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Historic Hotel DeMay in Greece has been demolished

An historic building in the Town of Greece has been torn down. The early 20 th century building known as the Hotel DeMay in Greece, at the intersection of North Greece and Latta Roads was demolished on Friday, which a local preservation group says happened a day after a demolition permit was issued. The hotel was built in 1909 and according to the Landmark Society it served as a community gathering place and tavern and entertainment establishment for nearly a century. It’s been vacant since...

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New medical guidelines lower the threshold for high blood pressure.

High pressure has long meant a reading of at least 140 over 90. That drops to 130 over 80 in the new guidelines announced by the American Heart Association and other health professional organizations.

This means nearly half of American adults have the condition. Dr. John Bisognano, a cardiologist at UR Medicine and president of the American Society of Hypertension, said the change comes with mounting evidence that it's worth treating people for hypertension at the lower end of the spectrum.

Coming up on Need to Know, New York superintendents are coming together to discuss one thing: issues of diversity in public schools. Find out why they say change must begin at the district-level.

Also on the show, it’s an alternative to home care for seniors and the concept is spreading. How “small neighborhoods and “small homes” are changing nursing home culture right here in Rochester.

Don’t miss these stories and more this week on Need to Know.

J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE / AP

First hour: Discussing the GOP's new tax plan

Second hour: What hospitals can learn from the airline industry

Updated at 6:25 p.m. ET

Attorney General Jeff Sessions told the House Judiciary Committee Tuesday that his "story has never changed" about his and other Trump campaign officials' connections to Russia.

"I will not accept, and reject accusations that I have ever lied," Sessions said. "That is a lie!"

Rochester Police Department

Rochester police have charged a mother with murder in connection with the death of her 10-day old son.

Officers were called to a home at 31 Locust Street Monday afternoon for a report of an unresponsive child.  They were told the baby, Jeremiah Mitchell, was found in that condition in the bathtub.

25-year old Markiya Mitchell, the infant's mother, later admitted to intentionally drowning Jeremiah in the bathtub. She has a 7-year old child who is being cared for by a family member.

Spectrum News

Rochester City Court Judge Leticia Astacio on Monday pleaded guilty to one of the probation violations against her, in exchange for time already served in jail.

She had been back in jail since last Thursday following a court appearance over her latest alleged probation violation related to her 2016 DWI conviction.

A federal appeals court in California has ruled that the Trump administration's long-delayed travel ban can go into partial effect, allowing the government to temporarily keep travelers from six Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States.

The state’s top economic development official says a plan in Congress to eliminate the historic tax credit program  would harm efforts to revitalize cities in New York.

Empire State Development Chair Howard Zemsky , testifying at an Assembly hearing,  says the tax incentives have been used to rehab crumbling historic buildings into shops and living spaces, and “have had a huge impact on driving economic development” . The program gives developers a tax rebate of 20% for five years after the projects are completed. Zemsky says it’s misguided to end the subsidies.

In modern media, success usually means following up with the same thing that brought success. Music, television -- think about why the characters on Friends only became caricatures of themselves. But 25 years ago, a band went against the popular grain.

R.E.M. had found massive commercial success with their 1991 hits like "Stand" and "Shiny Happy People." Suddenly, just as popular as Madonna, the band had a chance to fire off more and similar hits. But their 1992 album, Automatic for the People, is one of the darker pop albums of the era. Songs about suicide prevention and tragedy were not exactly what the producers were hoping for, but the band stayed with their vision. Is there a lesson there? We examine with our guests:

What truly makes someone happy? SUNY Geneseo psychology professor Jim Allen collected the data and produced a new book called The Psychology of Happiness in the Modern World.

We discuss the impacts of economic systems, income inequality, and more.

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Sexual-assault allegations against Roy Moore have reverberated from Alabama to Washington, D.C.

Many Republican leaders have pulled their support from Moore, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin and Colorado Sen. Cory Gardner, the head of National Republican Senatorial Committee, the committee in charge of electing GOP senators.

The 'Missed Opportunity' Of Trump's Asia Trip

1 hour ago

When President Trump returned this week from a 12-day, five-nation swing through Asia, he gave himself high marks for the "tremendous success of this trip."

But experts say that while he avoided major blunders during his stops in Japan, South Korea, Japan, Vietnam and the Philippines, the president missed more than one opportunity to offer his administration's strategic vision for the region — the world's largest, most populous and fastest growing.

When he started working as a bartender a few years ago in Seattle, Howie Echo-Hawk says he began experiencing discrimination. First, a bar manager told him to get a respectable haircut.

"I had a Mohawk, which is the traditional style of my people and I wore it because of that," he said. Echo-Hawk is a member of the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma.

Rather than argue, Echo-Hawk cut his hair. Then, a few months later, he broke his ankle and had to take some time off.

Every time there is a mass shooting in the United States, there is a flurry of concentration on those who died, the alleged or confessed perpetrator, and the sobered, devastated town that will be forever changed.

Then at some point, the press caravan moves on — from Sutherland Springs, from Orlando, from Las Vegas. And within weeks, or sometimes just days, another mass shooting is being reported.

The public attention moves on, but those affected families don't.

More news from NPR

From the Inclusion Desk

Caitlin Whyte / WXXI News

  

The benefits of music on individuals with autism are widely known. Improved focus, advances in speech and language, and better motor skills. But sometimes it’s about the growth that you can’t quantify in numbers.

On a Tuesday night in a sleepy plaza in Penfield, the Music Education Center is buzzing. Kids are in the waiting room, parents are catching up and students are practicing anything from trombone to piano.

Noah Svokos is a curly haired 13 year old who has been taking piano lessons for 5 years at the center.

NPR.org

NPR's 2016 Tiny Desk Contest Winner Gaelynn Lea is in Rochester this weekend for a performance at Nazareth College Saturday.

She never thought she would be a performer full time. Which is a funny thought to come from someone who in the last year had 200 shows in 39 states and 6 different countries.

Born with Brittle Bone Disease, Lea is a violin player but also uses the platform she’s been given to talk about disability rights.

An emerging model called self-direction is enabling people with disabilities to live more independent lives. Self-directed individuals choose where they live, they design their own days and activities, and they have more control over the funding they receive for daily support services.

While the model has produced positive results for people in our community, advocates say not everyone knows about it or understands the process well. We discuss what self-direction means, and we hear from people in our community who are navigating the process. Our guests:

The winner of NPR's 2016 Tiny Desk Concert is a remarkable musician from Duluth, Minnesota named Gaelynn Lea. Lea is a classically trained fiddler whose music includes Celtic and American fiddle traditions. Her submission, Someday We'll Linger in the Sun, was the judges' unanimous choice. If you watch Lea's video, you'll notice that she plays her violin in a style that you might not expect -- she holds it in front of herself, like a cello.

Lea has brittle bone disease, and when she fell in love with the cello as a young student, it was difficult for her to hold it. A teacher noticed, was inspired by Lea's gift for music, and helped her learn how to play the violin in the same style. Now, Lea plays solo shows and with her band. She's also a teacher and an advocate for people with disabilities. 

We talk to Lea about her music, her success, and about how to make all stages accessible to everyone.  She'll be in Rochester for a performance and talk at Nazareth College, but first, she joins us on Connections. Our guests:

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

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