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Suspect Allegedly Confessed To Fla. School Shootings That Killed 17

Updated at 7 p.m. ET Court documents say the suspect in the shootings at a South Florida high school has confessed to investigators. Nikolas Cruz, 19, has been booked on 17 charges of premeditated murder at Broward County's Main Jail in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. According to a court filing, "In a post-Miranda statement, Cruz stated that he was the gunman who entered the school campus armed with a AR-15 and began shooting students he saw in the hallways and on the school grounds. Cruz stated that...

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A podcast about growing up and trying to find a place where you belong -- when you've been told your whole life that you're different.

Rochester NY – Workplaces around America are worried about violent outbreaks following incidents like the recent fatal shooting at a truck engine plant outside of Chicago.

Rochester, NY – There are several developments today involving Eastman Kodak Company.

The picture company has unveiled a new device at the Demo 2001 high tech conference in Phoenix, Arizona. It's a combination MP3 music player and digital camera that will sell for less than 300 dollars.

Kodak is targeting its "MC3" device at "generation Y." Those are people born between 1979 and 1994, who are comfortable with the Internet and using it to send music and pictures.

Rochester, NY – An appeals court ruling says Betty Tyson can't sue the state of New York for wrongful imprisonment.

Tyson spent nearly 25 years in prison on a 1973 Rochester murder conviction. She became the state's longest-serving female inmate.

Her conviction was overturned in 1998 after a judge ruled that evidence in her favor had been wrongly surpressed from her original trial. The district attorney's office -- which had turned up the evidence -- declined to try her again.

Rochester, NY – A Rochester-area state senator is amending legislation to expand the so-called "Son of Sam" law -- in light of reports that an inmate at the Elmira Correctional Facility made nearly $1 million by investing in the stock market.

Republican Michael Nozzolio of Seneca County says he'll introduce legislation to cofiscate any profits a prisoner makes from "non-sanctioned ventures" while behind bars. Nozzolio would turn the money over to the state Crime Victims Assistance Fund, to be used in aiding crime victims.

Rochester, NY – The new heart transplant program at the University of Rochester Medical Center has performed its first proceedure. The heart transplant was performed early yesterday morning...on a 58 year old Rochester man. Patient David Beatson was the first to be placed on the cardiac transplant list at Strong Memorial Hospital.

He's in stable condition, and doctors say he's doing well.

Rochester, NY – Senator Charles Schumer says the Senate Judiciary Committee heard "devestating testimony" today about the effects of proposed airline mergers on New York.

Schumer is calling on the Justice Department and the White House to block the wave of airline mergers sweeping the industry until the stituation can be studied. Senator Schumer says he plans to talk with Transportation Secretary Norman Minetta to get his point across.

Rochester, NY – The Rochester Institute of Technology has announced plans for a new high-tech college.

R-I-T's eighth college will be a school of Computer and Information Sciences. It will bring together all the high-tech fields already taught at the school into a single discipline.

R-I-T officials have been raising millions of dollars required to add the new college. They believe it will increase enrollment by another one-thousand students.

Rochester, NY – A disability rights advocate wants to work with Amtrak on emergency evacuation for wheelchair users -- after being involved in Monday's train wreck near Syracuse.

Teresa Carroll of Rochester is a quadraplegic who gets around in an electric wheelchair. She's on the board of directors of Rochester's Center for Independent Living.

Seven members of the center were taking the train to a legislative breakfast in Albany. The train had just left Syracuse when it slammed into the rear of a CSX freight train.

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Coverage of harassment claims against faculty at the University of Rochester

News from NPR

After Elizabeth Moreno had back surgery in late 2015, her surgeon prescribed an opioid painkiller and a follow-up drug test that seemed routine — until the lab slapped her with a bill for $17,850.

A Houston lab had tested her urine sample for a constellation of legal and illicit drugs, many of which Moreno says she had never heard of, let alone taken.

"I was totally confused. I didn't know how I was going to pay this," said Moreno, 30, who is finishing a degree in education at Texas State University in San Marcos, and is pregnant with twins.

In her late 20s and attending college in Texas, Elizabeth Moreno suffered from debilitating back pain caused by a spinal abnormality. "I just could not live with the pain," she says. "I couldn't get dressed by myself, I couldn't walk across my house, let alone to class, and nothing, no drug that had been prescribed to me, even dulled the pain."

Coast Guard Petty officer Jake DiPaola arrived on St. John in the Virgin Islands about a week after Hurricane Maria. In Coral Bay, on the island's eastern end, he says the marina was a mess.

"There were two sailboats right here," he says, while standing on the water's edge. "The mangroves across the water were shoulder-to-shoulder sailboats completely. And all of those got hauled out."

NPR and Kaiser Health News are undertaking a project to investigate and dissect real-life medical bills.

We expect that examining the bills will shed light on the often surprising prices for health care in the U.S.

Along the way, we're hoping to help people learn how to be more active and successful in managing the costs of their care.

Do you have a medical bill or explanation of benefits that you'd like us to see and scrutinize? Submit it here and tell us the story behind it.

We may use it, with your permission, in one of our monthly features.

More news from NPR

From the Inclusion Desk

AutismUp and the Jewish Federation of Greater Rochester are combining forces to provide support for families of individuals with autism or other developmental and intellectual disabilities.

The two organizations are launching a service to connect families with the support and services they will need following a diagnosis.

Classically trained violinist and songwriter Gaelynn Lea has been immersed in music since her childhood. While she says her primary focus in life is on her career as a musician, it was her rise to fame after winning the 2016 NPR Tiny Desk contest when she also took on a new role - that of a disability advocate and public speaker.  During a recent concert in Rochester at Nazareth College, Lea told Need to Know that the underrepresentation of people with disabilities in the arts has given her a new stage to share a powerful message.

We conclude our Dialogue on Disability Week with a conversation about "invisible" disabilities. Our guests share the challenges they face living with multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. In studio:

freeimages.com/Jos van Galen

Some 2,000 Rochester area residents with disabilities are in need of housing.

And that number only reflects individuals who get services through one state agency, the New York State Office of People With Developmental Disabilities.  The overall need for affordable, accessible housing is even greater.

This has always been an issue, but it's become a bigger problem in recent years, as more people are interested in living independently.

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

Rochester: Hub For Photonics

What is photonics and why is it coming to Rochester?

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