Coming up on Connections: Tuesday, February 20

Feb 19, 2018

First hour: What does it mean to be a modern, American Christian?

Second hour: Should the voting age be changed to 16?

USA Today recently reported on the continuing support for President Trump among evangelical Christians. This comes a little more than a year after 81 percent of white evangelicals voted for Trump. Many leaders in the Christian conservative community sat that the administration’s list of wins – from judicial and personnel appointments to policy changes to pro-life agenda actions – has been lengthy. That has sparked conversations in the local Christian community, particularly among left-leaning faith-based organizations whose leaders say they are confused about that support. Our panel will discuss what it means to be a modern, American Christian. In studio:

  • Pastor Chris Holdridge, founder for 441 Ministries
  • Pastor Deb Swift, South Presbyterian Church

Then in our second hour, should the voting age be lowered to 16? It’s a question that has resurfaced over the last few days, as students across the country have spoken out about gun legislation following the mass school shooting in Florida. Advocates of lowering the voting age say that if students are already participating in politics and can work and drive, they shouldn’t be denied the civic responsibility of voting. Those against the idea say that 16 and 17 year olds are not mature enough to make informed decisions at the polls. Several U.S. cities have already lowered the voting age, as have several countries. Will it happen across the U.S.? What should the national voting age be? Our panelists debate the issue. Our guests:

  • Dylan Holcomb, senior student-activist and mindfulness facilitator at Brighton High School 
  • Sam Topa, freshman at McQuaid Jesuit High School
  • Zosan Soong, senior patent counsel at Xerox Corporation, and parent 
  • Mary Lupien, RCSD teacher
  • Tim Kneeland, professor and chair of the Department of History and Political Science at Nazareth College