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RPD Officer wounded by gunfire

UPDATE: as of 9:20 a.m. : During a 9am media briefing, RPD Chief Michael Ciminelli said that the ‘tactical’ part of the overnight investigation has ended, but a portion of North St. remains closed. He did not release any more details on the type of wounds Officer Nash suffered, but said Nash is in good spirits considering the circumstances. Ciminelli thanked the many people in the Rochester area who have expressed thoughts of concern for the injured officer, and also praised the cooperation...

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Saudi Arabia's King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud has changed his pick for a successor, naming his son Prince Mohammed bin Salman as crown prince and deposing Prince Mohammed bin Nayef from the post. At 31, the country's new successor to the throne is 50 years younger than the current monarch.

Uber Co-Founder Travis Kalanick Resigns Under Pressure As CEO

Jun 21, 2017

Updated at 9:50 a.m. ET

The chief of Uber has resigned. Travis Kalanick, under pressure from his top investors, announced his departure Tuesday night. The move, which comes as a surprise to employees, plunges one of the largest private companies on Earth into an even bigger leadership vacuum.

A week ago, Kalanick said he was stepping away from his position as CEO temporarily, taking a leave of absence to mourn his mother, who recently died in a boating accident, and to work on his leadership, to grow into "Travis 2.0."

Two local villages held elections on Tuesday, Brockport and Webster.

In Brockport, where there was a contested election, incumbent Mayor Margaret Blackman, who was first elected in 2013, defeated challengers Lyle Stirk and Carol Hannan.

Blackman had about 52 percent of the vote; Stirk 36 percent and Hannan about 12 percent.

There were also two trustee seats on the ballot in Brockport, and Blackman’s running mates, incumbents Katherine Kristansen and Annie Crane, were the apparent winners.

Pittsford School District voters approved a budget for the upcoming school year on Tuesday, by a more than two to one margin. The vote was 3,107 yes and 1,234 no.

A second vote was necessary after Pittsford rejected  a spending plan in May.  At that time, the budget failed to secure the 60 percent super-majority of votes necessary because district officials wanted to exceed the state tax cap.

The new budget does not include money for funding full-day kindergarten. Pittsford is one just a few school districts in the state without full-day kindergarten.

Rochester City Council on Tuesday night approved the 2017-18 proposed budgets for the city and for the school district.

The city budget was passed unanimously, and the RCSD budget passed by a vote of 8 – 1, with Council member Carolee Conklin voting against it.

Updated at 1:20 p.m. ET on June 21

Republican Karen Handel has won the costly and closely watched special congressional election in Georgia's 6th District, a blow to Democratic hopes of pulling off an upset in a district that President Trump only narrowly carried last year.

The former Georgia secretary of state won by almost 4 points, beating Jon Ossoff, a 30-year-old documentary filmmaker and former congressional staffer — 51.9 percent to 48.1 percent.

Belgian soldiers patrolling Central Station in Brussels Tuesday night shot a suspect after a small explosion that officials called a "terror attack."

Eric Van der Sypt, spokesman for the Belgian federal prosecutor's office, said that after the blast "the suspected perpetrator was neutralized by the soldiers present." No bystanders were injured in the explosion and the station was evacuated.

Van der Sypt said it is unknown whether the suspect survived being shot. He also said he does not know the attacker's identity.

wshu.org

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP)  New York has raised the age of marriage to 17, replacing a law that allowed children as young as 14 to legally wed. 

Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed the measure Tuesday. The law requires individuals 17 or 18 to get judicial and parental approval before marrying. 

New York had been one of only three states that allowed 14-year-olds to marry, the others being North Carolina and Alaska. 

Can you stand your neighbors? Increasingly, the answer depends on what their politics are. We are moving away from people who disagree with us, and National Review writer David French says we're headed for a "national divorce." French says, "Americans tend to belong to their political tribe not so much because they love its ideas but rather because they despise their opponents." So we've decided to bring in guests who are close friends and political opposites. How do they maintain friendships? What can we learn from that?

