WXXI AM News

Coming up on Connections: Thursday, October 12th

Oct 12, 2017

Credit FREEIMAGES.COM/TSUNEI MIYUKI

First hour: The impact of climate change on human health and nutrition

Second hour: How domestic violence affects victims and communities

When you think about the effects of climate change, perhaps your mind goes to drastic weather events, air pollution, or rising sea levels, but what about threats to human health and nutrition? Research shows that increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere are decreasing the nutritional value of fruits and vegetables. This research isn't new. In fact, a small, but growing group of scientists has been stressing how CO2 can significantly impact plant growth and nutrition since the 1990s, but no one seemed to be listening. That’s all changing as more evidence becomes available. We’ll dive into some of the research, and discuss how climate change can affect our food supply and our health, both in the short and long term. Our guests:

  • Jane Andrews, nutrition and labeling manager for Wegmans Food Markets
  • Dr. Ted Barnett, M.D., founder and medical director of Rochester Lifestyle Medicine; founder and board chair of the Rochester Lifestyle Medicine Institute; and co-coordinator of the Rochester Area Vegan Society
  • Sue Hughes-Smith, member of the Rochester People’s Climate Coalition
  • Walter Nelson, horticulture program leader at Cornell Cooperative Extension 
  • Bob King, certified crop advisor with the American Society of Agronomy, and senior agriculture specialist in the Agriculture and Life Sciences Institute at Monroe Community College
  • Ruth Blackwell, owner of Mud Creek Farm

Then in our second hour, reports of domestic violence in Monroe County are down for the sixth year in a row, but the rates are still higher than the state average. While there’s value in studying statistics when it comes to this issue, each report of intimate partner violence reflects how the life of someone in our community has been impacted by trauma. Victims of domestic violence suffer from visible and hidden burdens, and often find it challenging to seek help. A new organization hopes to change that. We’ll discuss how the HEAL Collaborative brings together social services and legal entities in our area to assist victims and their families. We’ll also hear from survivors of domestic violence, who will share their stories and discuss their road to recovery. In studio:

  • Jaime Saunders, president and CEO of Willow Domestic Violence Center
  • Ellen Poleshuck, director of the HEAL Collaborative at the University of Rochester Medical Center
  • Elaine Bell, intimate partner violence survivor and advocate
  • Michelle ReQua, intimate partner violence survivor and advocate