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Shooting At Kentucky High School Leaves 2 Dead, At Least 17 Injured

At least two people were killed Tuesday in Benton, Ky., after a shooter opened fire on students and faculty at a local high school. Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin said at least 17 others were injured in the attack on Marshall County High School, 12 of whom sustained gunshot wounds. Both of the victims, a girl who died on the scene and a boy who died of his wounds later at a hospital, were 15 years old. "We are trying to determine that every one of those that has been shot was a student. It is our...

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Vice President Pence says the U.S. will complete the plan to move its embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem by the end of 2019, announcing a faster timeline for opening the embassy than had been previously reported. Pence announced the new deadline during his visit to Israel.

"In the weeks ahead, our administration will advance its plan to open the United States Embassy in Jerusalem — and that United States Embassy will open before the end of next year," Pence said.

freeimages.com/Brian Hoskins

Imagine if the flu was about as common as diphtheria, measles, or other relatively rare viruses.

Researchers say if a universal vaccine being tested right now does what they hope it will, people would be able to get a flu shot once every five or ten years and be protected against any form of influenza.

As health officials report one of the most severe flu seasons in recent years, Rochester Clinical Research is one of five sites around the U.S. enrolling subjects in trial studies for the vaccine.

Public trust in the media is at an all-time low. One reason - concern over ‘fake news’ is at a high. That’s according to a new survey released this week by Gallup and the Knight Foundation. Seventy-three percent of Americans say inaccurate information on the web is a “major problem” with news coverage. So how do we deal with this issue of ‘fake news’ and how do we improve public trust in the media? Mike Johansson (Senior Lecturer, RIT School of Communication), Deanna Dewberry (Anchor & Reporter, News10NBC), and Justin Murphy (Education Reporter, Democrat & Chronicle), in addition to Rochester area residents, share their perspectives on this edition of Need to Know

Updated at 9:05 p.m. ET

President Trump has signed a stopgap spending bill passed by Congress on Monday, ending the partial shutdown of the federal government after three days.

The White House has said normal government operations will resume by Tuesday morning.

www.nps.gov

NEW YORK (AP) — The Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island will be open for visitors Monday, with New York state picking up the tab for the federal workers.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo made the announcement Sunday afternoon.

The two sites have been closed due to the federal government shutdown.

The Democratic Cuomo says the sites are vital to the state's tourism industry, so the state will spend about $65,000 per day for the federal employees who operate the sites. He says the revenue gained more than offsets the costs.

Matt Ryan New York Now

On Monday, the first of a series of federal corruption trials begins for several former associates of Gov. Andrew Cuomo. The proceedings in the federal courthouse in lower Manhattan will focus on bribery and other charges against Cuomo’s former closest aide, Joe Percoco. 

Percoco worked for Cuomo and his father, the late Gov. Mario Cuomo, on and off since Percoco was a teenager. Mario Cuomo once referred to Percoco as his “third son.”

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A friend and colleague of Wendell Castle said the artist was tireless and always enthusiastic about his next venture.

WXXI News spoke with Professor and Chair of RITs Industrial Design program Josh Owen, who came to RIT about eight years ago, and had been working with Castle ever since.

"Always enthusiastic about innovation and about pushing materiality and technology. We brought countless students and faculty into his studio to witness his robot carving away at his new ideas that were otherwise impossible to realize in any other manner."

Kodak made news when the former photo giant announced it will launch its own Bitcoin-like currency later this month called “Kodak Coin.” Kodak joins the cryptocurrency craze at a time when all eyes are on the market leader, Bitcoin. The digital currency saw a surge in 2017 yet some investors and researchers question its viability long-term and whether the “Bitcoin bubble”  as some call it will soon pop. RIT’s Josephine Wolff (Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Computing Security) and Bitcoin NYS Founder Gary Palmer Jr., weigh in on this segment of Need to Know.

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An iconic figure in the art world, both in Rochester and around the world has died.

Wendell Castle died in his Scottsville home on Saturday. That word came Sunday morning from RIT, where Castle was an artist in residence. He was 85 years old.

Wendell Castle was an artist for more than 60 years and is considered a founder of the American Crafts and Art Furniture movements. More than 100  of his works are installed in museums worldwide, and up until recently, was still innovating in his studio in the Rochester area.

Updated at 10:01 p.m. ET

The Senate will vote at noon on Monday to end the government shutdown. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell took to the floor Sunday evening and laid out a plan to restore government funding for three weeks and consider immigration proposals, while bipartisan talks continue to end the impasse that has triggered a partial government shutdown since Friday night.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer objected to a vote on Sunday evening, but not the plan to vote on Monday.

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Coverage of harassment claims against faculty at the University of Rochester

News from NPR

It was 8:07 a.m. when the alert hit phones across Hawaii.

"BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII," it declared in no uncertain terms. "SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL."

Just two minutes later Gov. David Ige learned the alert was a mistake.

Then, an additional 15 minutes passed.

President Trump will have some shoveling to do as he heads to snowy Switzerland this week.

He's trying to sell his "America First" brand of economic nationalism in the mecca of globalization — the World Economic Forum in the Swiss ski resort of Davos. The president will also be meeting with the head of the African Union, two weeks after he reportedly dismissed African nations in crude and vulgar terms.

Ursula K. Le Guin, a prolific novelist best known for the Earthsea series and The Left Hand of Darkness, died Monday at the age of 88. Across more than 20 novels and scores of short stories, Le Guin crafted fantastic worlds to grapple with profoundly difficult questions here on Earth, from class divisions to feminist theory.

Her agent Ginger Clark confirmed Le Guin's death to NPR.

This post will be updated.

Turkey's military offensive in northwest Syria, dubbed "Operation Olive Branch," has alarmed several countries and led to an emergency session of the United Nations Security Council. It pits U.S. ally and NATO member Turkey against a Kurdish fighting force armed and trained by the United States as part of the fight to defeat ISIS in Syria.

The fighting has thrown a spotlight on the confusing and at times conflicting alliances and goals in the U.S.-led anti-ISIS coalition.

More news from NPR

From the Inclusion Desk

Classically trained violinist and songwriter Gaelynn Lea has been immersed in music since her childhood. While she says her primary focus in life is on her career as a musician, it was her rise to fame after winning the 2016 NPR Tiny Desk contest when she also took on a new role - that of a disability advocate and public speaker.  During a recent concert in Rochester at Nazareth College, Lea told Need to Know that the underrepresentation of people with disabilities in the arts has given her a new stage to share a powerful message.

We conclude our Dialogue on Disability Week with a conversation about "invisible" disabilities. Our guests share the challenges they face living with multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. In studio:

freeimages.com/Jos van Galen

Some 2,000 Rochester area residents with disabilities are in need of housing.

And that number only reflects individuals who get services through one state agency, the New York State Office of People With Developmental Disabilities.  The overall need for affordable, accessible housing is even greater.

This has always been an issue, but it's become a bigger problem in recent years, as more people are interested in living independently.

Our Dialogue on Disability Week continues with a conversation about adaptive sports. According to the CDC, nearly half of adults with disabilities ages 18 to 64 do not get aerobic physical activity. Local organizations are helping to change that by offering opportunities in adaptive sports.

We hear the stories of local athletes in those programs. Our guests:

  • Michael Cocquyt, supervisor of SportsNet
  • Jen Truscott, alpine skier
  • David Grace, sled hockey athlete, who participates in many winter sports

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

Rochester: Hub For Photonics

What is photonics and why is it coming to Rochester?

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