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Connections

Weekdays Noon-2:00 p.m. on WXXI-AM 1370, FM 107.5, and WRUR-FM 88.5 in Rochester and WEOS 89.5 FM in Geneva

Evan Dawson talks about what matters to you on ConnectionsEvery weekday from Noon-2 p.m. Be part of the program with questions or comments by phone - 1-844-295-TALK (8255), email, Facebook or Twitter

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Ways to Connect

First hour: Will we see single-payer healthcare in New York State?

Second hour: Author Peter Lovenheim and his book, "The Attachment Effect"

Weekend Connections is a collection of some of the most noteworthy moments from the week on Connections with Evan Dawson. This episode includes conversations about:

  • The debate over trigger warnings;
  • The corrosive power of hate, with Holocaust survivor Helen Levinson;
  • The power of music on memory for people living with dementia;
  • Politics, comedy, and more, with John Cleese.

Apple is responding to pressure from stakeholders to provide features on its devices that will allow parents to monitor and limit screen time for their children. In response, Apple announced a new app called Screen Time.

This hour, we discuss screen time recommendations for children and teens, and the role that both technology companies and healthcare providers have in working with parents to address issues regarding devices and internet use. Our guests: 

  • Dr. Elizabeth Murray, M.D., assistant professor of pediatrics and pediatrician at Golisano Children's Hospital
  • Dr. Steve Cook, M.D., associate professor of pediatrics and pediatrician at Golisano Children's Hospital
  • Dr. Dipesh Navsaria, M.D., associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health

Last month, while on a tour for prospective students at Colorado State University, a woman called police, saying she was concerned that two young men in the group were not meant to be part of the tour. She said they stood out and were wearing clothing with "weird symbolism." The two young men are Native American and had driven seven hours from New Mexico to take part in the tour. Police patted them down and eventually allowed them to rejoin the tour, but by that time, the group was long gone. The story has caused outrage, with many people comparing it to the racial profiling incident at a Starbucks, where two black men were arrested while waiting for a friend. 

Two local groups say communities need to better understand indigenous rights and history; they are partnering to combat racism against Native Americans. We discuss their efforts. In studio:

shutterstock.com/AndriiOleksiienko

First hour: Addressing racism toward Native Americans

Second hour: Screen time recommendations for children and teens

We hear the story of a local Holocaust survivor. Helen Levinson was born in Poland and was sent to a concentration camp during the war. She escaped with the help of a Nazi guard, but lost her parents and siblings.

Her remarkable story is part of a new play called "Survivors" at the Jewish Community Center. We hear Levinson's story in her own words. Our guests:

  • Helen Levinson, Holocaust survivor
  • Alexa Scott-Flaherty, actor who portrays Helen in the play, “Survivors”
  • Freyda Schneider, co-producer of "Survivors," and director of TYKEs at the Jewish Community Center

The Democrat and Chronicle is launching a new project aiming at the inequity in our public school system. What have they found, and what might change it?

Our guests discuss those questions and more:

  • Julie Philipp, senior engagement editor for the Democrat and Chronicle
  • Justin Murphy, education reporter for the Democrat and Chronicle

www.rochesterholocaustsurvivors.org

First hour: Examining the inequities in the local public education system

Second hour: Holocaust survivor Helen Levinson and the play, "Survivors" 

Two British newspapers expressed their shock over “thin-skinned, liberal foot-stomping millennials” sympathizing with the monster in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. The newspapers say these “snowflakes” claiming the monster was a misunderstood victim shows how idealistic today’s students can be. It’s just one example in a list of classic works that the newspapers say millennials are misinterpreting. The other titles include “Animal Farm,” “Lolita,” “Lord of the Flies,” and more.

What do you think? Do you agree with the newspapers that these millennials are just “too touchy?” Or are they right, and do their perceptions serve as a Rorschach test for how they view criminal justice, the #MeToo movement, and more? Our guests discuss these questions and the role of classic literature. In studio:

  • Lester Friedman, retired professor and former chair of the Media and Society Program at Hobart and William Smith Colleges, and co-author of “Monstrous Progeny”
  • Karen van Meenen, senior lecturer in the Department of English at RIT, and coordinator of the Rochester Reads and Debut Novel Series programs at Writers & Books
  • Jamie Rudd, AmericaCorps volunteer for the Gandhi Institute for Nonviolence
  • Katherine Varga, playwright and SummerWrite coordinator for Writers & Books

The story of a Rochester police officer advising a man to break into the home of his estranged girlfriend has raised a number of questions about women’s safety, gun rights, and allegations of domestic violence. The boyfriend showed up at his ex-girlfriend’s house, looking for some of his possessions. When she refused to let him in and the police arrived, an officer told the boyfriend that if he had lived there – which he had – it was his legal right to break in. That’s when the girlfriend pointed a firearm out the window. She said she had been a victim of domestic violence, and was afraid of the boyfriend.

This hour, our panel discusses the bigger picture issues raised by this case:  the safety of women and their right to use firearms to protect themselves in their own homes, plus, how to respond to women who are making allegations that they have been victims of physical altercations. Our guests:

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