Our guests:

  • Ernie Orlando, 8th grade social studies teacher at Churchville-Chili Schools
  • Joe Randise, IT manager
  • Tom Proietti, resident media scholar at St. John Fisher College
  • Tony Conte, professor of accounting at Monroe Community College

Amazon is bidding to swallow up Whole Foods, which has already inspired a slew of commentary about how the world is changing. Are we going to order all of our food online? Is this good for customers? Is it bad for the minimum wage?

Progressive writer Matt Stoller says that "this merger should frighten all of us." He says that concentrated corporate power can become a political weapon, and consumers -- and workers -- lose. Our guests:

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The latest on the Lake Ontario flooding from our reporters along the lakeshore

News from NPR

An eight-hour cease-fire declared by the Philippine military ended abruptly on Sunday. As soon as the "humanitarian pause" reached its designated end, though, Marawi descended back into the gunfire that has pervaded the southern city for more than a month.

Will arming teachers make schools safer? While that debate continues across the country, this week more than a dozen school employees from around Colorado spent three days learning advanced gun skills at a shooting range outside of Denver.

With 2,500 inmates, the penitentiary institution of Fresnes, about 20 miles south of Paris, is one of the largest prisons in Europe. Like most French prisons, Fresnes is overcrowded. Built in the late 19th century, its tiny cells, each meant for one prisoner, most often house three.

Inmates scream curses and catcalls from their barred windows as I visit a small, empty sports yard ensconced between cell blocks. Plastic bags and punctured soccer balls are caught in the surrounding concertina wire.

Ernest Littlebird put his grill out on the side of Route 39 in Lame Deer, Mont., under the shade of a tree and started grilling hamburgers.

"Come get a dollar burger," he says. "Good meal, you know, something to put in the belly at least."

Littlebird is an entrepreneur. This is his second year selling dollar hamburgers out of his minivan when he couldn't find other work. Jobs are scarce here on the Northern Cheyenne Reservation and so is money.

But Littlebird thinks they don't have to be.

More news from NPR

From the Inclusion Desk

Scott Pitoniak

Children from across the greater Rochester area poured onto Frontier Field Saturday for the 25th annual Challenger Baseball Little League World Series.

The league enables kids ages 6 to 18 who have mental and physical disabilities to play the game with the help of on-field buddies – other children and adults who guide them at bat, around the bases, and in the outfield.

Click on the LISTEN link above to learn more about how the league and World Series were started and about the players who look forward to participating every summer.

There's a lot going on in the local autism community: The U of R has the brand-new Levine Autism Clinic. On South Avenue, there are plans for the new Golisano Autism Center. And this weekend, national experts will be in town to give talks, run workshops, and help lead a conference on autism. So what does the latest research tell us? Our guests:

  • Suzannah Iadarola, Ph.D., assistant professor of pediatrics at UR Medicine’s Golisano Children’s Hospital
  • Chris Hilton, mother, and finance and operations director for AutismUp
  • Terrie Meyn, COO of CP Rochester

This conversation is part of WXXI’s Inclusion Desk, spotlighting issues related to disabilities. The WXXI Inclusion Desk is part of Move to Include — a partnership to encourage thoughtful discussion about issues of inclusion and the differently-abled.

Randy Gorbman / WXXI News

Area law enforcement agencies joined dozens of Special Olympics athletes on Friday for a torch run from Gates Town Hall to Downtown Rochester.

The event raises money for Special Olympics, and that’s something that participants like Kenny Moriarty of Rochester really appreciate.

“It’s incredible, the flames and the running, you’re doing the exercise.” Moriarty also told WXXI News he really appreciates “the sponsors and all the thanks and all the help we get.”

The repeal of the Affordable Care Act could have some unintended consequences on the most vulnerable: children with disabilities. On this special Move to Include edition of Need to Know we’ll learn how special education in our public schools may see unbearable funding cuts.

Also on the show, some local disability rights advocates were recently detained outside the White House. We’ll discuss what they’re calling on President Trump to do and if he’s responded.

And a complex journey for a local artist unfolds on canvas. How local talent is awakening our understanding of deaf culture through art.

Move to Include and the Inclusion Desk is a partnership between WXXI and the Golisano Foundation designed to promote inclusion for people with intellectual and physical disabilities.

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

Rochester: Hub For Photonics

What is photonics and why is it coming to Rochester?

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