WXXI AM News

Top Stories

Trump Says He Will Walk Out If North Korea Meeting Not 'Fruitful'

Updated at 7:50 p.m. ET President Trump said he would walk away from a planned meeting with North Korea's leader, Kim Jong Un, if it looked like the two sides were not going to be able to reach a deal. "If we don't think it's going to be successful ... we won't have it," Trump said at a joint press conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe Wednesday at Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort. "If the meeting when I'm there is not fruitful, I will respectfully leave the meeting." "I like always...

Read More

What's the ripple effect of the opioid crisis?

WXXI News looks at the people, places, and issues indirectly affected by the opioid crisis

Rochester NY – Workplaces around America are worried about violent outbreaks following incidents like the recent fatal shooting at a truck engine plant outside of Chicago.

Rochester, NY – There are several developments today involving Eastman Kodak Company.

The picture company has unveiled a new device at the Demo 2001 high tech conference in Phoenix, Arizona. It's a combination MP3 music player and digital camera that will sell for less than 300 dollars.

Kodak is targeting its "MC3" device at "generation Y." Those are people born between 1979 and 1994, who are comfortable with the Internet and using it to send music and pictures.

Rochester, NY – An appeals court ruling says Betty Tyson can't sue the state of New York for wrongful imprisonment.

Tyson spent nearly 25 years in prison on a 1973 Rochester murder conviction. She became the state's longest-serving female inmate.

Her conviction was overturned in 1998 after a judge ruled that evidence in her favor had been wrongly surpressed from her original trial. The district attorney's office -- which had turned up the evidence -- declined to try her again.

Rochester, NY – A Rochester-area state senator is amending legislation to expand the so-called "Son of Sam" law -- in light of reports that an inmate at the Elmira Correctional Facility made nearly $1 million by investing in the stock market.

Republican Michael Nozzolio of Seneca County says he'll introduce legislation to cofiscate any profits a prisoner makes from "non-sanctioned ventures" while behind bars. Nozzolio would turn the money over to the state Crime Victims Assistance Fund, to be used in aiding crime victims.

Rochester, NY – The new heart transplant program at the University of Rochester Medical Center has performed its first proceedure. The heart transplant was performed early yesterday morning...on a 58 year old Rochester man. Patient David Beatson was the first to be placed on the cardiac transplant list at Strong Memorial Hospital.

He's in stable condition, and doctors say he's doing well.

Rochester, NY – Senator Charles Schumer says the Senate Judiciary Committee heard "devestating testimony" today about the effects of proposed airline mergers on New York.

Schumer is calling on the Justice Department and the White House to block the wave of airline mergers sweeping the industry until the stituation can be studied. Senator Schumer says he plans to talk with Transportation Secretary Norman Minetta to get his point across.

Rochester, NY – The Rochester Institute of Technology has announced plans for a new high-tech college.

R-I-T's eighth college will be a school of Computer and Information Sciences. It will bring together all the high-tech fields already taught at the school into a single discipline.

R-I-T officials have been raising millions of dollars required to add the new college. They believe it will increase enrollment by another one-thousand students.

Rochester, NY – A disability rights advocate wants to work with Amtrak on emergency evacuation for wheelchair users -- after being involved in Monday's train wreck near Syracuse.

Teresa Carroll of Rochester is a quadraplegic who gets around in an electric wheelchair. She's on the board of directors of Rochester's Center for Independent Living.

Seven members of the center were taking the train to a legislative breakfast in Albany. The train had just left Syracuse when it slammed into the rear of a CSX freight train.

Pages

News from NPR

Reducing Voters' Paperwork Might Expand The Voter Rolls

26 minutes ago

Political brawls over voting laws have consumed states across the country for the past decade. But below the surface, a movement to automatically register eligible voters to vote is rapidly gaining traction. By next year, more than a quarter of all Americans will live in states where they no longer have to fill out registration forms in order to cast a ballot.

When Lane Murdock, a high school sophomore, heard that 17 high school students and educators had been killed in a shooting in Parkland, Fla., she says she felt numb.

To her, and so many others, mass shootings can feel all too common in the U.S.

"In the time I've been in high school we've had the Pulse, Las Vegas and now, [the Parkland] shooting," Murdock says.

Most people are familiar with some form of triage: When you go to an emergency room, you first sit down with a triage nurse who records your symptoms, takes your vital signs and assesses the urgency of your medical need.

As of Thursday, that's happening over the phone for 911 callers in Washington, D.C., where triage nurses now sit alongside 911 dispatchers to help field calls.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., may not have any interest in allowing a vote on a measure to make it harder for President Trump to fire special counsel Robert Mueller, but that isn't stopping some Republicans from forcing the debate.

North Carolina Republican Thom Tillis said Wednesday that he will continue working on a bill to allow Mueller access to speedy judicial review if Trump tries to force him out of his job leading the Justice Department investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election — with or without McConnell's support.

More news from NPR

From the Inclusion Desk

The Challenger Miracle Field of Greater Rochester has received a significant grant from the Ralph C. Wilson Foundation.

Just over $487,000 will go towards the construction and operation of their inclusive complex in Webster, which makes sports more accessible for children with disabilities.

President of the Board of Directors for Challenger Miracle Field, Ron Kampff says part of that money will go towards phase two of the field’s buildout.

Musician redefines herself after hearing loss

Apr 4, 2018
Photo Credit: Eastman School of Music

Gaelen McCormick has been losing her hearing, to varying degrees over several years as a result of Ménière’s disease – a condition that also causes vertigo and tinnitus.

"My husband and I have a morning ritual. Wake up, and the first thing he says, is “I love you” and the next thing I can say is “I can hear you” or “I can’t hear you” – and that’s how we start our day." 

The loss of hearing was a particular challenge for McCormick because of her profession: she is a musician.

AutismUp.org

April is Autism Awareness and Acceptance Month. A local advocate says most people are aware of the condition, with one in 68 children getting the diagnosis.

But Rachel Rosner, director of education for AutismUp, says there's still room for improvement on the acceptance part.

Rosner hopes people can move closer to understanding and respecting the rights of those on the autism spectrum to live and thrive in their communities.

For 10 years Rochester has joined communities around the country to help do one thing: put an end to a word individuals with disabilities call offensive and derogatory - the R-word - meaning “retard” or “retarded.” It’s all part of an initiative spearheaded by the Golisano Foundation called: Spread the Word to End the Word. It’s linked to a national campaign launched by Special Olympics and Best Buddies. On this edition of Need to Know, we discuss the damaging impact of a word gone wrong.

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

Rochester: Hub For Photonics

What is photonics and why is it coming to Rochester?

Meet the WXXI News Team

The reporters you hear everyday