zoc" Johnson, chef and owner of Zoc's Gourmet
  • Andrew Bush, chef de cuisine at Bobby V’s in Stamford, Connecticut

The latest film in the “Jurassic Park” series, “Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom,” is number one at the box office. It goes to show that even decades after the first film was made, people still love dinosaurs. Dinosaur enthusiasts are also commenting about the latest in science related to the creatures. Researchers say they think they can recreate living dinosaurs within the next five years; genetic research involving modern day chickens could be the key to reversing evolution.

We discuss the science, how probable it is that we’ll see dinosaurs in our lifetime, and why the dinosaur craze won’t be going extinct anytime soon. Our guests:

Universal Pictures

First hour: Will we see living dinosaurs in our lifetime?

Second hour: Summer of Food - The modern food movement and the legacy of Anthony Bourdain

greglouganis.com

First hour: Special rebroadcast - Olympic gold medalist and LGBTQ activist Greg Louganis

Second hour: Capitol Steps - Politics Takes a Holiday, July 4th Edition

We discuss disparities in autism diagnosis and treatment. The death of Trevyan Rowe has pushed the Golisano Autism Center to speed up plans to provide some services to families of children with autism in the City of Rochester.

According to the CDC, about 1 in 59 children has been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and the percentage of autism among African American and Hispanic children is nearing the percentage in white children. But African American and Hispanic children are less likely to receive ASD diagnoses and intervention services. Why? Studies point to a number of factors, including parent education, difficulty navigating the medical system, cultural barriers, and more.

We talk to the team at the Golisano Autism Center about how they hope to reduce those gaps in the near future. In studio:

Polling shows that the number of Americans who self-identify as non-religious is rising. But many atheists say this is actually a difficult time for them in this country. That’s because lawmakers who cite deeply religious backgrounds often set policy. The Supreme Court is just the latest front in those battles.

We discuss it with a panel of non-religious people and leaders. In studio:

First hour: Atheism and politics

Second hour: Disparities in autism diagnosis and treatment

Why do so few people vote? Last week, in primaries across the country, a very small percentage of voters decided to participate. New York State had particularly small turnout in most of its primary races. That has turned the spotlight on New York voting rules, including hours of voting, early voting, mail-in voting, registration, and more. Does something need to change? 

Our guests discuss how to improve voting access and enthusiasm. In studio:

If you’re a smartphone user, have you ever considered switching back to a “dumb” phone? According to the Pew Research Center, 95 percent of Americans own a cellphone, and the share of those that own a smartphone is 77 percent. But new research shows that there are a growing number of people who have ditched the smartphone for flip phones or other phones not connected to the Internet.

While it’s unlikely that we’ll ever be back to the days of brick phones or landlines, experts say the reasons behind the dumb phone gaining popularity – security, financial, mental health – are worth discussing. This hour, we have a conversation about technology, boundaries, and how our devices impact our health (and you can stream it on your smartphone). In studio:

  • Caitlin Whyte, reporter and host of Weekend Edition at WXXI
  • Dr. Eric Caine, M.D., former chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Rochester
  • Mike Johansson, senior lecturer of communication at RIT, and social media consultant with Fixitology
  • Mark Sample, professor of history at MCC, and self-identified “dumb” phone user

freeimages.com/Eric Gross

First hour: The return of the "dumb" phone

Second hour: How to improve access to voting

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