WXXI AM News

Dave Rosenthal

Dave Rosenthal is Managing Editor of Great Lakes Today, a collaboration of public media stations that is led by WBFO, ideastream in Cleveland in WXXI in Rochester, and includes other stations in the region.

Dave comes to Buffalo from Baltimore, where he was the investigations/enterprise editor for The Sun. He led projects that won a number of honors, including the Clark Mollenhoff Award for Excellence in Investigative Reporting, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism's Paul Tobenkin Memorial Award and the Investigative Reporters & Editors’ breaking news award. The newsroom’s work on the death of Freddie Gray was recognized by The American Society of News Editors, the Online News Association and the National Headliners Awards, in addition to being named a finalist for a 2016 Pulitzer Prize.

He began his journalism career as a reporter for the Roanoke Times and World-News, where he covered local government, the Virginia General Assembly and business. In Roanoke and Baltimore, he has reported on a wide range of topics and people, including a zoo architect in Seattle, the recovery of a Civil War ironclad off the Atlantic coast and the emerging market economy in the Soviet Union.

A native of New Britain, Conn., Dave has degrees from Wesleyan University and Boston University School of Law.

In his spare time, he can be found biking the roads and trails around Buffalo – and cheering on various sports teams, including the UConn Huskies.

The Great Lakes offer lots of spookiness -- from century-old shipwrecks to blood-sucking animals. For Halloween, we pulled together some of the creepiest photos. Take a look -- if you dare.

For anyone who doubts the power of the Great Lakes, now's the time for a reset.

This week, data buoys on Lake Superior recorded 28.8-foot waves, according to the Great Lakes Observing System.

In the after-glow of Monday's eclipse, we can start looking forward to an even more exciting event for the Great Lakes region: the 2024 total solar eclipse.

The Asian carp captured this summer near the southern tip of Lake Michigan -- triggering a big scare -- apparently slipped past electric barriers.


A new non-native species has been found in western Lake Erie, the EPA said Monday.

It's named Brachionus leydigii. And it's a type of zooplankton, which means it could be food for lots of fish.

On Tuesday, environmental advocates will be watching closely as a Congressional spending committee considers a $300 million restoration program for the Great Lakes.

Update: Committee vote is good news for the Great Lakes.

President Trump's 2018 budget plan eliminated the money, which has gone to a wide range of projects -- from cleaning up pollution to battling the Asian carp. Now, Congress has a chance to restore funding to the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.

​As scientists forecast a significant algae bloom in Lake Erie this summer, environmental groups are calling for tougher government policies to reduce pollution from farms.


There's some good news from Illinois, where an Asian Carp was recently caught just nine miles from Lake Michigan.

In two weeks of intensive, follow-up monitoring, no bighead or silver Asian carp were found, a regional monitoring group says.  

Upset by continued flooding on the Lake Ontario shoreline, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo wants to shake up the bi-national group that helps to regulate the Great Lakes.

New York's legislative session ended Thursday, as lawmakers approved a $55 million aid package for areas hit by continued flooding along Lake Ontario.

The package, hammered out by Gov. Andrew Cuomo and legislative leaders, makes state grants available to property owners and businesses, as well as localities. 

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