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Rochester Rhinos need $1.3 million to play in 2018

$1.3 million in two weeks. That's what the Rochester Rhinos say they need to raise in order to secure a 2018 season. Owners Wendy and David Dworkin passionately asked the community to engage and support the beloved team in order to keep them around. An emotional speech came from Chief Soccer Officer and former head coach Pat Ercoli as well. "Professional sports teams bring a great deal to the quality of life of a city that traveling art exhibits and Broadway shows just can't. A sports team...

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Rochester, NY – The unlicensed driver who struck and severely injured a Rochester police officer when he suffered a seizure behind the wheel will serve 18 years in prison.

Ed Jones of Rochester was driving a car that clipped Officer Scott McLaughlin at the corner of Main Street and Clinton Avenue. McLaughlin was tossed through the air and suffered severe injuries that left him in a coma. The officer is recovering, but still suffers health problems and hasn't been able to return to work.

Rochester NY – Starting February 5th, Planned Parenthood of the Rochester/Syracuse Region will offer the option of medical abortion by the use of the pill known as RU-486.Planned Parenthood President and CEO Carol Love said medical abortion will give women an alternative to surgical abortion.

    Rochester NY – State Assemblyman David Koon said school districts in the 135th Assembly district would lose $ 8.3 million dollars under Governor Pataki's proposed budget. The Penfield School District would take the biggest hit, losing over $2.5 million. Other school districts losing state funding according to Assemblyman Koon includes : Fairport $1.7 million. Webster $1.6 million. Pittsford $1.3 million. East Rochester would lose over $660,000 and Victor would lose $350,000 in state funding.

      Rochester NY – The Rochester Area Community Foundation received a $12.3 million dollar gift from the estate of Nettie Bullis. This is the largest estate gift ever received by the Community Foundation. The money will go towards educational and charitable activities in the Town of Macedon and Wayne County where Bullis grew up.A note of local history : Nettie Bullis's Grandfather was a cousin of Susan B. Anthony.

        Rochester NY – A Steuben County woman was charged with bilking medicaid out of $100,000 by running an illegal private duty nursing service out of her home. Ann Weaver Filkins, from the town of Pulteney, pleaded guilty to charges of Grand Larceny. And promised to make restitution. Filkins is scheduled to be sentenced March 12th. She could face four years in prison.According to the State Attorney General's office, Filkins submitted a number of reimbursement claims from November, 1997 to July 1999.

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          News from NPR

          Passengers on a morning train on the Tokyo region's Tsukuba Express line might not have noticed anything was amiss Tuesday. But when their train left Minami-Nagareyama station, it did so 20 seconds ahead of schedule — and when the company noticed, it issued an apology to customers.

          The train was traveling northbound on the line that connects Tokyo's Akihabara station with Tsukuba to the northeast — a trip that takes less than an hour. After passengers had boarded, the crew didn't check the time, resulting in the slightly early departure "around" 9:44 a.m., the company said.

          In the east-Bohemian city of Havlíčkův Brod, two hours by train from Prague, the Potato Research Institute is caught in the crosshairs of time.

          This week, another big name in tech was toppled by accusations of sexual harassment — venture capitalist Steve Jurvetson, an investor in Tesla and SpaceX who left his prominent Silicon Valley company.

          The big-money world of Silicon Valley remains dominated by men and remains a hard place for women to speak out if they want to join the ranks of its richest. And some women think the best way to fight harassment is to tread carefully and get to the top.

          The World Anti-Doping Agency says that Russia's official sports drug-testing lab, which was suspended in 2015 following evidence of state-sponsored doping, remains "non-compliant."

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          From the Inclusion Desk

          Caitlin Whyte / WXXI News

          The benefits of music on individuals with autism are widely known. Improved focus, advances in speech and language, and better motor skills. But sometimes it’s about the growth that you can’t quantify in numbers.

          On a Tuesday night in a sleepy plaza in Penfield, the Music Education Center is buzzing. Kids are in the waiting room, parents are catching up and students are practicing anything from trombone to piano.

          Noah Svokos is a curly haired 13 year old who has been taking piano lessons for 5 years at the center.

          NPR.org

          NPR's 2016 Tiny Desk Contest Winner Gaelynn Lea is in Rochester this weekend for a performance at Nazareth College Saturday.

          She never thought she would be a performer full time. Which is a funny thought to come from someone who in the last year had 200 shows in 39 states and 6 different countries.

          Born with Brittle Bone Disease, Lea is a violin player but also uses the platform she’s been given to talk about disability rights.

          An emerging model called self-direction is enabling people with disabilities to live more independent lives. Self-directed individuals choose where they live, they design their own days and activities, and they have more control over the funding they receive for daily support services.

          While the model has produced positive results for people in our community, advocates say not everyone knows about it or understands the process well. We discuss what self-direction means, and we hear from people in our community who are navigating the process. Our guests:

          The winner of NPR's 2016 Tiny Desk Concert is a remarkable musician from Duluth, Minnesota named Gaelynn Lea. Lea is a classically trained fiddler whose music includes Celtic and American fiddle traditions. Her submission, Someday We'll Linger in the Sun, was the judges' unanimous choice. If you watch Lea's video, you'll notice that she plays her violin in a style that you might not expect -- she holds it in front of herself, like a cello.

          Lea has brittle bone disease, and when she fell in love with the cello as a young student, it was difficult for her to hold it. A teacher noticed, was inspired by Lea's gift for music, and helped her learn how to play the violin in the same style. Now, Lea plays solo shows and with her band. She's also a teacher and an advocate for people with disabilities. 

          We talk to Lea about her music, her success, and about how to make all stages accessible to everyone.  She'll be in Rochester for a performance and talk at Nazareth College, but first, she joins us on Connections. Our guests:

          More stories from the Inclusion Desk

          Rochester: Hub For Photonics

          What is photonics and why is it coming to Rochester?

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