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President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin hold a joint news conference

President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin sat down for a summit today in in Helsinki, Finland. This is the first stand-alone summit between the two leaders, and comes just days after an American grand jury indicted 12 Russian intelligence officers on charges related to Russia's interference in the 2016 election. The two leaders are holding a news conference following their meetings

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Weekend Connections is a collection of some of the most noteworthy moments from the week on Connections with Evan Dawson. This episode includes conversations about:

  • Why refugees leave their native countries to pursue better lives in America;
  • What Rochester can learn about urbanism from cities around the world;
  • If centrism in politics is dying;
  • The making of pop hits.

cityofrochester.gov

Rochester is getting new help to run the Blue Cross Arena. And that help is coming from Buffalo.

City officials had only recently announced that they were ending the longtime management contract for the arena with Philadelphia-based SMG.  At the time, Rochester officials said  that company had performed below expectations.

AERIAL ASSOCIATES PHOTOGRAPHY, INC. BY ZACHARY HASLICK

Researchers predict less algae on Lake Erie this year compared to last, but that doesn’t mean no algae.

On a scale of one to ten, with ten being the most severe, Lake Erie’s algae blooms are predicted to be at a six this summer. That’s an improvement from last summer, when they were categorized at an eight.

Richard Stumpf is an oceanographer with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. He says, there’s a real simple reason they’re predicting fewer and smaller algae blooms.

Do you care if the music you listen to has meaning for the person who created it? Are you okay with music by committee? The New York Times recently told the story of one of the biggest pop hits of the summer. It’s a song called "The Middle," and it wasn’t performed by anyone who had anything to do with it. The producers sculpted this song because they thought it would sell, and it has.

Should we care about the origin of the music we hear? Our guests discuss it.

A long-running battle over the environment is over at the southern end of Seneca Lake -- at least that’s how it appears, with the New York DEC deciding against allowing a big gas project in old salt caverns. The storage project would have a been a big one, and there was a lot of grassroots opposition on a number of grounds.

This hour, we examine what the DEC decided and why. It’s not just a question of safety; there’s more to it. We’re talking about community character and why this decision might impact future decisions and how grassroots organizers do their work. Our guests:

Updated at 9:38 p.m. ET

The Justice Department charged 12 Russian intelligence officers on Friday with a litany of alleged offenses related to Russia's hacking of the Democratic National Committee's emails, state election systems and other targets in 2016.

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who announced the indictments, said the Russians involved belonged to the military intelligence service GRU. They are accused of a sustained cyberattack against Democratic Party targets, including its campaign committee and Hillary Clinton's campaign.

Jenna Flanagan/Innovation Trail

First hour: Environmentalists react to the DEC's rejection of a gas storage proposal on Seneca Lake

Second hour: Discussing pop hits and the meaning behind songs

Report from NY health officials calls for pot legalization

Jul 13, 2018
wnyc.org

Proposals to permit recreational marijuana use in New York state took a big step forward Friday when state health officials issued a long-awaited report concluding that the benefits of legalization outweigh the risks.

The 74-page analysis from the Department of Health estimates the state could raise nearly $700 million in tax revenue off the drug and create more than 200,000 new jobs.

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP)  A U.S.-Canadian agency is suggesting ways the two nations can help prevent flame-retardant chemicals from polluting the Great Lakes.

The International Joint Commission made the recommendations in a report Thursday. They're directed toward both federal governments as well as states, provinces, tribes and cities.

Updated at 12:35 p.m. ET

President Trump denied criticizing British Prime Minister Theresa May on her home soil Friday, despite being quoted in an interview with a British tabloid saying she had gone "the opposite way" and ignoring advice he gave her regarding Britain's withdrawal from the European Union.

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News from NPR

China has filed a case with the World Trade Organization against the U.S. to protest the Trump administration's plan to put new tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese imports. China says the tariffs are illegal attempts at protectionism.

China's Ministry of Commerce announced it is pursuing legal remedy against the U.S. in a brief statement on its website — the latest in an escalating trade conflict between the world's two largest economies.

Fewer Homeless Veterans On LA's Streets

2 hours ago

The lack of affordable housing is at the forefront of the homeless crisis in Los Angeles County. But the city's annual point-in-time homeless count, released on June 1, showed that the veteran homeless population had declined 18 percent.

A mob in Indonesia has slaughtered nearly 300 crocodiles at a wildlife sanctuary in retaliation for a local man who was reportedly killed by one of the reptiles.

The incident occurred in Sorong, on the far western tip of West Papua province.

Do you remember the day you decided you were no good at math?

Or maybe you had the less common, opposite experience: a moment of math excitement that hooked you for good?

Thousands of studies have been published that touch on the topic of "math anxiety." Overwhelming fear of math, regardless of one's actual aptitude, affects students of all ages, from kindergarten to grad school.

More news from NPR

From the Inclusion Desk

Prime Care Coordination, described by its executive director Tracy Boff as “an umbrella organization” for groups that aid people with disabilities, has opened its regional hub in Webster.

“This is going to coordinate all of a person’s care including their medical care, behavioral health needs, social needs, their housing — all of their needs,” Boff said.

Prime Care, a Medicaid-funded company wholly owned by non-profit agencies, has replaced the Medicaid Service Coordination program, which until July 1 handled medical and social services for people with disabilities.

New York agency to protect disabled vows more transparency

Jul 5, 2018
New York State Justice Center for the Protection of People with Special Needs

ALBANY — New York's agency tasked with investigating accusations of abuse and neglect against disabled people in state care is promising to improve transparency following years of complaints about conducting nearly all of its work in secret.

Denise Miranda took over last year as executive director of the Justice Center for the Protection of People with Special Needs.

freeimages.com/Thomas Picard

The founder of Rochester's first film camp for deaf and hard of hearing youth is offering a workshop at Writers and Books this summer.

Speaking through an interpreter, Stacy Lawrence said she wants to share her passion for filmmaking with kids and help them understand what they are capable of.

"I want these children to realize that they are in the same company as wonderful deaf artists and deaf poets right here in Rochester, right under our noses."

Reports of sexual abuse of individuals with disabilities in New York State funded and licensed facilities will now be investigated by a newly created response team.

The Justice Center for the Protection of People with Special Needs says the establishment of the specially trained team comes at a critical time.

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

What's the ripple effect of the opioid crisis?

WXXI News looks at the people, places, and issues indirectly affected by the opioid crisis

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