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Connections

Weekdays Noon-2:00 p.m. on WXXI-AM 1370, FM 107.5, and WRUR-FM 88.5 in Rochester and WEOS 89.5 FM in Geneva

Evan Dawson talks about what matters to you on ConnectionsEvery weekday from Noon-2 p.m. Be part of the program with questions or comments by phone - 1-844-295-TALK (8255), email, Facebook or Twitter

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Our Dialogue on Disability Week continues with a conversation about adaptive sports. According to the CDC, nearly half of adults with disabilities ages 18 to 64 do not get aerobic physical activity. Local organizations are helping to change that by offering opportunities in adaptive sports.

We hear the stories of local athletes in those programs. Our guests:

  • Michael Cocquyt, supervisor of SportsNet
  • Jen Truscott, alpine skier
  • David Grace, sled hockey athlete, who participates in many winter sports

The New York Times recently published a piece describing the kinds of regulations under which farmers and small businesses work. It sparked conversations about which regulations are necessary and appropriate, and which create unnecessary burdens.

We hear from local and regional farmers. Our guests:

DANIEL M. VASTA/RIT

First hour: How regulations impact farmers and small businesses

Second hour: Dialogue on Disability: Adaptive sports

Monroe County and the City of Rochester are teaming up with a number of local organizations to celebrate the legacy of abolitionist and Rochester resident Frederick Douglass. Douglass never knew the exact date of his own birth, but he eventually determined that he was born in February 1818. Now, 200 years later, the “Re-energizing the Legacy of Frederick Douglass” project will help the community explore his life and work.

This hour, we discuss Douglass’ legacy and his impact on Rochester, we preview the events and activities tied to the year-long program, and we discuss what Douglass would think about the politics of today. Our guests:

  • Carvin Eison, co-director of the Re-Energizing the Legacy of Frederick Douglass Project; associate professor of journalism, broadcasting and public relations at the College at Brockport; and general manager of Rochester Community Media
  • Bleu Cease, co-director of the Re-Energizing the Legacy of Frederick Douglass Project; and executive director of Rochester Contemporary Art Center
  • Christine Ridarsky, Rochester city historian

More than 88,000 homeless families are living in shelters across New York State. That’s according to a new housing activism campaign called Housing Justice for All. The coalition of state advocacy groups is dedicated to helping low-income tenants and homeless New Yorkers secure affordable, safe, and warm housing. The movement was launched in early January, coming just days before tenants in two Rochester apartment complexes exposed inadequate heating and additional problems in their buildings.

So what can tenants do to protect their rights? Some groups push the idea of a local Housing Court. Others are relying on advocacy at the state level. Our guests share the latest regarding tenants’ rights. In studio:

  • Ryan Acuff, member of the City-Wide Tenant Union and Take Back the Land
  • Kawanais Smith, tenant union president at Southview Towers
  • Jesus Miranda, resident of 960 Dewey Avenue

CITY OF ROCHESTER.GOV

First hour: How can tenants protect their rights?

Second hour: "Re-energizing the Legacy of Frederick Douglass"

We begin 2018's Dialogue on Disability Week with a conversation about autism. New research published in JAMA indicates that the rates of autism spectrum disorder among U.S. children remained stable from 2014 to 2016. That's a change from earlier studies, which suggested that autism rates rose steadily over the past 20 years. The authors of the recent study pointed to changes in diagnostic criteria, more public awareness, and more children being referred to doctors as among the principle reasons for the earlier increases.

Yet, as physicians, advocates, and parents are quick to point out, the stabilization shouldn't detract for exploring new treatments and adaptive experiences for children and adults with autism spectrum disorder. This hour, we discuss a range of issues related to autism, and explore options for care in our community. Our guests:

  • Dr. Susan Hyman, M.D., chief of developmental and behavioral pediatrics at UR Medicine's Golisano Children's Hospital at Strong
  • Mary Walsh Boatfield, CEO of CP Rochester, Happiness House, and Rochester Rehabilitation, and co-founder of the Golisano Autism Center
  • Michelle Maney, parent of a teenager who is on the autism spectrum
  • Sandra Erb-Petruccione, parent of an adult who is on the autism spectrum

When the iconic film Broadcast News was released in 1987, director James L. Brooks gave audiences a well-researched and honest look at how network news was changing. Some say it served as a warning of how an increasing emphasis on attractive anchors and entertainment-driven ideas were growing at the expense of quality journalism. Did the film predict the future of the news industry?

In a recent interview published in The Ringer, Brooks said he doesn't think his film created a lens for the future in the same way as did a film like Network. Instead, he said, with Broadcast News "the future was beginning to happen." Our guests discuss the film 30 years after its release, and if and how it rings true today. In studio:

  • Adam Chodak, anchor and managing editor for WROC-TV
  • Elissa Orlando, senior vice president of television and news for WXXI
  • Rebecca Leclair, owner of Leclair Communications, and former television news anchor and reporter

IMDB

First hour: Did the film Broadcast News predict the future of the news industry?

Second hour: Dialogue on Disability - A look at autism research and care in 2018

Weekend Connections is a collection of some of the most noteworthy moments from the week on Connections with Evan Dawson. This episode includes conversations about:

  • The debate over police officers' body-worn cameras;
  • How to improve access to healthy food in all communities;
  • Finding a balance between all modes of transportation.

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