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Shooting At Kentucky High School Leaves 2 Dead, At Least 17 Injured

At least two people were killed Tuesday in Benton, Ky., after a shooter opened fire on students and faculty at a local high school. Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin said at least 17 others were injured in the attack on Marshall County High School, 12 of whom sustained gunshot wounds. Both of the victims, a girl who died on the scene and a boy who died of his wounds later at a hospital, were 15 years old. "We are trying to determine that every one of those that has been shot was a student. It is our...

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A podcast about growing up and trying to find a place where you belong -- when you've been told your whole life that you're different.

Greg Cotterill / WXXI News

People participating in marches in the United States and around the world walked in support of female empowerment and denounced President Donald Trump's views on immigration, abortion, LGBT rights and women's rights on the anniversary of his inauguration.

That included the location often referred to as the birthplace of the women’s rights movement, Seneca Falls, where a large crowd marched Saturday by the Women’s Rights National Historical Park, and the National Women’s Hall of Fame, among other landmarks.

Updated at 8:40 p.m. ET

Determined to not let the momentum die, protesters once again converged on hundreds of cities — at home and abroad — for the second annual Women's March, seeking not only to unite in a call for social change but also to channel their fury into voter action.

Governor Cuomo's office

Governor Cuomo says despite the government shutdown, he’s going to try to use state money to keep the Statue of Liberty, which is in a federal park, open. And he says the  closure of the statue is a metaphor for what he says President Trump and Congress are doing through their policies on immigration.

“When they try to kick out immigrants, when they try to deport Dreamers, they’re trying to close down the Statue of Liberty,” said Cuomo. “I’m volunteering that the state will pay to keep the Statue of Liberty open.”

Caitlin Whyte / WXXI News

Washington Square Park was filled with pink hats and protest signs once again as the second Womens March gathered in downtown Rochester on Saturday.

Caroline Benec was out with a group of friends, she said as University of Rochester students they felt it was important to attend.

www.gayalliance.org

The organization that provides a variety of services to the LGBTQ+ community in the Greater Rochester area is looking for a new executive director.

The Out Alliance (formerly, the Gay Alliance of the Genesee Valley), has announced that Scott Fearing has resigned as executive director of the organization. Fearing has led the organization since 2013.

Fearing says that, “Helping to guide the growth of this incredible organization has been the honor of a lifetime. I am so excited to see where the agency will go in the future.” 

Updated at 9:45 p.m. ET

The federal government is in the midst of a partial shutdown, and it appears it will be that way for some time.

President Trump and members of Congress publicly say they want to reopen the federal government, but, in the first day of a shutdown, Republicans and Democrats on both sides of Pennsylvania Avenue showed no signs of ending their stalemate.

Women prepare to march in Seneca Falls a year later

Jan 19, 2018
Greg Cotterill / WXXI News

This weekend, women will be marching all over the nation in the name of equality. Reverend Leah Ntuala is  pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Seneca Falls and one of the organizers for a Women’s March happening in Seneca Falls on Saturday. She says it’s time to check in since last year and ensure all women are being heard and advocated for.

Tianna Manon

Classes have only been in session for two days at the University of Rochester. But already students are protesting the findings of an independent investigation into the allegations against professor Florian Jaeger and the University.

The death of rocker Tom Petty in October 2017 came as a result of an accidental drug overdose with a toxic mix of drugs taken for several ailments, including a fractured hip.

The results of an autopsy were released Friday by Los Angeles County Medical Examiner-Coroner Jonathan Lucas.

Petty died at 66 of "multisystem organ failure due to resuscitated cardiopulmonary arrest due to mixed drug toxicity," according to a brief statement.

The drugs listed included "fentanyl, oxycodone, temazepam, alprazolam, citalopram, acetylfentanyl, and despropionyl fentanyl."

United Way

It’s a big year for the United Way of Greater Rochester. The organization is being led by a new president and CEO, Jaime Saunders, and is celebrating its 100th anniversary. The United Way is also changing how it conducts its campaign, focusing on – what it calls – a year-round cycle of giving and service.

“Our launch is in January this year,” Saunders said. “Not in March, not in April, because we are now making a turning point for a year-round of service.”

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Coverage of harassment claims against faculty at the University of Rochester

News from NPR

It was 8:07 a.m. when the alert hit phones across Hawaii.

"BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII," it declared in no uncertain terms. "SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL."

Just two minutes later Gov. David Ige learned the alert was a mistake.

Then, an additional 15 minutes passed.

President Trump will have some shoveling to do as he heads to snowy Switzerland this week.

He's trying to sell his "America First" brand of economic nationalism in the mecca of globalization — the World Economic Forum in the Swiss ski resort of Davos. The president will also be meeting with the head of the African Union, two weeks after he reportedly dismissed African nations in crude and vulgar terms.

Ursula K. Le Guin, a prolific novelist best known for the Earthsea series and The Left Hand of Darkness, died Monday at the age of 88. Across more than 20 novels and scores of short stories, Le Guin crafted fantastic worlds to grapple with profoundly difficult questions here on Earth, from class divisions to feminist theory.

Her agent Ginger Clark confirmed Le Guin's death to NPR.

This post will be updated.

Turkey's military offensive in northwest Syria, dubbed "Operation Olive Branch," has alarmed several countries and led to an emergency session of the United Nations Security Council. It pits U.S. ally and NATO member Turkey against a Kurdish fighting force armed and trained by the United States as part of the fight to defeat ISIS in Syria.

The fighting has thrown a spotlight on the confusing and at times conflicting alliances and goals in the U.S.-led anti-ISIS coalition.

More news from NPR

From the Inclusion Desk

Classically trained violinist and songwriter Gaelynn Lea has been immersed in music since her childhood. While she says her primary focus in life is on her career as a musician, it was her rise to fame after winning the 2016 NPR Tiny Desk contest when she also took on a new role - that of a disability advocate and public speaker.  During a recent concert in Rochester at Nazareth College, Lea told Need to Know that the underrepresentation of people with disabilities in the arts has given her a new stage to share a powerful message.

We conclude our Dialogue on Disability Week with a conversation about "invisible" disabilities. Our guests share the challenges they face living with multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. In studio:

freeimages.com/Jos van Galen

Some 2,000 Rochester area residents with disabilities are in need of housing.

And that number only reflects individuals who get services through one state agency, the New York State Office of People With Developmental Disabilities.  The overall need for affordable, accessible housing is even greater.

This has always been an issue, but it's become a bigger problem in recent years, as more people are interested in living independently.

Our Dialogue on Disability Week continues with a conversation about adaptive sports. According to the CDC, nearly half of adults with disabilities ages 18 to 64 do not get aerobic physical activity. Local organizations are helping to change that by offering opportunities in adaptive sports.

We hear the stories of local athletes in those programs. Our guests:

  • Michael Cocquyt, supervisor of SportsNet
  • Jen Truscott, alpine skier
  • David Grace, sled hockey athlete, who participates in many winter sports

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

Rochester: Hub For Photonics

What is photonics and why is it coming to Rochester?

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