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Arrests made in vandalism of veterans memorial

The Monroe County Sheriff's Department is announcing the arrest of two men in connection with the vandalizing of the bronze memorial sculpture at the VFW Post 8495 in Fairport. 22 year old 22-year old Rhys Baetzhold of Pittsford and 18-year old Anthony Fennell of Perinton face felony grand larceny and criminal mischief charges, along with a misdemeanor conspiracy charge. Undersheriff Drew Forsythe says Deputy Clay Hilliger had spotted Baetzhold, someone he suspected of being involved in other...

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Rochester NY – State Assemblyman David Koon said school districts in the 135th Assembly district would lose $ 8.3 million dollars under Governor Pataki's proposed budget. The Penfield School District would take the biggest hit, losing over $2.5 million. Other school districts losing state funding according to Assemblyman Koon includes : Fairport $1.7 million. Webster $1.6 million. Pittsford $1.3 million. East Rochester would lose over $660,000 and Victor would lose $350,000 in state funding.

    Rochester NY – The Rochester Area Community Foundation received a $12.3 million dollar gift from the estate of Nettie Bullis. This is the largest estate gift ever received by the Community Foundation. The money will go towards educational and charitable activities in the Town of Macedon and Wayne County where Bullis grew up.A note of local history : Nettie Bullis's Grandfather was a cousin of Susan B. Anthony.

      Rochester NY – A Steuben County woman was charged with bilking medicaid out of $100,000 by running an illegal private duty nursing service out of her home. Ann Weaver Filkins, from the town of Pulteney, pleaded guilty to charges of Grand Larceny. And promised to make restitution. Filkins is scheduled to be sentenced March 12th. She could face four years in prison.According to the State Attorney General's office, Filkins submitted a number of reimbursement claims from November, 1997 to July 1999.

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        State Police Completes Rape Investigation

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        If you're poor, uninsured and have a bad car wreck or fall seriously ill, there's a chance in most states to enroll for Medicaid after the fact. If you qualify for Medicaid, the program will pay your medical bills going back three months.

        This "retroactive eligibility" provides financial protection as patients await approval of their Medicaid applications. It protects hospitals, too, from having to absorb the costs of caring for these patients.

        Bowing to pressure from the U.S. Justice Department, the production company behind media outlet RT America registered as a foreign agent on Monday. Russian leaders are criticizing the move, and lawmakers in Moscow are preparing a "symmetric legislative response," according to the state-run Tass news agency.

        In the filing, RT America's partner company said it wasn't sure how much of its funding comes from the Russian Federation. The media operation had faced a Nov. 13 deadline to register that was set by the U.S. government.

        Updated at 12:01 p.m. ET

        Attorney General Jeff Sessions told the House Judiciary Committee Tuesday that his "story has never changed" about his and other Trump campaign officials' connections to Russia.

        "I will not accept, and reject accusations that I have ever lied," Sessions said. "That is a lie!"

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        From the Inclusion Desk

        Caitlin Whyte / WXXI News

        The benefits of music on individuals with autism are widely known. Improved focus, advances in speech and language, and better motor skills. But sometimes it’s about the growth that you can’t quantify in numbers.

        On a Tuesday night in a sleepy plaza in Penfield, the Music Education Center is buzzing. Kids are in the waiting room, parents are catching up and students are practicing anything from trombone to piano.

        Noah Svokos is a curly haired 13 year old who has been taking piano lessons for 5 years at the center.

        NPR.org

        NPR's 2016 Tiny Desk Contest Winner Gaelynn Lea is in Rochester this weekend for a performance at Nazareth College Saturday.

        She never thought she would be a performer full time. Which is a funny thought to come from someone who in the last year had 200 shows in 39 states and 6 different countries.

        Born with Brittle Bone Disease, Lea is a violin player but also uses the platform she’s been given to talk about disability rights.

        An emerging model called self-direction is enabling people with disabilities to live more independent lives. Self-directed individuals choose where they live, they design their own days and activities, and they have more control over the funding they receive for daily support services.

        While the model has produced positive results for people in our community, advocates say not everyone knows about it or understands the process well. We discuss what self-direction means, and we hear from people in our community who are navigating the process. Our guests:

        The winner of NPR's 2016 Tiny Desk Concert is a remarkable musician from Duluth, Minnesota named Gaelynn Lea. Lea is a classically trained fiddler whose music includes Celtic and American fiddle traditions. Her submission, Someday We'll Linger in the Sun, was the judges' unanimous choice. If you watch Lea's video, you'll notice that she plays her violin in a style that you might not expect -- she holds it in front of herself, like a cello.

        Lea has brittle bone disease, and when she fell in love with the cello as a young student, it was difficult for her to hold it. A teacher noticed, was inspired by Lea's gift for music, and helped her learn how to play the violin in the same style. Now, Lea plays solo shows and with her band. She's also a teacher and an advocate for people with disabilities. 

        We talk to Lea about her music, her success, and about how to make all stages accessible to everyone.  She'll be in Rochester for a performance and talk at Nazareth College, but first, she joins us on Connections. Our guests:

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