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Poll finds NYers pessimistic on race, sexual harassment

A poll on New Yorkers' attitudes on racism and sexual harassment show that many believe society has a way to go to improve things. The Siena College survey finds that 36 percent of women report being the victims of workplace sexual harassment. Siena spokesman Steve Greenberg said that when it comes to the issue, there is no upstate-downstate divide or difference in political parties, and three-quarters of New Yorkers think it’s a significant problem. “Those are just staggering numbers,”...

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Rochester, NY – The new heart transplant program at the University of Rochester Medical Center has performed its first proceedure. The heart transplant was performed early yesterday morning...on a 58 year old Rochester man. Patient David Beatson was the first to be placed on the cardiac transplant list at Strong Memorial Hospital.

He's in stable condition, and doctors say he's doing well.

Rochester, NY – Senator Charles Schumer says the Senate Judiciary Committee heard "devestating testimony" today about the effects of proposed airline mergers on New York.

Schumer is calling on the Justice Department and the White House to block the wave of airline mergers sweeping the industry until the stituation can be studied. Senator Schumer says he plans to talk with Transportation Secretary Norman Minetta to get his point across.

Rochester, NY – The Rochester Institute of Technology has announced plans for a new high-tech college.

R-I-T's eighth college will be a school of Computer and Information Sciences. It will bring together all the high-tech fields already taught at the school into a single discipline.

R-I-T officials have been raising millions of dollars required to add the new college. They believe it will increase enrollment by another one-thousand students.

Rochester, NY – A disability rights advocate wants to work with Amtrak on emergency evacuation for wheelchair users -- after being involved in Monday's train wreck near Syracuse.

Teresa Carroll of Rochester is a quadraplegic who gets around in an electric wheelchair. She's on the board of directors of Rochester's Center for Independent Living.

Seven members of the center were taking the train to a legislative breakfast in Albany. The train had just left Syracuse when it slammed into the rear of a CSX freight train.

Rochester NY – The American Classical Music Hall of Fame is honoring the founder of the Eastman Wind Ensemble. Frederick Fennell has been selected as one of this year's inductees. The director of the Eastman School of Music calls Fennell " a music legend". The induction ceremony will take place April 21st in Cincinnati Ohio.

    Rochester NY – The University of Rochester Medical Center will receive over one million dollars from the American Cancer Society. The grant will go towards helping medical researchers understand the cause of nausea from chemotherapy. Nausea is one of the most serious side effects from undergoing chemotheraphy treatment for cancer.Scientists have recently developed new drugs that better control vomiting. But they are not as effective when it comes to reducing nausea.

      Rochester NY – 116 acres of land in Monroe and Livingston Counties have been purchased by the State of New York. The purchase includes 68 acres of Burger Park in the town of Greece. And 48 acres of land on Conesus Lake in the town of Conesus.Conservationists are happy with the State's decision because it will allow more land to be preserved not only for wildlife. But also for residents who enjoy the outdoors and recreational sports like fishing.It will cost the State $670,000 to purchase the 116 acres of property in both counties.

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        Coverage of harassment claims against faculty at the University of Rochester

        News from NPR

        Updated at 4:10 a.m. ET

        Pope Francis has arrived in Chile to begin a three-day visit, but the Argentinian-born pontiff is likely to receive a less-than-warm reception from a country still reeling from the repercussions of a local priest-abuse scandal.

        Grammy Award-winning singer Edwin Hawkins died on Monday at his home in Pleasanton, Calif.

        His publicist Bill Carpenter told news organizations that the cause was pancreatic cancer. Hawkins was 74.

        A native of Oakland, Hawkins had been performing with his family and in church groups since he was a boy.

        In the late 1960s, when Hawkins was in his 20s, he helped form the Northern California State Youth Choir.

        The group recorded its first album, Let Us Go Into the House of the Lord.

        A Southern California couple are in custody after one of their daughters contacted 911 and led authorities to their home and 12 of her siblings, including "several children shackled to their beds with chains and padlocks in dark and foul-smelling surroundings."

        The discovery in Perris, Calif., came after the 17-year-old daughter — who police described as emaciated and appearing to be just 10 — escaped the home of her parents, David Allen Turpin, 57, and Louise Anna Turpin, 49, and called police with a cell phone she found at the residence.

        Our airwaves are filled with debates about immigrants and refugees. Who should be in the United States, who shouldn't, and who should decide?

        These modern debates often draw upon our ideas about past waves of immigration. We sometimes assume that earlier generations of newcomers quickly learned English and integrated into American society. But historian Maria Cristina Garcia says these ideas are often false.

        More news from NPR

        From the Inclusion Desk

        Classically trained violinist and songwriter Gaelynn Lea has been immersed in music since her childhood. While she says her primary focus in life is on her career as a musician, it was her rise to fame after winning the 2016 NPR Tiny Desk contest when she also took on a new role - that of a disability advocate and public speaker.  During a recent concert in Rochester at Nazareth College, Lea told Need to Know that the underrepresentation of people with disabilities in the arts has given her a new stage to share a powerful message.

        We conclude our Dialogue on Disability Week with a conversation about "invisible" disabilities. Our guests share the challenges they face living with multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. In studio:

        freeimages.com/Jos van Galen

        Some 2,000 Rochester area residents with disabilities are in need of housing.

        And that number only reflects individuals who get services through one state agency, the New York State Office of People With Developmental Disabilities.  The overall need for affordable, accessible housing is even greater.

        This has always been an issue, but it's become a bigger problem in recent years, as more people are interested in living independently.

        Our Dialogue on Disability Week continues with a conversation about adaptive sports. According to the CDC, nearly half of adults with disabilities ages 18 to 64 do not get aerobic physical activity. Local organizations are helping to change that by offering opportunities in adaptive sports.

        We hear the stories of local athletes in those programs. Our guests:

        • Michael Cocquyt, supervisor of SportsNet
        • Jen Truscott, alpine skier
        • David Grace, sled hockey athlete, who participates in many winter sports

        More stories from the Inclusion Desk

        Rochester: Hub For Photonics

        What is photonics and why is it coming to Rochester?

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