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Community groups use Earth Day to bring attention to Parcel 5 and other issues

A performing arts center and residential complex that has been proposed for a key piece of land in downtown Rochester continues to generate a lot of discussion. People from a number of groups gathered at the Parcel 5 site off Main Street on Sunday to make sure their voices are heard. They gathered on Earth Day, and that was appropriate since a number of environmental activists are also part of a group called the Our Land Roc Coalition . The organization says it is advocating for land use...

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What's the ripple effect of the opioid crisis?

WXXI News looks at the people, places, and issues indirectly affected by the opioid crisis

The owners of Mario’s restaurant on Monroe Avenue say they will be bringing back that eatery, but at a different location.

They say that after almost 3 years since the last meal was served on Monroe Avenue, they will open a restaurant in the space now occupied by their current Bazil Restaurant on Irondequoit Bay.

The new restaurant is called Mario’s Homemade Pasta Kitchen, and Mario Daniele says it hearkens back to his roots of growing up in Italy eating in his mother’s kitchen.

Photo City

First hour: Parliament of World Religions

Second hour: New documentary highlights Rochester as a "Photo City"

flickr.com/Esther https://tinyurl.com/y9ny93bb

Among those remembering former first lady Barbara Bush following her death Tuesday is Curt Smith, a senior lecturer in English at the University of Rochester.

Smith was a speechwriter for President George H.W. Bush. He remembers Barbara Bush's fierce protectiveness and loyalty to her husband, her frank conversational style, and her political independence. 

Bush died at her home in Houston Tuesday at the age of 92. 

Click on the LISTEN link above to hear a portion of an interview with Curt Smith.

Former Syracuse Mayor Stephanie Miner says she’s considering a run for governor. The Democrat has never shied away from challenging her own party, including incumbent governor Andrew Cuomo.

We talk to her about why she is leaning toward a gubernatorial campaign, and which issues matter most to her.

The New York Wine and Culinary Center in Canandaigua has a new name.  It is now called  New York Kitchen.

General Manager Bethany DiSanto says the idea is for the branding to more accurately reflect the many foods and beverages that the facility will be talking about.

She says when they first began a dozen years ago, wine was a larger percentage of the beverages talked about at the center, but with the explosion in the number of breweries, as well as homegrown food choices, it was time to come up with a different name.

Updated at 9 a.m. ET

CIA Director Mike Pompeo made a secret visit to North Korea earlier this month and met with leader Kim Jong Un — a meeting that "went very smoothly," President Trump said on Wednesday.

"A good relationship was formed," Trump said, adding that the direct contact with North Korea — a rare step for the U.S. — was intended to work out details of a possible Trump-Kim summit.

There is some relief coming for drivers who use a stretch of the Lake Ontario State Parkway between Hamlin and Kendall.

The NYS Department of Transportation says that construction has begun on a $5.2 million paving project to rehabilitate nearly 30 lane miles of the road between Routes 19 in Monroe County and Route 237 in Orleans County.

Officials say the project will significantly improve pavement conditions with resurfacing of the highway both east and westbound. Acting NYS DOT Commissioner Paul Karas says the work is beginning nearly one month earlier than anticipated.

Updated at 10:23 p.m. ET

Former first lady Barbara Bush died Tuesday at the age of 92, according to a family spokesman.

A statement issued on Sunday by the office of former President George H.W. Bush said that Bush had elected to receive "comfort care" over additional medical treatment after a series of hospitalizations.

Scott Fybush / WXXI News

A controversial panel at the Dentzel Carousel in Ontario Beach Park will soon be replaced by a new image featuring a black panther.

Rochester City officials joined with the Rochester Museum and Science Center and leaders of the "Take it Down" campaign on Tuesday  to announce a contest to create a new painting. It will replace a panel with racist imagery that was removed two years ago.

Every weekday for more than three decades, his baritone steadied our mornings. Even in moments of chaos and crisis, Carl Kasell brought unflappable authority to the news. But behind that hid a lively sense of humor, revealed to listeners late in his career, when he became the beloved judge and official scorekeeper for Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me! NPR's news quiz show.

Kasell died Tuesday from complications from Alzheimer's disease in Potomac, Md. He was 84.

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News from NPR

A new exhibit that opens Monday at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum aims to honor a founding mission.

Five years in the making, "Americans and the Holocaust" contextualizes attitudes in the U.S. during 1930s and '40s persecution and mass murder of Jews in Europe.

Twenty-five years ago, when the building opened, noted Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel introduced the museum not as an answer to the horrors of genocide, but to pose a glaring question: How could this happen?

"I'm not a hero. I'm just a regular person," said James Shaw Jr., who police say saved lives by disarming a man who opened fire Sunday at a Waffle House in Tennessee. Shaw insists he acted only to save himself — but many others are calling him a hero for stopping the violence.

"I think anybody could've did what I did if they're just pushed in that kind of cage," Shaw said, "and you have to either react or you're going to, you know, fold."

Since long before anyone can remember, the big, fertile slopes of the Alazani Valley in eastern Georgia have been planted with grape vines. It's the heartland of wine-making in the country that invented it 8,000 years ago. But in recent months, the valley has been going through a new kind of ferment, because of bitcoin.

Long before it lands on a restaurant menu, Chilean sea bass takes quite a journey to arrive on land. To catch these deep-sea dwellers, fishers usually drag nets along the ocean floor a quarter of a mile, or more, beneath the ocean's surface — a form of fishing called bottom trawling.

The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization tries to keep tabs on bottom trawling, which rakes in juvenile fish and lots of other ocean species that are not the desired catch, depleting future fish stocks. It asks member countries to adhere to quotas and report fishing statistics.

More news from NPR

From the Inclusion Desk

The Challenger Miracle Field of Greater Rochester has received a significant grant from the Ralph C. Wilson Foundation.

Just over $487,000 will go towards the construction and operation of their inclusive complex in Webster, which makes sports more accessible for children with disabilities.

President of the Board of Directors for Challenger Miracle Field, Ron Kampff says part of that money will go towards phase two of the field’s buildout.

Musician redefines herself after hearing loss

Apr 4, 2018
Photo Credit: Eastman School of Music

Gaelen McCormick has been losing her hearing, to varying degrees over several years as a result of Ménière’s disease – a condition that also causes vertigo and tinnitus.

"My husband and I have a morning ritual. Wake up, and the first thing he says, is “I love you” and the next thing I can say is “I can hear you” or “I can’t hear you” – and that’s how we start our day." 

The loss of hearing was a particular challenge for McCormick because of her profession: she is a musician.

AutismUp.org

April is Autism Awareness and Acceptance Month. A local advocate says most people are aware of the condition, with one in 68 children getting the diagnosis.

But Rachel Rosner, director of education for AutismUp, says there's still room for improvement on the acceptance part.

Rosner hopes people can move closer to understanding and respecting the rights of those on the autism spectrum to live and thrive in their communities.

For 10 years Rochester has joined communities around the country to help do one thing: put an end to a word individuals with disabilities call offensive and derogatory - the R-word - meaning “retard” or “retarded.” It’s all part of an initiative spearheaded by the Golisano Foundation called: Spread the Word to End the Word. It’s linked to a national campaign launched by Special Olympics and Best Buddies. On this edition of Need to Know, we discuss the damaging impact of a word gone wrong.

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

Rochester: Hub For Photonics

What is photonics and why is it coming to Rochester?

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