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Historic Hotel DeMay in Greece has been demolished

An historic building in the Town of Greece has been torn down. The early 20 th century building known as the Hotel DeMay in Greece, at the intersection of North Greece and Latta Roads was demolished on Friday, which a local preservation group says happened a day after a demolition permit was issued. The hotel was built in 1909 and according to the Landmark Society it served as a community gathering place and tavern and entertainment establishment for nearly a century. It’s been vacant since...

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Former Vice President Joe Biden, in an interview that aired on Wednesday's Morning Edition, says that he has no plans to run for president in 2020 but that it would be "foolish" to rule it out entirely.

Updated at 6:05 a.m. ET Wednesday

Zimbabwe's army said Wednesday that it has seized control in what is being described as "a bloodless transition" that has apparently pushed aside President Robert Mugabe. The military said he and his family are "safe and sound."

Armored vehicles and soldiers patrolled streets in the capital, Harare, amid loud explosions overnight. Soldiers reportedly took control of the headquarters of the national broadcaster, ZBC, and an army spokesman said on air: "This is not a military takeover."

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Federal recovery aid will be coming to Lake Ontario shoreline communities after President Donald Trump issued a major disaster declaration for spring and summer flooding.

The declaration issued Tuesday includes Niagara, Orleans, Wayne, Oswego, Jefferson and St. Lawrence counties.

It omits two lakefront counties, Monroe and Cayuga, but says additional designations could be added later if warranted.

Rochester Rhinos

The Rochester Rhinos says the head coach of that soccer team is leaving to assume similar duties with the Pittsburgh Riverhounds.

Bob Lilley coached a total of 177 matches and compiled a record of 87-37-53, while serving as the Rochester Rhinos head coach during two stints: 2010 - 211 and 2014 - 2017. 

He had just led the team to the 2015 USL Championship four months before David and Wendy Dworkin took over as owners of the franchise in March of 2016.

Monroe County Executive Cheryl Dinolfo unveiled a $1.2 billion budget on Tuesday. She says for the second straight year, the spending plan holds the county property tax rate flat at $8.99 per $1,000 of assessed value. Dinolfo also says the budget holds overall spending growth to 1.3 percent, well below the rate of inflation.

And the county executive says her 2018 budget plan reduces the two-year forecasted structural deficit by $8.2 million to $36.4 million.

What can hospitals learn from the airline industry? Pilot and author John Nance says they can improve their quality of care and reduce medical mistakes if they adapt safety measures designed for airlines. He joins us in studio to explain how it would work.

  • John Nance, author of Why Hospitals Should Fly, and a lawyer, pilot, veteran, and ABC News analyst
  • Amie Kulak, director of quality and education for Rochester Regional Healthcare Association
  • Nancy Tinsley, president of Rochester General Hospital

Congress is debating a new tax plan that would bring changes for many American families. So how does it work? Who would benefit, and who would pay more? Our guests:

Matt Ryan New York Now

Two reports issued in recent days indicate that Gov. Andrew Cuomo may be facing his most difficult budget in seven years.

The midyear financial report by the governor’s budget office has lowered revenue estimates by $850 million for the current budget year and the next two years. And it finds that next year’s projected deficit is now at $4.4 billion, if spending growth continues unchecked.

Cuomo began sounding the alarm weeks before the report was released.

Champion Academy receives a $1 million dollar gift

Nov 14, 2017
Alex Crichton

A program founded by former NFL player and Rochester native Roland Williams has received a $1,000,000 gift to kick off its first fundraising campaign.

The Champion Academy, Extreme Mentoring & Empowerment Initiative is aimed at teens living in poverty, and giving them the support they need to overcome obstacles and maximize their human potential.

That one million dollar gift comes from the William and Mildred Levine Foundation.

