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Trump Keeps Elephant Trophy Import Ban In Place, For Now

Updated on Friday, Nov. 17, at 10:30 p.m. ET The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced Thursday that it had lifted an Obama-era ban on importing sport-hunted trophies of elephants from Zimbabwe and Zambia. But Friday evening, President Trump seemed to say that decision was being reconsidered , tweeting that he would review "all conservation facts" and issue an update "soon" with Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke. Zinke later issued a statement, saying: "President Trump and I have talked and...

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A podcast about growing up and trying to find a place where you belong -- when you've been told your whole life that you're different.

First hour: Monroe County Sheriff-elect Todd Baxter

Second hour: Author and historian Laurel Thatcher Ulrich

Caitlin Whyte / WXXI News

$1.3 million in two weeks. That's what the Rochester Rhinos say they need to raise in order to secure a 2018 season.

Owners Wendy and David Dworkin passionately asked the community to engage and support the beloved team in order to keep them around. An emotional speech came from Chief Soccer Officer and former head coach Pat Ercoli as well.

The Trump administration's proposed tax plan would eliminate the federal historical tax credit, and this has many local preservationists concerned about the future of saving historic buildings in our area.

We discuss what eliminating the tax credit could mean for those properties. In studio:

  • Larry Francer, associate director of preservation for the Landmark Society of Western NY
  • Daniel Mackay, deputy commissioner for historical preservation at the Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation
  • Dan McEneny, public outreach coordinator for the New York State Division for Historic Preservation
  • Patrick Dutton, local developer focused on Downtown Rochester

A family doctor in Washington, D.C. recently wrote a piece for the Federalist entitled "Stop Denying Science, Birth Control Isn't Necessary for Women's Health." The piece has led to backlash among the medical community, with doctors saying there is well-established evidence of the benefits of birth control as medication.

We discuss the science with one of the most outspoken women's health advocates in the country, Dr. Jen Gunter, along with two local doctors. Our guests:

  • Dr. Jen Gunter, M.D., San Francisco Bay area OB/GYN
  • Dr. Tara Gellasch, M.D., chief of medicine at United Memorial Medical Center
  • Dr. Sarah Betstadt, M.D., associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Rochester Medical Center

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Officials at Wilmorite say they are going to rethink their options now that the Pittsford Village Board has unanimously approved a 12 to 18 month moratorium on major construction in the village.

Wimorite had planned to purchase property from a local farmer and develop the area at 25 Schoen Place.

That's on hold now, as the village works on updating its village code and comprehensive plan.

Several corruption trials are set for 2018 after a scandal involving nine of Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s former associates who worked on his administration’s economic development projects. Advocates say they will continue to push for reforms to prevent such problems from happening again.

rochester.edu

An open letter has been signed by a number of professors outside the University of Rochester condemning the administration for its response to allegations of sexual harassment.

Over 200 professors from universities and colleges both in the United States and abroad have signed a letter to the UR board of trustees saying, "In the present circumstances, they cannot in good conscience encourage students to pursue educational or employment opportunities at the University of Rochester." 

Updated at 1:25 p.m. ET

Richard Cordray, the embattled director of Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, announced Wednesday that he will leave the agency by the end of November.

"I am confident that you will continue to move forward, nurture this institution we have built together, and maintain its essential value to the American public," Cordray wrote in an email to the agency's staff.

First hour: The benefits of birth control as medication

Second hour: The possible impacts of eliminating the federal historic tax credit

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The Western U.S. is just starting to recover after a prolonged, 16-year drought. A lack of water can force people to take a hard look at how they use it, and make big changes. That's what happened in southern Colorado, where farmers have tried a bold experiment: They're taxing themselves to boost conservation.

Colorado's San Luis Valley is a desperately dry stretch of land, about the same size as New Jersey.

Azzedine Alaia, the French-Tunisian designer known for his figure-sculpting fashions, has died at 77, the French Federation of Haute Couture and Fashion confirmed on Saturday.

In his more than four decades in the fashion industry, Alaia gained a reputation for going rogue; he refused to follow the calendar of international fashion weeks and released his collections only when he was ready. He rose to fame for his body-hugging designs that celebrated the female form.

The Palestinians threatened on Saturday to cease communication with the United States if the White House closes its diplomatic mission in Washington, D.C., lodging a potential thorn in President Trump's plans for Mideast peace.

The State Department says the office of the Palestine Liberation Organization must close under a little-known provision in U.S. law that forbids it from requesting Israelis be prosecuted for crimes against Palestinians. Trump may reverse the closure within 90 days if the Palestinians prove they are engaging in peace negotiations with the Israelis.

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From the Inclusion Desk

Caitlin Whyte / WXXI News

  

The benefits of music on individuals with autism are widely known. Improved focus, advances in speech and language, and better motor skills. But sometimes it’s about the growth that you can’t quantify in numbers.

On a Tuesday night in a sleepy plaza in Penfield, the Music Education Center is buzzing. Kids are in the waiting room, parents are catching up and students are practicing anything from trombone to piano.

Noah Svokos is a curly haired 13 year old who has been taking piano lessons for 5 years at the center.

NPR.org

NPR's 2016 Tiny Desk Contest Winner Gaelynn Lea is in Rochester this weekend for a performance at Nazareth College Saturday.

She never thought she would be a performer full time. Which is a funny thought to come from someone who in the last year had 200 shows in 39 states and 6 different countries.

Born with Brittle Bone Disease, Lea is a violin player but also uses the platform she’s been given to talk about disability rights.

An emerging model called self-direction is enabling people with disabilities to live more independent lives. Self-directed individuals choose where they live, they design their own days and activities, and they have more control over the funding they receive for daily support services.

While the model has produced positive results for people in our community, advocates say not everyone knows about it or understands the process well. We discuss what self-direction means, and we hear from people in our community who are navigating the process. Our guests:

The winner of NPR's 2016 Tiny Desk Concert is a remarkable musician from Duluth, Minnesota named Gaelynn Lea. Lea is a classically trained fiddler whose music includes Celtic and American fiddle traditions. Her submission, Someday We'll Linger in the Sun, was the judges' unanimous choice. If you watch Lea's video, you'll notice that she plays her violin in a style that you might not expect -- she holds it in front of herself, like a cello.

Lea has brittle bone disease, and when she fell in love with the cello as a young student, it was difficult for her to hold it. A teacher noticed, was inspired by Lea's gift for music, and helped her learn how to play the violin in the same style. Now, Lea plays solo shows and with her band. She's also a teacher and an advocate for people with disabilities. 

We talk to Lea about her music, her success, and about how to make all stages accessible to everyone.  She'll be in Rochester for a performance and talk at Nazareth College, but first, she joins us on Connections. Our guests:

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

Rochester: Hub For Photonics

What is photonics and why is it coming to Rochester?

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