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Federal Judge Upholds DACA, Calling White House Decision To Rescind It 'Capricious'

A federal judge has ruled against the Trump administration's decision to end deportation protections for some young immigrants, saying the White House was "arbitrary and capricious" in moving to end the Obama-era DACA program. In a blow to President Trump, who has long railed against the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, U.S. District Judge John D. Bates for the District of Columbia said the Department of Homeland Security had failed to provide an adequate rationale for why the...

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What's the ripple effect of the opioid crisis?

WXXI News looks at the people, places, and issues indirectly affected by the opioid crisis

WXXI News / Alex Crichton

Gas prices spiked in the Rochester region over the past week as the demand for gasoline hit record highs for April.

AAA of Western and Central New York pegs a gallon of gas in the Rochester region at $2.85 a gallon, a nine cent spike from last week. The large demand is one reason for the spike.

“Prices are likely to increase a bit more as demand increases,” said Lindsey Kensey, communications specialist with AAA. “This demand from last week is the highest on record for the month of April, and exceeds summer demand from years past.”

Updated at 10:52 p.m. ET

Ten people have been killed and 15 injured after a white van struck pedestrians on busy Yonge St. in Toronto today. The driver, identified by police as Alek Minassian, was located and arrested without injury.

The police had initially identified him as Alex Minassian.

In 2014, Roger Angell wrote a piece for the New Yorker called "This Old Man," where he explored life in his nineties. He wrote about coping with the loss of friends and family, and what it means to be relevant when you retire. He shared experiences talking with friends in their sixties where he felt invisible: “Honored, respected, even loved, but not quite worth listening to anymore. You’ve had your turn, Pops; now it’s ours.”

Our guests discuss how they are staying connected to the community after retirement, and what relevance means to them.

  • Phil Dawson, recent retiree
  • Zenia Brown, part-time receptionist for WXXI Public Broadcasting Council
  • David D’Ettore, part-time security officer for WXXI Public Broadcasting Council, and aspiring writer
  • Nancy Preston Stark, retiree and playwright
  • Deborah White, retiree

A new mentoring conference for high school students across Monroe County aims to help young men address recurring issues that impact their lives as they transition into adulthood. The “Young Men’s Symposium: No Excuses” will help students explore topics like character development, healthy relationships, responsible fatherhood, respecting women, coping with loss, and more. Research shows black male students are over-referred for disciplinary action in schools, and in the criminal justice system, black youth are 18 times more likely than white youth to be sentenced as adults.

Our guests share their experiences as mentors and mentees, how they define “manhood,” and what self-empowerment means to them in today's world. In studio:

  • Cory Johnson, founder of RocCity 48
  • Melvin Cross, pastor at Glory House International
  • Nasmere Johnson, senior at School of the Arts
  • Jose Melendez, eight grade student at Leadership Academy for Young Men 
  • Rashad Smith, public relations freelancer for small businesses and entrepreneurs

freeimages.com/Julia Borysewicz

All this week, state and local law enforcement will increase patrols near high schools as part of a statewide campaign to limit the impacts of impaired and distracted driving as prom and graduation season approach.

Representatives of the governor's traffic safety committee kicked off the initiative at Brighton High School.

Student Hannah Newland said she was involved in a car crash while driving earlier this year.

A recent poll illustrates the stigma surrounding drug addiction.

More than three-quarters of New Yorkers who responded to a Siena College survey about the opioid crisis say the moral failings of those who are addicted is a contributing factor in the epidemic.

At the same time, people hold the opposing view that addiction is a disease.

First hour: Young Men's Symposium: No Excuses

Second hour: Exploring "senior relevance"

More than 40 Rochester area nonprofit and social justice organizations are participating in an activism fair next month.

They're looking to recruit new activists who are interested in social justice and political change, but aren't sure how to make a difference.

The second annual event is organized by Athesia Benjamin, an art teacher at Monroe Community College.

She said it was inspired last year by fears and frustrations about policies and actions of the Trump administration.

"I really love Rochester. I love the simplicity. I love the sense of neighborhood. I love the fact that it's common to speak to people on the street even if you don't know them."

So says retired music teacher Teryle (pronounced “TARE-il”) Watson, who possesses a birds’ eye view of music programs across the spectrum.  

Dresden Engle

Timing is everything. The announcement of an actual bricks, windows and door home for the Rochester Music Hall of Fame would have been the big surprise at any of the first six concerts honoring that year’s inductees.

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News from NPR

After she found out her husband was having an affair, Jennair Gerardot got on a train from Delaware to Pennsylvania with a wig and extra clothing, broke into the home of the other woman and fatally shot her, authorities said. Then she turned the revolver on herself.

Every day, 15,000 children five years old or younger die of preventable conditions diarrhea and pneumonia. In 2016, that number added up to 5.6 million children, most of them in the developing world, according to the World Health Organization.

What if a simple intervention could save tens of thousands of those children? Seems like a no-brainer — unless the method used to save them puts tens of thousands of others at risk in the future.

In jails and prisons across the United States, mental illness is prevalent and psychiatric disorders often worsen because inmates don't get the treatment they need, says journalist Alisa Roth.

In her new book Insane: America's Criminal Treatment of Mental Illness, Roth investigates the widespread incarceration of the mentally ill in the U.S., and what she sees as impossible burdens placed on correctional officers to act as mental health providers when they're not adequately trained.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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From the Inclusion Desk

The Challenger Miracle Field of Greater Rochester has received a significant grant from the Ralph C. Wilson Foundation.

Just over $487,000 will go towards the construction and operation of their inclusive complex in Webster, which makes sports more accessible for children with disabilities.

President of the Board of Directors for Challenger Miracle Field, Ron Kampff says part of that money will go towards phase two of the field’s buildout.

Musician redefines herself after hearing loss

Apr 4, 2018
Photo Credit: Eastman School of Music

Gaelen McCormick has been losing her hearing, to varying degrees over several years as a result of Ménière’s disease – a condition that also causes vertigo and tinnitus.

"My husband and I have a morning ritual. Wake up, and the first thing he says, is “I love you” and the next thing I can say is “I can hear you” or “I can’t hear you” – and that’s how we start our day." 

The loss of hearing was a particular challenge for McCormick because of her profession: she is a musician.

AutismUp.org

April is Autism Awareness and Acceptance Month. A local advocate says most people are aware of the condition, with one in 68 children getting the diagnosis.

But Rachel Rosner, director of education for AutismUp, says there's still room for improvement on the acceptance part.

Rosner hopes people can move closer to understanding and respecting the rights of those on the autism spectrum to live and thrive in their communities.

For 10 years Rochester has joined communities around the country to help do one thing: put an end to a word individuals with disabilities call offensive and derogatory - the R-word - meaning “retard” or “retarded.” It’s all part of an initiative spearheaded by the Golisano Foundation called: Spread the Word to End the Word. It’s linked to a national campaign launched by Special Olympics and Best Buddies. On this edition of Need to Know, we discuss the damaging impact of a word gone wrong.

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

Rochester: Hub For Photonics

What is photonics and why is it coming to Rochester?

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