WXXI AM News

Top Stories

Trump's Message For His 1st U.N. General Assembly: Strength, 'Reform'

President Trump is about to make his debut at an institution he has often berated. For the first time, he will attend the annual United Nations General Assembly in New York, which brings together leaders of the 193 member nations for a week of meetings and speeches. As president-elect, he called the U.N. "just a club for people to get together, talk and have a good time." But it's a "new day" at the U.N., said U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley. "The U.N. has shifted over the...

Read More

Rochester, NY – There are several developments today involving Eastman Kodak Company.

The picture company has unveiled a new device at the Demo 2001 high tech conference in Phoenix, Arizona. It's a combination MP3 music player and digital camera that will sell for less than 300 dollars.

Kodak is targeting its "MC3" device at "generation Y." Those are people born between 1979 and 1994, who are comfortable with the Internet and using it to send music and pictures.

Rochester, NY – An appeals court ruling says Betty Tyson can't sue the state of New York for wrongful imprisonment.

Tyson spent nearly 25 years in prison on a 1973 Rochester murder conviction. She became the state's longest-serving female inmate.

Her conviction was overturned in 1998 after a judge ruled that evidence in her favor had been wrongly surpressed from her original trial. The district attorney's office -- which had turned up the evidence -- declined to try her again.

Rochester, NY – A Rochester-area state senator is amending legislation to expand the so-called "Son of Sam" law -- in light of reports that an inmate at the Elmira Correctional Facility made nearly $1 million by investing in the stock market.

Republican Michael Nozzolio of Seneca County says he'll introduce legislation to cofiscate any profits a prisoner makes from "non-sanctioned ventures" while behind bars. Nozzolio would turn the money over to the state Crime Victims Assistance Fund, to be used in aiding crime victims.

Rochester, NY – The new heart transplant program at the University of Rochester Medical Center has performed its first proceedure. The heart transplant was performed early yesterday morning...on a 58 year old Rochester man. Patient David Beatson was the first to be placed on the cardiac transplant list at Strong Memorial Hospital.

He's in stable condition, and doctors say he's doing well.

Rochester, NY – Senator Charles Schumer says the Senate Judiciary Committee heard "devestating testimony" today about the effects of proposed airline mergers on New York.

Schumer is calling on the Justice Department and the White House to block the wave of airline mergers sweeping the industry until the stituation can be studied. Senator Schumer says he plans to talk with Transportation Secretary Norman Minetta to get his point across.

Rochester, NY – The Rochester Institute of Technology has announced plans for a new high-tech college.

R-I-T's eighth college will be a school of Computer and Information Sciences. It will bring together all the high-tech fields already taught at the school into a single discipline.

R-I-T officials have been raising millions of dollars required to add the new college. They believe it will increase enrollment by another one-thousand students.

Rochester, NY – A disability rights advocate wants to work with Amtrak on emergency evacuation for wheelchair users -- after being involved in Monday's train wreck near Syracuse.

Teresa Carroll of Rochester is a quadraplegic who gets around in an electric wheelchair. She's on the board of directors of Rochester's Center for Independent Living.

Seven members of the center were taking the train to a legislative breakfast in Albany. The train had just left Syracuse when it slammed into the rear of a CSX freight train.

Rochester NY – The American Classical Music Hall of Fame is honoring the founder of the Eastman Wind Ensemble. Frederick Fennell has been selected as one of this year's inductees. The director of the Eastman School of Music calls Fennell " a music legend". The induction ceremony will take place April 21st in Cincinnati Ohio.

    Pages

    Stories from those who experienced the era

    News from NPR

    Editor's note: Language featured in this piece may be considered offensive to some.

    With the police shooting of Michael Brown in 2014, "Ferguson" became shorthand for racial strife and police shootings of unarmed black men.

    But years before the protests and chants of "Hands up, don't shoot," there was something amiss in the Ferguson, Mo., police department.

    Before Michael Brown, there was Fred Watson.

    Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

    MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

    Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

    MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

    Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

    MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

    More news from NPR

    From the Inclusion Desk

    Rosalie Winard

    A woman who helped shine the light on the unique abilities of an autistic mind will be inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame in Seneca Falls next week.

    Temple Grandin, an author, speaker, and champion of farm animal welfare said the honor means a lot to her.

    "Because when I first started in the seventies,” she said, “being a woman in a man's industry - the cattle industry - that was hard and I had to prove that I could do it. I was really motivated to make sure that my stuff was really good and that I wasn't stupid." 

    When a member of your family is in a wheelchair you may not think taking off on a kayaking adventure together on the Erie Canal is possible. However, it is. On this Need to Know segment we join in on the experience with an area mother and son sharing this special moment together for the first time through Rochester Accessible Adventures. We also learn about the work being done by RAA in an effort to revolutionize inclusion when it comes to eliminating barriers to active lifestyles for individuals with disabilities and their families. 

    A living wage. That’s what a coalition of advocates and community agencies that support individuals with disabilities have been calling for in our state. The focus of that fight - the more than 120,000 New Yorkers who work with and care for individuals with disabilities. They’re called Direct Support Professionals (DSPs) and according to the New York State Chapter of the Arc they’re in chronic short supply While the governor allocated $55 million in the budget this year to support a wage increase for these professionals working with nonprofits - is that enough to recruit, train and sustain employees? We examine the current state of DSPs and the challenges they’re continuing to face on this Move to Include edition of Need to Know.

    A hard-fought wage increase battle saw some success this year. But workers who help those living with disabilities say they are still in need of support. On this edition of Need to Know we’ll discuss what a profession that some call underpaid and undervalued is looking for in an effort to help our most vulnerable and those trained to care for them.

    Also on the show, a revolution in inclusion. We’re checking out a local group on a mission to get businesses and organizations equipped to offer recreational activities to people of all abilities.

    More stories from the Inclusion Desk

    Rochester: Hub For Photonics

    What is photonics and why is it coming to Rochester?

    Meet the WXXI News Team

    The reporters you hear everyday