WXXI AM News

Top Stories

Irma Weakens To Tropical Depression As Storm Buffets Georgia

Updated at 11:50 p.m. ET Irma, once a powerful and longrunning hurricane, weakened to a tropical depression as it moved through Georgia on its way to Alabama. It continues to dump heavy rain but all surge warnings have been canceled. Irma has left behind dangerous floodwaters, power outages for millions of people and the debris it has made of human possessions across Florida. The huge storm remained a Category 1 hurricane through early Monday, before finally being downgraded to a tropical...

Read More

Rochester NY – A Steuben County woman was charged with bilking medicaid out of $100,000 by running an illegal private duty nursing service out of her home. Ann Weaver Filkins, from the town of Pulteney, pleaded guilty to charges of Grand Larceny. And promised to make restitution. Filkins is scheduled to be sentenced March 12th. She could face four years in prison.According to the State Attorney General's office, Filkins submitted a number of reimbursement claims from November, 1997 to July 1999.

    Grand Jury to hear rape allegations

    Jan 24, 2001

    State Police Completes Rape Investigation

    Jan 23, 2001

    No Bail for Drug Suspects

    Jan 23, 2001

    Athena Award Winner

    Jan 18, 2001

    New Penfield Library

    Jan 18, 2001

    Rochester NY – The Penfield Town Board will dedicate a new one-point-nine million dollar library this evening at the Penfield Community Center. Last January Penfield voters approved funding needed to make major improvements at the library, which included expanding the facility from over 17 thousand feet to 28 thousand square feet.As a result of this expansion, Penfield's town property tax rate increased eight cents for every one thousand dollars of assessed value.

      Pages

      Stories from those who experienced the era

      News from NPR

      As Florida residents assess damage left by Hurricane Irma, the system's latest victims include more than a million people without power in Georgia and South Carolina, where coastal areas also reported heavy flooding.

      Some residents of Key Largo are being allowed back in Tuesday morning but the Florida Keys are still largely without power, water, medical service and cell service. Most Keys residents are anxiously waiting to hear when they can return home and others who stayed despite mandatory evacuations remain stranded there. More than 80 percent of customers on the Keys are currently are without power.

      Hurricane Irma was the longest-lasting powerful hurricane or typhoon ever recorded, worldwide.

      Irma sustained its 185-mph winds for 37 hours – "the longest any cyclone around the globe has maintained that intensity on record," according to Phil Klotzbach, a research scientist at Colorado State University. The previous record was held by Typhoon Haiyan, also called Super Typhoon Yolanda, which hit the Philippines in 2013.

      More news from NPR

      From the Inclusion Desk

      Rosalie Winard

      A woman who helped shine the light on the unique abilities of an autistic mind will be inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame in Seneca Falls next week.

      Temple Grandin, an author, speaker, and champion of farm animal welfare said the honor means a lot to her.

      "Because when I first started in the seventies,” she said, “being a woman in a man's industry - the cattle industry - that was hard and I had to prove that I could do it. I was really motivated to make sure that my stuff was really good and that I wasn't stupid." 

      When a member of your family is in a wheelchair you may not think taking off on a kayaking adventure together on the Erie Canal is possible. However, it is. On this Need to Know segment we join in on the experience with an area mother and son sharing this special moment together for the first time through Rochester Accessible Adventures. We also learn about the work being done by RAA in an effort to revolutionize inclusion when it comes to eliminating barriers to active lifestyles for individuals with disabilities and their families. 

      A living wage. That’s what a coalition of advocates and community agencies that support individuals with disabilities have been calling for in our state. The focus of that fight - the more than 120,000 New Yorkers who work with and care for individuals with disabilities. They’re called Direct Support Professionals (DSPs) and according to the New York State Chapter of the Arc they’re in chronic short supply While the governor allocated $55 million in the budget this year to support a wage increase for these professionals working with nonprofits - is that enough to recruit, train and sustain employees? We examine the current state of DSPs and the challenges they’re continuing to face on this Move to Include edition of Need to Know.

      A hard-fought wage increase battle saw some success this year. But workers who help those living with disabilities say they are still in need of support. On this edition of Need to Know we’ll discuss what a profession that some call underpaid and undervalued is looking for in an effort to help our most vulnerable and those trained to care for them.

      Also on the show, a revolution in inclusion. We’re checking out a local group on a mission to get businesses and organizations equipped to offer recreational activities to people of all abilities.

      More stories from the Inclusion Desk

      Rochester: Hub For Photonics

      What is photonics and why is it coming to Rochester?

      Meet the WXXI News Team

      The reporters you hear everyday