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In Inaugural Address, Trump Decries 'Carnage' And Promises 'America First'

A newly inaugurated Donald J. Trump delivered a fiercely populist and often dark address, promising to transfer power in Washington from political elites to the people and vowing to put "America first." Surrounded by members of Congress and the Supreme Court, the nation's 45th president repeated themes from his historic and divisive campaign message, describing children in poverty, schools in crisis and streets pocked with crime and "carnage." "For too long, a small group in our nation's...

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NYS Dept of Ag & Markets

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York state is making $2 million available to local governments and non-profit groups to help in the fight against invasive species.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo's administration announced the funding on Thursday. The grants will support projects which seek to detect, monitor and stop the spread of non-native plants and animals.

Cuomo, a Democrat, says the funding is vital to helping the state control and remove invasive species and prevent them from doing damage to the local environment.

The grants range in size from $11,000 to $100,000.

The race for Rochester’s next mayor kicks off as the first official contender enters the ring. On this edition of Need to Know we’ll learn what James Sheppard will bring to the table that he says Mayor Lovely Warren hasn’t.

The peaceful transition of American power will be witnessed by the world once again Friday. Donald Trump will be sworn in as the 45th president of the United States. That has brought jubilation in conservative America. For them, Trump's win is a sigh of relief, a repudiation of Barack Obama's America and a pause on the liberalization of the world's remaining superpower.

The controversy over a development on Monroe Avenue in Brighton continues, with a statement released Thursday by Danny Daniele, whose family has been trying to develop a plaza on that road, near where their restaurant previously operated.

The Daniele family wants to put in a retail plaza there, and the proposal for a Whole Foods grocery store has resulted in pushback from some people in the area over traffic and other concerns.

Now, Danny Daniele says that the developers plan to remove the possibility of putting in a Chick-Fil-A restaurant from that plaza.

The New York Times set off a kind of firestorm with a front-page story on food stamps, or SNAP benefits. The story pushed the claim that soft drinks are the number one purchase for households that use SNAP. It turns out that the Times did a rather loose job at interpreting the data, and critics say the article became a vehicle to malign Americans in poverty.

So we start there: what did the article get right, and what did it get wrong? And then we discuss the best ways to promote access to healthy food for everyone. Our guests:

  • Mitch Gruber, chief program officer for Foodlink
  • Mike Bulger, healthy communities coordinator for the Healthi Kids program at Finger Lakes Health Systems Agency  
  • Leverett Copeland, SNAP recipient and healthy living ambassador

Republicans are rapidly preparing to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Donald Trump said this week that it would be replaced with a program that would cover all Americans at a lower cost. Assuming this is impossible, there are significant questions about what the replacement for the ACA will be.

Our panel discusses what they know, what they don't, and what they think the big questions are regarding the next iteration of American health care. WXXI health reporter and producer Karen Shakerdge helps lead the discussion, along with our panel:

  • Dr. David Topa, pediatrician at Pittsford Pediatric Associates
  • Andrew Graupman, archaeologist concerned about losing health insurance
  • Dr. Brendan O'Connor, primary care physician at Unity Family Medicine at Chili Center

(AP & WXXI News) The state's attorney general on Thursday issued guidance to local governments on how they can put laws and policies in place to limit their participation in federal immigration enforcement activities under Republican President-elect Donald Trump's administration. 

Governor Cuomo's office

One of Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s signature economic development programs is being downsized in his new state budget. Start-Up NY is being rebranded as other economic development projects have suffered setbacks.

The Start-Up NY program — which offered 10 years of freedom from income, business and other taxes to companies that sought to begin a business on a college campus — initially was a centerpiece of Cuomo’s big plans for more jobs in upstate New York.

January is Cervical Health Awareness Month, which means organizations are talking about cervical cancer, HPV and prevention.

arcmonroe.org

Governor Cuomo's budget does not include funding to help direct care workers achieve a living wage, and that could mean changes at organizations like the Arc of Monroe.

The coalition “bFair2DirectCare” has been pushing for $45 million dollars in funding to raise caregiver pay.

Barbara Wale is CEO and President Arc of Monroe.

She says his budget doesn't include funding for direct support professionals --they assist people with developmental disabilities with activities for daily living.

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News from NPR

Donald Trump had already emerged as the likely presidential nominee of the Republican Party back in April when he gave a foreign policy speech pledging that "America First" would be "the major and overriding theme of my administration."

President Donald Trump, fulfilling a campaign promise to start to repeal Obamacare on Day 1, signed an order directing federal agencies to waive enforcement of large swaths of the law.

The one-page order allows the head of the Department of Health and Human Services or any other agency with authority under the law, not to enforce regulations that impose a financial burden on a state, company or individual.

Ed Boutin, 62, stood to the side of the road wearing a biker vest with pins, patches and flags, and sporting a "Navy Veteran" hat. He said he traveled from Springfield, Mass. to watch Donald J. Trump, his candidate of choice, get sworn in to the nation's highest office.

The current state of race relations in America is the result of Barack Obama's presidency, Boutin said. But maybe, he said, the new administration can fix things.

As promised, President Trump got to work on Day One, spending some time in the Oval Office in between the inaugural parade and a trio of formal balls.

Trump signed an executive order Friday night directing government agencies to "ease the burdens" of Obamacare while the new administration and Congress work toward repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act.

White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus presented Trump with the order, which he described as: "An executive order minimizing the economic burden of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act pending repeal."

More news from NPR

From the Inclusion Desk

WXXI ARTS INFOCUS

Music has a way of touching every one of us. Some of us may have a deep appreciation for the artistry in making music, others may appreciate its ability to convey emotion and transport us to a different place.

But, as shown at the Hochstein School of Music and Dance, music can also be used as a form of therapy. Expressive Arts sessions improve the quality of life for people who are well, and meets the needs of children and adults with disabilities, disorders, illnesses, or learning differences. 

Courtesy Aimee Levesque

At the Golden Globe Awards this year, Meryl Streep received an honorary award for outstanding contributions to the world of entertainment.

In her acceptance speech, she criticized President-elect Trump for mocking a reporter with a disability. Trump, who denies that, dismissed Streep’s comments on Twitter.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo is due to release his budget on Tuesday, and agencies that work with those with intellectual disabilities are among those hoping for more funds. They say they need help to pay workers the new higher minimum wage.

New York’s minimum wage is going up over the next few years, to $15 eventually in New York City and lesser amounts upstate. Groups that provide services for the developmentally disabled rely on Medicaid reimbursements to pay their workers, and they say they’ll have a hard time meeting the higher wages without more money from the state.

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

Rochester: Hub For Photonics

What is photonics and why is it coming to Rochester?

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