“Who are your heroes and what do they do? Do they ever think about me or think about you?” And so begins a series of contemplative questions in a children’s book intended to help young people reimagine the concept of a hero. It’s aptly titled HEROES and it’s written by Rochester City School Board President Van White who explains “real” heroes aren’t the ones donning flashy capes. 

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Sexual-assault allegations against Roy Moore have reverberated from Alabama to Washington, D.C.

Many Republican leaders have pulled their support from Moore, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin and Colorado Sen. Cory Gardner, the head of National Republican Senatorial Committee, the committee in charge of electing GOP senators.

The 'Missed Opportunity' Of Trump's Asia Trip

1 hour ago

When President Trump returned this week from a 12-day, five-nation swing through Asia, he gave himself high marks for the "tremendous success of this trip."

But experts say that while he avoided major blunders during his stops in Japan, South Korea, Japan, Vietnam and the Philippines, the president missed more than one opportunity to offer his administration's strategic vision for the region — the world's largest, most populous and fastest growing.

When he started working as a bartender a few years ago in Seattle, Howie Echo-Hawk says he began experiencing discrimination. First, a bar manager told him to get a respectable haircut.

"I had a Mohawk, which is the traditional style of my people and I wore it because of that," he said. Echo-Hawk is a member of the Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma.

Rather than argue, Echo-Hawk cut his hair. Then, a few months later, he broke his ankle and had to take some time off.

Every time there is a mass shooting in the United States, there is a flurry of concentration on those who died, the alleged or confessed perpetrator, and the sobered, devastated town that will be forever changed.

Then at some point, the press caravan moves on — from Sutherland Springs, from Orlando, from Las Vegas. And within weeks, or sometimes just days, another mass shooting is being reported.

The public attention moves on, but those affected families don't.

More news from NPR

From the Inclusion Desk

Caitlin Whyte / WXXI News

  

The benefits of music on individuals with autism are widely known. Improved focus, advances in speech and language, and better motor skills. But sometimes it’s about the growth that you can’t quantify in numbers.

On a Tuesday night in a sleepy plaza in Penfield, the Music Education Center is buzzing. Kids are in the waiting room, parents are catching up and students are practicing anything from trombone to piano.

Noah Svokos is a curly haired 13 year old who has been taking piano lessons for 5 years at the center.

NPR.org

NPR's 2016 Tiny Desk Contest Winner Gaelynn Lea is in Rochester this weekend for a performance at Nazareth College Saturday.

She never thought she would be a performer full time. Which is a funny thought to come from someone who in the last year had 200 shows in 39 states and 6 different countries.

Born with Brittle Bone Disease, Lea is a violin player but also uses the platform she’s been given to talk about disability rights.

An emerging model called self-direction is enabling people with disabilities to live more independent lives. Self-directed individuals choose where they live, they design their own days and activities, and they have more control over the funding they receive for daily support services.

While the model has produced positive results for people in our community, advocates say not everyone knows about it or understands the process well. We discuss what self-direction means, and we hear from people in our community who are navigating the process. Our guests:

The winner of NPR's 2016 Tiny Desk Concert is a remarkable musician from Duluth, Minnesota named Gaelynn Lea. Lea is a classically trained fiddler whose music includes Celtic and American fiddle traditions. Her submission, Someday We'll Linger in the Sun, was the judges' unanimous choice. If you watch Lea's video, you'll notice that she plays her violin in a style that you might not expect -- she holds it in front of herself, like a cello.

Lea has brittle bone disease, and when she fell in love with the cello as a young student, it was difficult for her to hold it. A teacher noticed, was inspired by Lea's gift for music, and helped her learn how to play the violin in the same style. Now, Lea plays solo shows and with her band. She's also a teacher and an advocate for people with disabilities. 

We talk to Lea about her music, her success, and about how to make all stages accessible to everyone.  She'll be in Rochester for a performance and talk at Nazareth College, but first, she joins us on Connections. Our guests:

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

Rochester: Hub For Photonics

What is photonics and why is it coming to Rochester?

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